Talk:Anthony Trollope

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2003 post[edit]

what the heck is a pillar box.

It's a kind of UK post box. Usually bright red. Defined by http://www.rchme.gov.uk/thesaurus/mon_types/P/71139.htm as: "A hollow pillar, erected in a public place, containing a receptacle for posting letters."

I may be doing Catalyst a disservice here, but the recently-added paragraphs sound a little like something copied from a book. Can Catalyst please:

  1. Reassure us that they are not copyright
  2. Review the additions with regard to the NPOV policy

Deb 21:19 27 Jul 2003 (UTC)

May I also add a comment here. I have been away from the site for a considerable period of time, have however been working on a Trollope article. How much detail is required in an article? Catalyst's article reads very well but is rather short on detail. I add my work to the talk to start with, perhaps Catalyst or someone could either incorporate it or whatever.

Anthony Trollope British novelist April, 1815 - 6 December, 1882)

Anthony Trollope, born at 6 Keppel Street, Bloomsbury, London, was the fourth son of Frances Trollope, née Milton, herself a novelist of some eminence, and Thomas Anthony Trollope, a barrister. At the age of one the family moved to a house called Julians near Harrow expecting an inheritence from his great uncle that never came. The business fell off, as his father's temper alienated the clients.

In 1822 he became a day boy at Harrow School. He was the dunce of the class, dirty and badly-dressed. 1825 he transfered to Arthur Drury's private school at Sunbury. Two years later in 1827 he went to his father's old school, Winchester, where his older brother Thomas is a prefect. His mother goes to America, in on a plan to build a bazaar in Cincinnati, Ohio for the sale of English goods. This fails and causes the family's final ruin. In 1830 he has to return to Harrow school.

1832 his mother publishes Domestic Manners of the Americans, a satirical novel that, though widely disliked in America, becomes popular in Britan, enabling her to support the family. But in 1834 unable to win a university scholarship, family moved to Bruges, Belgium. There the family remain, his father dying in 1835, his older brother, Henry, and his younger sister, Emily, the following year.

Through influence of friends Trollope obtained in the autumn 1834 a junior clerk's job in the General Post Office, at £90 a year. He had seven lonely years of dingy poverty in London, making few friends and earning a reputation for insubordination, until his transfer in 1841 to Banagher, Ireland, as a deputy postal surveyor, put him financially at ease and introduced him to a larger, freer, outdoor life. His awkwardness disappeared; he took up fox-hunting (which he followed enthusiastically until 1878); and in June 1844 he married Rose Heseltine, daughter of a Rotherham bank-manager. 1859 promoted to a post in Mallow, Ireland, traveled on postal missions to western England in 1851, Belfast in 1853, Donnybrook near Dublin in 1854, and to Egypt, Scotland, and the West Indies in 1858-1859. Finally promoted to Surveyor General at £800 a year the family move to Waltham Cross (near London).

In 1847 his first novel, The Macdermots of Ballycloran, searching for the sources of Irish discontent was published. Next year saw the appearence of The Kellys and the O'Kellys. Neither of these did well. In 1855 The Warden, started in July 1852, the first in the series of the Barsetshire chronicles (1855-67) appeared.


In 1867 he retired from the Post Office, stood unsuccessfully for parliament as a Liberal and edited St Paul's Magazine, in which several of his were serialized.

He wrote 47 novels and 16 other books with sales often exceeding 100,000. In his autobiography, which appeared posthumously in 1883, his writings brought him £70,000.

