Tánaiste

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Tánaiste
Simon Coveney (September 2017).jpeg
Incumbent
Simon Coveney

since 30 November 2017
StyleTánaiste
Irish: A Thánaiste
Member of
Reports toTaoiseach
SeatDublin, Ireland
NominatorTaoiseach
AppointerPresident of Ireland
Inaugural holderSeán T. O'Kelly[1]
Formation29 December 1937[1]
Salary€177,518[2]

The Tánaiste (Irish pronunciation: [ˈt̪ˠaːn̪ˠəʃtʲə] (About this soundlisten)) is the deputy head of government of Ireland and thus its second-most senior office.[3][4] The Tánaiste is appointed by the President of Ireland on the advice of the Taoiseach. The current office holder is Simon Coveney, TD, who was appointed on 30 November 2017.[5]

Origins[edit]

Tánaiste was the Irish word for the heir of the chief (taoiseach) or king (), under the Gaelic system of tanistry. Before independence, the British Lord Lieutenant of Ireland or Viceroy was sometimes referred to in the Irish language as An Tánaiste-Rí, literally 'the deputy king'.

Modern office[edit]

The office was created in 1937 under the new Constitution of Ireland, replacing the previous office of Vice-President of the Executive Council that had existed under the Free State constitution. This office was first held by Kevin O'Higgins of Cumann na nGaedheal from 1922 to 1927.

The Taoiseach nominates a member of Dáil Éireann,[6] who will also be a member of the government, to the office. The nominee then receives their seal of office from the President of Ireland in recognition of their appointment. The Tánaiste acts in the place of the Taoiseach during his or her temporary absence. In the event of the Taoiseach's death or permanent incapacitation, the Tánaiste acts in their stead until another Taoiseach is appointed.[7] The Tánaiste is, ex officio, a member of the Council of State. The Tánaiste chairs meetings of the government in the absence of the Taoiseach and may take questions on their behalf in the Dáil or Seanad.

Aside from these duties, the title is largely honorific as the Constitution does not confer any additional powers on the office holder. While the Department of the Taoiseach is a Department of State, there is no equivalent for the Tánaiste. In theory the Tánaiste could be a minister without portfolio but every Tánaiste has in parallel held a ministerial portfolio as head of a Department of State. Dick Spring in the 1994–97 "Rainbow Coalition" had an official "Office of the Tánaiste", though other parties have not used this nomenclature.[8] Under Spring, Eithne Fitzgerald was "Minister of State at the Office of the Tánaiste", with responsibility for coordinating Labour policy in the coalition.[9][10]

Under a coalition government, the Tánaiste is typically the leader of the second-largest government party, just as the Taoiseach is usually leader of the largest; however, during the 1989–92 and the 2007–11 governments, the position was held by a Fianna Fáil member, although they were in coalition.

Three Tánaistí later held the office of Taoiseach: Seán Lemass, Bertie Ahern, and Brian Cowen. Two Tánaistí were later elected as President of Ireland: Seán T. O'Kelly and Erskine H. Childers.

List of office-holders[edit]

Vice-President of the Executive Council[edit]

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Constituency
Term of office Party Exec. Council
(President)
Ministries as Vice-President
1 Kevin O'Higgins.jpg Kevin O'Higgins
(1892–1927)
TD for Leix–Offaly until 1923
TD for Dublin County from 1923
6 December
1922
10 July
1927
Cumann na nGaedheal 1·2
(W.T.Cosgrave)
Justice (1922–27)
2 Ernest Blythe.jpg Ernest Blythe
(1889–1975)
TD for Monaghan
14 July
1927
9 March
1932
Cumann na nGaedheal 3·4·5
(W.T.Cosgrave)
Posts and Telegraphs (1927–32)
3 Sean T OKelly WhiteHouse 19390517.jpg Seán T. O'Kelly
(1882–1966)
TD for Dublin North until 1937
TD for Dublin North-West from 1937
9 March
1932
29 December
1937
Fianna Fáil 6·7·8
(de Valera)
Local Government and Public Health (1932–37)

Tánaiste[edit]

