Talk:Between the Lines (TV series)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Guide to political correctness in Britain[edit]

Between the lines is a carefully casted and beautifully shot drama that seemed to capture the changing values of the times (1992-1994) as The Sweeney did before it in 1974. It also involved some of the finest British TV character actors eg Ian postelthwait or Daniel Craig or Ian Holm.

One of the core themes is - the advancement of graduate career officers (flyers) at the expense of less 'politically correct' officers and, arguably, at the expense of justice. Within the context of policing 'political correctness' carries with it a menace which, in this show, is decided by journalists and politicians and then played out in the violent and dramatic cut and thrust between rival officers and rival villains.

The witchhunt mentality that seemed to pervade the police service in the early 90s helps to explain why 'law and order' in the UK appeared to become an outmoded concept at that time; in one scene a senior officer admits the crown prosecution service (cps) is more likely to try him on false allegations than those fabricating the allegations ie. the cps would take the opportunity for a 'show trial' to prove how the met was being purged of any impropriety.

82.71.116.198 10:01, 20 June 2007 (UTC)


Guide to 1990s police slang. I have decided to go through the series and explain jargon as best I can - for my own interest but it may help

Blag, as in a holding up an off license to rob the till, or robbing a bank
Nonce, someone who interferes with children
Ponce, aka pimp; provider of prostitutes
Nark, as in copper's nark - an informer
Verballed, as in 'verbal him up' putting words into someone elses mouth to effect a confession
Putting the black on ####, this means alleging treachery in someone else
Fingering ####, this means pointing out a miscreant to someone in authority

---to be completed--

Citizenclive76 18:41, 1 August 2007 (UTC)

Putting the black on ####, This actually means blackmailing someone. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 77.97.72.235 (talk) 22:07, 24 September 2008 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just modified one external link on Between the Lines (TV series). Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, please set the checked parameter below to true or failed to let others know (documentation at {{Sourcecheck}}).

You may set the |checked=, on this template, to true or failed to let other editors know you reviewed the change. If you find any errors, please use the tools below to fix them or call an editor by setting |needhelp= to your help request.

  • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
  • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.

If you are unable to use these tools, you may set |needhelp=<your help request> on this template to request help from an experienced user. Please include details about your problem, to help other editors.

Cheers.—InternetArchiveBot (Report bug) 05:18, 1 November 2016 (UTC)