Steele Creek, North Carolina

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Steele Creek
Steele Creek, North Carolina is located in North Carolina
Steele Creek, North Carolina
Location within North Carolina
Coordinates: 35°08′04″N 80°58′43″W / 35.1345°N 80.9785°W / 35.1345; -80.9785Coordinates: 35°08′04″N 80°58′43″W / 35.1345°N 80.9785°W / 35.1345; -80.9785
Country United States
State North Carolina
CountyMecklenburg County
CityCharlotte
Council District3
Founded1760[2]
Annexed1987–Ongoing[3]
Government
 • City CouncilVictoria Watlington[4]
Area
 • Total120 km2 (47 sq mi)
Elevation
200 m (600 ft)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total52,014[1][a]
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
ZIP code
28273, 28278
Area code(s)704, 980
GNIS feature ID1001413[5]

Steele Creek is primarily considered to be a community and neighborhood in the southwestern part of Mecklenburg County in North Carolina. It is generally defined geographically by the original boundaries of Steele Creek Township.[6] Most of Steele Creek is within the city limits of Charlotte but the areas that have not yet been annexed are also recognized as a Township of North Carolina.[7]

Population[edit]

The population of the Steele Creek community was 52,014 as of 2010, roughly two-thirds of which is now located within the City of Charlotte.[1][8]

History[edit]

Early[edit]

The Steele Creek community derives its name from the small creek bearing the same name. It is believed that name "Steele" was the family surname of Scotch-Irish immigrants who settled in the area in the late 17th and early 18th centuries.[8] The region was eventually designated as Steele Creek Township, one of the original 15 Townships of Mecklenburg County.[6]

Modern[edit]

In 1959, the North Carolina State Legislature revised laws that govern how cities may annex adjacent areas, allowing municipalities to annex unincorporated lands without permission of those residents.[9] This change in North Carolina law led to adoption of an aggressive annexation policy by the City of Charlotte, which repeatedly expanded its borders by annexing land within Steele Creek Township, which had never been formally incorporated.[10]

Despite nearly two-thirds of Steele Creek being annexed by Charlotte, the region remained primarily rural farmland until the 2000s, when significant infrastructure improvements greatly accelerated the effects of suburban sprawl. The widening of NC 49, the replacement of the old Buster Boyd Bridge, and the opening of I-485, spurred tremendous growth in both residential and commercial development. Today Steele Creek is the fastest growing region of Charlotte/Mecklenburg County, with more than a 70% population boom between 2000 and 2007.[11]

Subdivisions[edit]

Steele Creek has several subdivisions within its area, most of which are residential. Listed here are the most notable subdivisions:

  • Arrowood, a corridor of mostly commercial businesses and apartment complexes along Arrowood Road.
  • Ayrsley is a mixed-use development between Westinghouse Boulevard and Interstate 485.[12]
  • Berewick, developed by Pappas Properties, is a mixed-use development between Shopton Road and Dixie River Road.[13][14]
  • Olde Whitehall, a corridor of mostly commercial and retail businesses along Interstate 485, between South Tryon Street and Arrowood Road.
  • Palisades, a golf course community in the most southwestern part of Steele Creek, centered around the Palisades Country Club.[15]
  • Shopton, centered at intersection of Steele Creek Road and Shopton Road, is a mostly industrial zoned area.
  • Yorkshire is a large residential subdivision between Choate Circle and Carowinds Boulevard.[16]

Schools and libraries[edit]

The Steele Creek branch of the Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County

School system[edit]

The first school in Steele Creek was founded in the 1780s.[17] Today, Steele Creek is served by the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools (CMS) district. These include Olympic High, Kennedy Middle, Southwest Middle, Lake Wylie Elementary, Steele Creek Elementary, Winget Park Elementary, River Gate Elementary, Berewick Elementary and Palisades Park Elementary.[18]

Libraries[edit]

Steele Creek is served by a branch of the Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County.[19] The library is located on Steele Creek Road in front of Southwest Middle School.

