Saturday Night Live (season 9)

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Saturday Night Live (season 9)
The title card for the ninth season of Saturday Night Live.
Country of origin United States
No. of episodes 19
Release
Original network NBC
Original release October 8, 1983 (1983-10-08) – May 12, 1984 (1984-05-12)
Season chronology
← Previous
Season 8
Next →
Season 10
List of Saturday Night Live episodes

The ninth season of Saturday Night Live, an American sketch comedy series, originally aired in the United States on NBC between October 8, 1983, and May 12, 1984.

Cast changes[edit]

Before the start of the season the entire cast returned for another season. The only change was the hiring (and firing, then rehiring) of Jim Belushi (brother of late SNL cast member John Belushi). The notable moment of the season occurred when Eddie Murphy left the program 2 episodes short of the end of the season. After 48 Hours, Murphy's star began to eclipse that of Joe Piscopo's. From the start of season 7, Dick Ebersol made it clear that his strategy was to showcase Murphy and Piscopo as much as possible while all the other cast members would play mainly supporting roles and were treated with very little patience by the producers.

With his movie career going strong, Eddie Murphy almost didn't return to the show for the 9th season. He agreed to return, but only wanted to appear in half the season's episodes. Dick Ebersol was adamant that he needed Murphy to appear in each episode. Murphy came up with an interesting solution: They would videotape a stockpile of sketches featuring Murphy to be inserted into the shows Murphy did not appear live in. The fact that Murphy appeared in some shows via pretaped sketches was never disclosed to the TV watching audience.

When the season ended Piscopo left with no intention of returning. Robin Duke, Brad Hall and Tim Kazurinsky were all fired from the show.

Format changes[edit]

Ebersol had taken Hall off Weekend Update (known as Saturday Night News during this time) mid-season. The segment then had a revolving door of other anchors mostly involving the episode's host and, in one case, Joe Piscopo (although Piscopo only introduced a commentary and didn't tell any actual jokes).

Hosts[edit]

Future cast member Billy Crystal hosted twice this season: once with musical guest Al Jarreau and again on the season finale with Ed Koch, Edwin Newman, Betty Thomas, and former castmember Don Novello.

Cast[edit]

bold denotes Weekend Update anchor

Writers[edit]

This season's writers were Jim Belushi, Andy Breckman, Robin Duke, Adam Green, Mary Gross, Nate Herman, Tim Kazurinsky, Kevin Kelton, Andy Kurtzman, Michael McCarthy, Eddie Murphy, Pamela Norris, Margaret Oberman, Joe Piscopo, Andrew Smith, Bob Tischler, Eliot Wald and Herb Sargent. The head writers were Bob Tischler and Andrew Smith.

Episodes[edit]

No.
overall
No. in
season
Host(s) Musical guest(s) Original air date
160 1 Brandon Tartikoff John Cougar Mellencamp October 8, 1983
161 2 Danny DeVito & Rhea Perlman Eddy Grant October 15, 1983
162 3 John Candy Men at Work October 22, 1983
163 4 Betty Thomas Stray Cats November 5, 1983
164 5 Teri Garr Mick Fleetwood's Zoo
Lindsey Buckingham
November 12, 1983
165 6 Jerry Lewis Loverboy November 19, 1983
166 7 The Smothers Brothers Big Country December 3, 1983
167 8 Flip Wilson Stevie Nicks December 10, 1983
168 9 Father Guido Sarducci (Don Novello) Huey Lewis and the News January 14, 1984
169 10 Michael Palin The Motels January 21, 1984
170 11 Don Rickles Billy Idol January 28, 1984
171 12 Robin Williams Adam Ant February 11, 1984
172 13 Jamie Lee Curtis The Fixx February 18, 1984
173 14 Edwin Newman Kool & the Gang February 25, 1984
174 15 Billy Crystal Al Jarreau March 17, 1984
175 16 Michael Douglas Deniece Williams April 7, 1984
176 17 George McGovern Madness April 14, 1984
177 18 Barry Bostwick Spinal Tap May 5, 1984
178 19 Billy Crystal, Ed Koch, Edwin Newman, Don Novello, Betty Thomas The Cars May 12, 1984

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Saturday Night Live: The First Twenty Years. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 1994. pp. 124–127. ISBN 0-395-70895-8. 
  2. ^ "January 28, 1984". SNL Archives. Archived from the original on May 20, 2011.