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Constituency
Term of office Party Government
(Taoiseach)
Ministries as Tánaiste
Subsequent higher offices
(3) Sean T OKelly WhiteHouse 19390517.jpg Seán T. O'Kelly
(1882–1966)
TD for Dublin North-West
29 December
1937
14 June
1945
Fianna Fáil 1·2·3·4
(de Valera)
Local Government and Public Health (1937–39)
Education (1939)
Finance (1939–45)
President of Ireland (1945–59)
4 Séan Lemass at Schiphol Airport (cropped).jpg Seán Lemass
(1899–1971)
TD for Dublin South
14 June
1945
18 February
1948
Fianna Fáil 4
(de Valera)
Supplies (1945)
Industry and Commerce (1945–48)
5 William Norton
(1900–1963)
TD for Kildare
18 February
1948
13 June
1951
Labour Party 5
(Costello)
Social Welfare (1948–51)
(4) Séan Lemass at Schiphol Airport (cropped).jpg Seán Lemass
(1899–1971)
TD for Dublin South-Central
13 June
1951
2 June
1954
Fianna Fáil 6
(de Valera)
Industry and Commerce (1951–54)
(5) William Norton
(1900–1963)
TD for Kildare
2 June
1954
20 March
1957
Labour Party 7
(Costello)
Industry and Commerce (1954–57)
(4) Séan Lemass at Schiphol Airport (cropped).jpg Seán Lemass
(1899–1971)
TD for Dublin South-Central
20 March
1957
23 June
1959
Fianna Fáil 8
(de Valera)
Industry and Commerce (1957–59)
Taoiseach (1959–66)
6 Seán MacEntee
(1889–1984)
TD for Dublin South-East
23 June
1959
21 April
1965
Fianna Fáil 9·10
(Lemass)
Health (1959–65)
7 Frank Aiken
(1898–1983)
TD for Louth
21 April
1965
2 July
1969
Fianna Fáil 11
(Lemass)
12
(Lynch)
External Affairs (1965–69)
8 Erskine H. Childers
(1905–1974)
TD for Monaghan
2 July
1969
14 March
1973
Fianna Fáil 13
(Lynch)
Health (1969–73)
President of Ireland (1973–74)
9 Brendan Corish
(1918–1990)
TD for Wexford
14 March
1973
5 July
1977
Labour Party 14
(L. Cosgrave)
Health (1973–77)
10 George Colley
(1925–1983)
TD for Dublin Clontarf
5 July
1977
30 June
1981
Fianna Fáil 15
(Lynch)
16
(Haughey)
Finance (1977–79)
Tourism and Transport (1979–80)
Energy (1980–81)
11 Michael O'Leary
(1936–2006)
TD for Dublin Central
30 June
1981
9 March
1982
Labour Party 17
(FitzGerald)
Energy (1981–82)
12 Ray MacSharry
(born 1938)
TD for Sligo–Leitrim
9 March
1982
14 December
1982
Fianna Fáil 18
(Haughey)
Finance (1982)
13 Irish Tánaiste Dick Spring at the White House, 16 Nov 1993.jpg Dick Spring
(born 1950)
TD for Kerry North
14 December
1982
20 January
1987
Labour Party 19
(FitzGerald)
Environment (1982–83)
Energy (1983–87)
14 Peter Barry
(1928–2016)
TD for Cork South-Central
20 January
1987
10 March
1987
Fine Gael Foreign Affairs (1987)
15 Brian Lenihan
(1930–1995)
TD for Dublin West
10 March
1987
31 October
1990
Fianna Fáil 20·21
(Haughey)
Foreign Affairs (1987–89)
Defence (1989–90)
16 John Wilson
(1923–2007)
TD for Cavan–Monaghan
13 November
1990
12 January
1993
Fianna Fáil 21
(Haughey)
Marine (1990–92)
22
(Reynolds)
Defence and Gaeltacht (1992–93)
(13) Irish Tánaiste Dick Spring at the White House, 16 Nov 1993.jpg Dick Spring
(born 1950)
TD for Kerry North
12 January
1993
17 November
1994
Labour Party 23
(Reynolds)
Foreign Affairs (1993–94)
17 BertieAhernBerlin2007-bis.jpg Bertie Ahern
(born 1951)
TD for Dublin Central
17 November
1994
15 December
1994
Fianna Fáil Finance (1994)
Taoiseach (1997–2008)
(13) Irish Tánaiste Dick Spring at the White House, 16 Nov 1993.jpg Dick Spring
(born 1950)
TD for Kerry North
15 December
1994
26 June
1997
Labour Party 24
(Bruton)
Foreign Affairs (1994–97)
18 Mary Harney cropped.jpg Mary Harney
(born 1953)
TD for Dublin South-West until 2002
TD for Dublin Mid-West from 2002
26 June
1997
13 September
2006
Progressive Democrats 25·26
(Ahern)
Enterprise, Trade and Employment (1997–2004)
Health and Children (2004–06)
19 McDowell says NO! (9826113044) (cropped).jpg Michael McDowell
(born 1951)
TD for Dublin South-East
13 September
2006
14 June
2007
Progressive Democrats 26
(Ahern)
Justice, Equality and Law Reform (2002–07)
20 Brian Cowen in Philadelphia.jpg Brian Cowen
(born 1960)
TD for Laois–Offaly
14 June
2007
7 May
2008
Fianna Fáil 27
(Ahern)
Finance (2007–08)
Taoiseach (2008–11)
21 Mary Coughlan.jpg Mary Coughlan
(born 1965)
TD for Donegal South-West
7 May
2008
9 March
2011
Fianna Fáil 28
(Cowen)
Enterprise, Trade and Employment (2008–10)
Education and Skills (2010–11)
Health and Children (2011)
22 Eamon Gilmore Conference 2010 cropped.jpg Eamon Gilmore
(born 1955)
TD for Dún Laoghaire
9 March
2011
4 July
2014
Labour Party 29
(Kenny)
Foreign Affairs and Trade (2011–14)
23 Joan Burton July 2014 (cropped).jpg Joan Burton
(born 1949)
TD for Dublin West
4 July
2014
6 May
2016
Labour Party Social Protection (2014–2016)
24 Frances Fitzgerald 2014.png Frances Fitzgerald
(born 1950)
TD for Dublin Mid-West
6 May
2016
28 November
2017
Fine Gael 30
(Kenny)
Justice and Equality (2014–17)
31
(Varadkar)
Business, Enterprise and Innovation (2017)
25 Simon Coveney, Minister of Defence (cropped).jpg Simon Coveney
(born 1972)
TD for Cork South Central
30 November
2017
Incumbent Fine Gael Foreign Affairs and Trade (2017–)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Sources[edit]