Infrastructure[edit]

Main thoroughfares[edit]

Mass transit[edit]

The Charlotte Area Transit System (CATS) offers local and express bus service in the area.[20]

Current routes:

Utilities[edit]

Water and Trash pick-up is mostly serviced by the city of Charlotte, though third-party companies do service some developments in the area. Electricity is provided by Duke Energy, which holds a monopoly. Natural gas is provided by Piedmont Natural Gas, which holds a monopoly. Data/Telephone/Television service is all offered by AT&T, Charter Communications, Windstream Communications, and Comporium (Ayrsley area only).

Health care[edit]

Carolinas HealthCare System Steele Creek is a healthcare pavilion that includes a 24-hour emergency department. Patients that require long-term care are transferred to another hospital, such as Carolinas HealthCare System Pineville or Carolinas Medical Center. Outpatient services is also available at two Urgent Care centers (Presbyterian Medical Plaza and Carolinas HealthCare Urgent Care-Steele Creek).

Compleat Rehab & Sports Therapy in the Berewick Town Center of Steele Creek offers the community access to expert physical therapists with services including physical therapy, dry needling, sports therapy and performance, and work injury recovery and prevention.

Notable residents[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ By borders of original Steele Creek Township, including areas annexed by the City of Charlotte.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Steele Creek Population Expands Since 2000". Steele Creek Residents Association. March 6, 2011. Retrieved March 16, 2018.
  2. ^ "Marker L-107". North Carolina Office of Archives & History. Retrieved October 14, 2021.
  3. ^ "Charlotte Explorer". City of Charlotte. Retrieved October 14, 2021.
  4. ^ "Meet the Council". City of Charlotte. Retrieved October 14, 2021.
  5. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Steele Creek, North Carolina
  6. ^ a b "Steele Creek Defined". The Steele Creek Blog. Retrieved 2007-08-11.
  7. ^ "North Carolina, Appendix F., County Subdivisions and Places - Section 16" (PDF). Census 2000. U.S. Census Bureau. 2000. Retrieved 2007-08-11.
  8. ^ a b "About Steele Creek". Steele Creek Residents Association. Retrieved 2007-08-11.
  9. ^ "Annexation - Frequently Asked Questions". OfficialCity of Charlotte & Mecklenburg County Government Web Site. July 2006. Archived from the original on 2007-09-28. Retrieved 2007-07-17.
  10. ^ Howard, J. Lee (2000-10-20). "Charlotte ranks high in population growth". Charlotte Business Journal. Retrieved 2007-07-17.
  11. ^ Valle, Kirsten (2007-09-09). "Steele Creek Bond Package Includes Land". The Charlotte Observer. Retrieved 2007-09-10.[dead link]
  12. ^ "Ayrsley". Retrieved September 30, 2021.
  13. ^ "Berewick". Retrieved September 30, 2021.
  14. ^ "Pappas Properties". Retrieved September 30, 2021.
  15. ^ "Explore the Palisades". Retrieved September 30, 2021.
  16. ^ "Yorkshire". Retrieved September 30, 2021.
  17. ^ "The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Story: History Timeline: Mecklenburg Communities". cmstory.org Web Site. Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. Archived from the original on 2015-10-01. Retrieved 2015-09-29.
  18. ^ "Steele Creek Residents Association: Local Government Fact Sheet". Retrieved 2008-10-25.
  19. ^ "Steele Creek branch of the Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County". Retrieved 2008-10-25.
  20. ^ "CATS Schedule Change". CATS. October 1, 2018. Retrieved October 5, 2018.
  21. ^ "16 South Tryon" (PDF). CATS. Retrieved October 5, 2018.
  22. ^ "56 Arrowood" (PDF). CATS. Retrieved October 5, 2018.
  23. ^ "Members of Congress / Melvin Watt". The U. S. Congress Votes Database. The Washington Post. Archived from the original on February 25, 2010. Retrieved January 11, 2010.

External links[edit]