People's Progress Party

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People's Progress Party
Leader Ben Micah [1]
President Brown Sinamoi [1]
Secretary Moses Kar [1]
Founder Julius Chan
Founded November 11, 1969 (1969-11-11)
National Parliament
7 / 111

The People's Progress Party is a political party in Papua New Guinea.

It was founded on 11 November 1969 by Julius Chan and Warren Dutton, forming a caucus of eleven members of the House of Assembly of Papua and New Guinea.[2][3]

Following independence in 1975, Chan served, while party leader, as Prime Minister from 1980 to 1982 and 1994 to 1997. Chan’s second Government was brought down by the Sandline Affair and the party suffered in the elections that year. Chan and acting Prime Minister John Giheno lost their seats, and Michael Nali became the party’s leader in Parliament.

When Chan was not serving as Prime Minister, the party was often a junior partner in a coalition with the Pangu Party. At the 2002 General Elections, the party won 8 seats, becoming the third largest party. At the 2007 General Election the party lost half of its seats. However, the party’s original leader, Julius Chan, returned to Parliament, and took over the party’s leadership. Chan ran as the opposition candidate for Prime Minister, but received the support of only 21 of the 109 members of Parliament.

The party had 7 members in the 111-seat National Parliament of Papua New Guinea as of November 2016, and was part of the governing coalition of Prime Minister Peter O'Neill.[4]

Current party leaders[edit]

Former party leaders[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "REGISTRY OF POLITICAL PARTIES". Integrity of Political Parties and Candidates Commission. Archived from the original (PDF) on 11 April 2017. Retrieved 11 April 2017. 
  2. ^ Woolford, Don (2013). Papua New Guinea. University of Queensland Press. p. 112. 
  3. ^ "Australian Political Chronicle: Papua New Guinea". Australian Journal of Politics and History. 17 (1). 1971. 
  4. ^ "Clarity on MP numbers in PNG political parties". Radio New Zealand News International. 17 November 2016.