Talk:Chef

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"Chef" Etymology[edit]

I am no Linguist but it seemed to me that most western languages etymology, especially french words are never thought of as loaned words from other cultures. Seems easy enough to see that "caput" or variants of it in Latin may seem lacking in mutation of word to form Chef/Chief. Following this reasoning, I asked around for quite a few native speaker of different languages, I've found quite a few resemblance, especially into East Asian ones.

Few East Asian term more closely sounding to the word Chef/Chief and might be closer in definition than as discussed in the article which loosely translate to "head".

  • In Japanese, シフ(kana)/師父(kanji)/"shifu"(romanji) - meaning elder/more of an expert. which is a loan word from Chinese (general).
  • In Korean, 사부(hangul)/師父(hanja)/"Sabu" - meaning boss/leader/teacher
  • In Chinese 師父 -or- 師傅 (traditional) 师父 -or- 师傅 (Simplified)
    • Cantonese/similar dialects,(Jyutping: "si1fu2")
    • Mandarin/similar dialects,(Pingyin: "shīfù")
    • Fujian/Taiwan/similar dialects,( yindu: "sai-hū")
    • All variants pertain to teacher / master / expert / model / father figure / qualified worker.

I think it is worth a mention, although it may be a coincidence, an unlikely one, as i could see much more words are like this. I suggest searching for the words (characters), as the information is far more abundant than air (wink), Thanks for your time reading.

112.208.222.85 (talk) 19:45, 29 January 2014 (UTC)

See (French) Wiktionairy - Caput that explains that the French word "Caput" is identical to the German word "Haupt" or the English word "Chief" of "head". I have altered the text a bit to make it clear and remove a USA-bias. The Banner talk 20:17, 29 January 2014 (UTC)

Country Specific[edit]

Some of the sentences are specific to USA like : "It is currently legal in all 50 states to be an Executive Chef without any credentials." under "Chef de cuisine, executive chef, chef manager, head chef, and master chef" Ashish Sharma (talk) 09:24, 9 March 2015 (UTC)

cuisinier/cook[edit]

Cuisinier means cook not chef because chef means head as in head chef or chef de cuisine. Or chef means head of a department or group as in chef patisserie/pastry chef or chef de partie. That being said, a cook is not a chef. But a chef may be a cook. Chef is a designation that should be used only to annotate someone who holds some authority in a classically trained brigade. Andrewmoore72 (talk) 05:18, 20 July 2016 (UTC)

Indeed, the opening sentence of the article completely disregards the difference, saying that a chef is "a highly trained and professional cook." 129.42.208.182 (talk) 20:00, 10 August 2016 (UTC)