Sulawesi flying fox

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Sulawesi Flying Fox)
Jump to: navigation, search
Sulawesi flying fox
Acerodon celebensis.JPG
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Chiroptera
Family: Pteropodidae
Genus: Acerodon
Species: A. celebensis
Binomial name
Acerodon celebensis
(Peters, 1867)
Sulawesi Flying Fox area.png
Sulawesi flying fox range
Synonyms

Acerodon arquatus

The Sulawesi flying fox or Sulawesi fruit bat (Acerodon celebensis) is a species of megabat endemic to Indonesia.[2] It is classified as "Vulnerable" by the IUCN due to unsustainable levels of hunting.

Distribution and habitat[edit]

The species is endemic to the Sulawesi, Butan, and several smaller Indonesian islands (Mangole, Sanana, Siau, Sangihe, Selayar). It prefers lowland habitats with an elevation of up to 1,500 m asl.[1]

Ecology[edit]

The Sulawesi flying fox is a frugivore, feeding preferentially on coconuts and breadfruits. The species roosts in trees, often in mangrove forests, and is somewhat sensitive to human disturbance. Roosting sites may be shared with the Black flying fox, which occupies the lower branches, while the Sulawesi flying fox keeps to the higher ones. Pups are born between February to March.[2]

Conservation[edit]

The species is classified as Vulnerable by the IUCN. Populations are declining primarily due to pressure from local hunting for home consumption and the bushmeat trade. Known roosting sites are heavily exploited, and the lack of official protection means that roosting trees may also be cut down. The Sulawesi flying fox is now regionally extinct in North Sulawesi because of overhunting.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Tsang, S.M. & Sheherazade (2016). "Acerodon celebensis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2016: e.T137A21988719. Retrieved 25 November 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Simmons, N.B. (2005). "Order Chiroptera". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 313. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494.