Talk:As I Opened Fire

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concern about copyvio in footnotes[edit]

This article, like others in this series on the works of Roy Lichtenstein contains excessively long quotations from other authors in the footnotes that may amount to copyvio. The author could have taken the time to understand and then reword the quotes in his original writing. Examples of authors excessive quoted:

from Diane Waldman
  • "...The painting describes and depicts a pilot opening fire on an enemy aircraft, elaborating on the excitement and confusion of those few seconds of battle. He changed none of the narrative text and altered little in the way the barrage of gunfire is conveyed by a series of exclamations—"BRAT!," "BRATATAT!," and "BRATA"—aside from changing the middle panel's "BRATATAT!" to "BRATATATATA!" and adding similarly to "BRATA" in the third panel (although the additional syllables are mostly hidden by the yellow band of narrative at the top). But he has tightened the organization of the three panels so that they cohere into one formal entity."
  • "As I Opened Fire, 1964,...Like the comic strip, the painting describes and depicts a pilot opening fire on an enemy aircraft, elaborating on the excitement and confusion of those few seconds of battle. Lichtenstein retained all of the narrative text and altered little in the way the barrage of gunfire is conveyed by a series of exclamations...But he tightened the organization of the three panels so that they cohere into one formal entity. In both the comic strip and the painting, the first image is that of the nose of the plane; the second is a close-up of the guns firing their rounds of ammunition; and the third, an even closer view, focuses in on the gunfire. While Liichtenstein did not change the sequence of events, he altered the way in which the images in the second and third panels were positioned to align them with one another on the picture plane...The sequence unfolds like a series of movie clips."
  • "Blam anticipates the resounding drama of subsequent war-comics paintings, culminating in such monumental canvases as Whaam! (fig. 90), 1963, and As I Opened Fire (fig. 91), 1964."
  • "The greater fragmentation results in an image even more abstract than the one in Whaam!"
  • "While Lichtenstein has not changed the sequence of events, he has altered the way in which the images in the second and third panels are positioned, so that they are aligned with one another on the picture plane. The images of the fighter plane and the gun barrels are all directed upward, and the narrative explains that the enemy was above the subject's—our hero's—aircraft. The sequence unfolds like a series of movie clips. As in Whaam!, the image shifts dramatically from frame to frame, and the additional third panel heightens the drama. The action and the images are fragmented, but even more so in Lichtenstein's isolated excerpt, with its single-minded concentration on a repetition of guns and their accompanying sounds."
Waldman 1993 is also quoted extensively in other, related articles, e.g. Yellow and Green Brushstrokes, Girl with Ball, Whaam!, Bedroom at Arles, Girl in Mirror, Golf Ball, Little Big Painting, Drowning Girl, Bedroom at Arles, As I Opened Fire, Artist's Studio—Look Mickey and others. Several authors are repeatedly quoted in the series of article on works by Lichtenstein, including Lawrence Alloway, Janis Hendrickson, and others.
from Alloway, Lawrence
  • "His formal imagination, however, is more at ease with tighter relationships, such as the triptych of 1964, As I Opened Fire. Here are three successive views of a plane: the first of the nose, then a closer view of the guns in the wings, and finally the barrels of the guns in huge close-up. The flaming gun nozzles are presented in each picture, getting larger and moving from lower left to upper right in sequence. The onomatopoeic words Brat or Bratatatata of the guns follow this movement, but in the center panel, the yellow letters of the work trail downward like the shower of ejected cartridge cases. Despite the cinematic flow of the images the sky varies: there is a purplish screen of dots on the left and a blue screen on the right, with a strong solid blue at center to give stability to the left-right sequence."
from Hendrickson
  • "Lichtenstein has said that he wanted his images to look as machine-made as possible, but deep in his heart he remained a painter. Unlike Andy Warhol, he almost never took photography as a basis for his work. He preferred to use impersonal hand-drawn figures. For example, the teen and action comics behind such paintings as M-maybe and As I Opened Fire (Ill. p. 28/29) were images produced by teams of illustrators who left no personal elements of style behind."

etc.

As there are quotes in the article also, the article (minus quotes) is shorter than the quotes. Is this the right thing? MathewTownsend (talk) 18:50, 21 July 2012 (UTC)

non free image needs to be reduced[edit]

See File:Look Mickey source.jpg. Thanks, MathewTownsend (talk) 20:15, 21 July 2012 (UTC)