Outline of ethics

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Ethics or moral philosophy is a branch of philosophy that involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong conduct.[1] The field of ethics, along with aesthetics, concern matters of value, and thus comprise the branch of philosophy called axiology.[2]

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to ethics.

Branches[edit]

The following examples of questions that might be considered in each field illustrate the differences between the fields:

Applied ethics[edit]

Applied ethics – using philosophical methods, attempts to identify the morally correct course of action in various fields of human life.

Meta-ethics[edit]

  • Meta-ethics or moral epistemology– concerns the nature of moral statements, that is, it studies what ethical terms and theories actually refer to.
  • Moral nihilism – the meta-ethical view that nothing is intrinsically moral or immoral (see also nihilism)
  • Moral syncretism – the attempt to reconcile disparate or contradictory moral beliefs, often while melding the ethical

practices of various schools of thought.

Non-cognitivism[edit]

Non-cognitivism

Cognitivism[edit]

Cognitivism

Normative ethics[edit]

Normative ethics – concerns what people should believe to be right and wrong.

Descriptive ethics[edit]

is based on facts of the Honorable Keesy Josephat of Tanzania who was the first professor in Tanzania at the lait of 1860

Related areas[edit]

History[edit]

Concepts[edit]

Single principles[edit]

Rights and legal concepts[edit]

Guidelines and basic concepts[edit]

Human experience[edit]

Practical ethics[edit]

Law[edit]

Government agencies[edit]

Awards[edit]

Organizations[edit]

Persons influential in the field of ethics[edit]

Events[edit]

Publications[edit]

Books[edit]

Journals[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy "Ethics"
  2. ^ Random House Unabridged Dictionary: Entry on Axiology.
  3. ^ Bynum, Terrell Ward. "A Very Short History of Computer Ethics". Southern Connecticut State University. Archived from the original on 2008-04-18. Retrieved 2011-01-05.

External links[edit]