The Macdermots of Ballycloran 1847
The Kellys and the O'Kellys 1848
The Warden 1855
The Three Clerks 1858
Doctor Thorne 1858
The Bertrams
Framely Parsonage 1861
Orley Farm 1862
The Small House at Allington 1864
Can You Forgive Her? 1864
The Belton Estate 1865
The Claverings 1867
The Last Chronicle of Barset 1867
Phineas Finn 1869
He knew he was right 1869
The Eustace Diamonds 1873
Phineas Redux 1874
The Way We Live Now 1875
The Prime Minister 1876
The American Senator 1877
Is He Popenjoy? 1878
The Duke's Children 1880
Ayala's Angel 1881
Dr. Wortel's School 1881
An Autobiography 1883


BigRat

Removal[edit]

Took out "Other novels include Cousin Henry and Dr Wortle's School, both probing psychological and moral studies in the vein of The Warden" These can hardly be considered his best work. Clarityfiend 05:55, 10 July 2006 (UTC)

Return to England[edit]

If he returned to England in 1859, as stated in the section "Time In Ireland", then the paragraph commencing His first major success came with The Warden (1855)... in "Return to England" is anachronistic and should be in the former section. jiHymas@himivest.com 216.191.217.90 20:15, 1 May 2007 (UTC)

proposed external link[edit]

I'd like to add a link like:

to the External Links section. This links to a list of Trollope books that you can download to read on a cell phone. I have read quite a few from this site and got a lot of value out being able to read the PD texts away from the PC.

The texts are Public Domain in the US, just like Project Gutenberg, they are packaged with the reader and available under a creative commons licence (share if (attribution, non-commercial, no derivative) ). The site is non-commercial without registration, subscription, or advertising. The texts as packaged together with the reader as a java program that runs on cell phones, this is a way for people to access the authors work that adds to the range in the existing external links (hopefully translating to more reading going on).

I checked WP:EL and the link seems appropriate:

  • What should be linked: '...should link to a site hosting a copy of the work if none of the "Links normally to be avoided" criteria apply.'
  • Links normally to be avoided: it seems only #8 might apply; 'Direct links to documents that require external applications (such as Flash or Java) to view the relevant content...'. The site lets you download java programs that only run on a J2ME environment, this means most/all current cell phones. So although they are limited to being read on a phone they do add an access method to all the others in the existing External Links, in the same way that LibriVox adds a format but requires an mp3 player.

Filomath 01:03, 26 August 2007 (UTC)

Time in Ireland[edit]

Ireland isn’t one place: shouldn’t the article say where specifically in Ireland Trollope lived and worked? I know he lived for a while in Belfast, and worked in its magnificent Custom House. But, since I’m benighted on the details, I hope some aficionados can add the specifics. Thanks. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Dedalus22 (talkcontribs) 08:36, 3 April 2009 (UTC)

Writing Style[edit]

Please, could some one add a section on Anthony Trollope writing style? thanks —Preceding unsigned comment added by 142.150.49.165 (talk) 18:08, 17 June 2010 (UTC) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernest_Hemingway#Writing_style

sp.: Londom[edit]

Please, someone who understands reflist, correct the spelling in note # 10. Ragityman (talk) 05:10, 31 August 2010 (UTC)

Pic[edit]

--INeverCry 22:04, 8 August 2011 (UTC)
--INeverCry 22:37, 8 August 2011 (UTC)


Here are some new pics of Trollope in case they're needed.

Block quotation from Henry James[edit]

There is a block quotation from Henry James in the "Works and reputation" section, attributed to "an essay shortly after the novelist's death." I searched for a source and found that the block quotation is pretty much faithful to James's compilation Partial Portraits, published in 1888 - see [1]. But the actual essay appeared in The Century in 1883 and has some significant wording changes - see [2]. Does anyone know the background on this - was it a habit of James to silently revise his works when republishing them? Which source should be direct-quoted here? More recent sources I have seen that quote this passage use the Partial Portraits version, and for now I will keep it in this article with ref to the source. Zariane (talk) 16:03, 18 September 2011 (UTC)

Project Gutenberg links[edit]

For future reference, I just put all of Project Gutenberg's Trollope ebooks into Wikipedia templates, and saved the results here. I've been through all the current articles and ensured that they have templates, but any new articles should also have a template added if possible. NotFromUtrecht (talk) 14:30, 10 March 2012 (UTC)

Biography[edit]

(Trollope's father) failed at the bar due to his bad temper. I am not at all clear what the editor concerned meant here but I don't think this is appropriate. Please would someone fix it. Eddaido (talk) 11:16, 24 July 2013 (UTC)