Phanera vahlii

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Phanera vahlii
Bauhinia vahlii in Ananthagiri forest, AP W IMG 9204.jpg
Flower in Ananthagiri Hills, in Ranga Reddy district of Andhra Pradesh, India
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Fabales
Family: Fabaceae
Subfamily: Cercidoideae[2]
Tribe: Bauhinieae[3][4]
Genus: Phanera
Species: P. vahlii
Binomial name
Phanera vahlii[1]
(Wight & Arn., 1834) Benth.
Synonyms
  • Bauhinia racemosa Vahl
  • Bauhinia vahlii Wight & Arn.
Pods of Phanera vahlii in Mathurapati Fulbari VDC Nepal

Phanera vahlii is a perennial creeper of the Caesalpiniaceae family native to the Indian subcontinent.

The roasted seeds of this woody climber are edible.[5]

Phanera species have 2–3 fertile stamens.[6]

Distribution[edit]

Phanera vahlii is found from Sikkim and Nepal across India and Punjab, Pakistan.

Local names[edit]

In Hindi, it is called मालू malu, but also mahul, jallaur and jallur. In Nepali it is called भोर्ला bhorla.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sinou, C., Forest, F., Lewis, G. P., Bruneau, A.. (2009). "The genus Bauhinia s.l. (Leguminosae): a phylogeny based on the plastid trnLtrnF region". Botany. 87 (10): 947–960. doi:10.1139/B09-065.
  2. ^ The Legume Phylogeny Working Group (LPWG). (2017). "A new subfamily classification of the Leguminosae based on a taxonomically comprehensive phylogeny". Taxon. 66 (1): 44–77. doi:10.12705/661.3.
  3. ^ Sinou C, Forest F, Lewis GP, Bruneau A (2009). "The genus Bauhinia s.l. (Leguminosae): A phylogeny based on the plastid trnLtrnF region". Botany. 87 (10): 947–960. doi:10.1139/B09-065.
  4. ^ Wunderlin RP (2010). "Reorganization of the Cercideae (Fabaceae: Caesalpinioideae)" (PDF). Phytoneuron. 48: 1–5.
  5. ^ Khan, M., & Hussain, S. (2014). Diversity of Wild Edible Plants and Flowering Phenology of District Poonch (J&K) in the Northwest Himalyay. Indian Journal Sci. Res 9(1): 32–38.
  6. ^ Wunderlin, R. P. (2010). "Reorganization of the Cercideae (Fabaceae: Caesalpinioideae)" (PDF). Phytoneuron. 48: 1–5.

External links[edit]