  • Connolly, Eileen (2005). "The government and the governmental system". In Coakley, John; Gallagher, Michael. Politics in the Republic of Ireland. Psychology Press. ISBN 9780415280662. Retrieved 20 April 2016.

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b Before the enactment of the 1937 Constitution of Ireland, the deputy head of government was referred to as the Vice-President of the Executive Council.
  2. ^ "TDs and Senators salaries". Houses of the Oireachtas. 1 January 2018. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  3. ^ "Tánaiste: definition of Tánaiste in Oxford dictionary (British & World English). Meaning, pronunciation and origin of the word". Oxford Language Dictionaries. Oxford University Press. 2013. Retrieved 30 November 2013.
  4. ^ "Role of the Taoiseach". Department of the Taoiseach. Retrieved 18 May 2012.
  5. ^ "Taoiseach names Coveney as new Tánaiste". RTÉ.ie. 30 November 2017. Retrieved 30 November 2017.
  6. ^ Article 28.7.1° of the Constitution of Ireland.
  7. ^ Article 28.6.2° and 28.6.3° of the Constitution of Ireland. [1]
  8. ^ Connolly 2005, pp.339–340
  9. ^ "Eithne Fitzgerald". Directory of Members. Oireachtas. Retrieved 20 April 2016.
  10. ^ Müller, Wolfgang C.; Strom, Kaare (2003). Coalition Governments in Western Europe. Oxford University Press. p. 149. ISBN 9780198297611. Retrieved 20 April 2016.