Talk:Dementia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Medicine / Translation / Neurology (Rated B-class, Top-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Medicine, which recommends that medicine-related articles follow the Manual of Style for medicine-related articles and that biomedical information in any article use high-quality medical sources. Please visit the project page for details or ask questions at Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Medicine.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Top  This article has been rated as Top-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the Translation task force (marked as High-importance).
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the Neurology task force (marked as Mid-importance).
 
WikiProject Psychology (Rated Start-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Psychology, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Psychology on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Cognitive science  
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Cognitive science, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Cognitive science on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 

Suggestions for more content[edit]

What about Wernicke's encephalopathy, and Korsakoff's syndrome?

And I happen to be looking for a full list of the aetiology of dementia. Would be very grateful for any pointers/links to such a list.

Thanks

Disorientation[edit]

With regards to disorientation I'm taking the week part out of time - it's disorientation to not know the day of the week, maybe day of the month, but how many people can tell you which week of the year it is?

Cerebral Health Website[edit]

As director of the cerebralhealth.com website, I would like to offer an appeal to the editors of this page to include a link to either the homepage at http://www.cerebralhealth.com or to the Brain Research and Information Network (B.R.A.I.N.) at http://www.cerebralhealth.com/neuroscienceresearch.php

Need Help Identifying Whether There is a Typo[edit]

In the section on "Progressive supranuclear palsy", in the sentence 'The person may also have certain "frontal lobe signs" such as perseveration, a grasp reflex and utilization behavior (the need to use an object once you see it)', I'm not sure if there is supposed to be a comma after 'grasp reflex' and before 'and utilization behavior'. I have been noticing a large amount of missing commas (e.g., "one, two and three" as opposed to "one, two, and three"), but for this particular instance, I'm not sure if 'grasp reflex' and 'utilization behavior' go together. I don't think they do, and I think the comma is supposed to be there, but I don't want to add it in case I'm wrong, because I don't know enough about either one of those topics to be sure whether or not they go together. This is why that extra comma is important, and this is why not including it can be misleading, and this is why I have been adding it everywhere I see it missing when it is grammatically necessary. Anyone have any insight? Thanks! 108.34.228.32 (talk) 07:50, 21 November 2015 (UTC)

This is actually a style issue, as explained in our article on the Oxford comma. The relevant Wikipedia policy is explained at MOS:OXFORD. The bottom line is that each article can choose whether it wants to use "serial commas", but within any given article we should try to be consistent. Changing the style of an article should be avoided unless clear consensus is gained beforehand. Looie496 (talk) 12:43, 21 November 2015 (UTC)

Possible Rewording of "Eating Difficulties" Section?[edit]

In the first part, it mentions that feeding tubes are associated with a few things (need for chemical/physical restraints, possibility of pressure ulcers, etc.), and then just two or so sentences later, it says possible risks are (and then restates everything that it said above). To me, this seems redundant and seems that it should be reworded. I can't really think of a better way to word it, but if anyone else agrees with me, please try and find a way to make this section better. Thanks! 108.34.228.32 (talk) 08:30, 21 November 2015 (UTC)

"A person's consciousness is not affected."[edit]

Dementia can profoundly disturb and alter consciousness. How on earth is this sentence in the introduction of the article.131.191.57.0 (talk)

Dementia and delerium are different. Per WHO "It affects memory, thinking, orientation, comprehension, calculation, learning capacity, language, and judgement. Consciousness is not affected. " [1] Doc James (talk ·

contribs · email) 23:43, 10 January 2016 (UTC)


I can read that quote but it's simply not true. The article associates all these symptoms with dementia, and most of them would not occur without changes to consciousness: "Agitation, Depression, Anxiety, Abnormal motor behavior, Elated mood, Irritability, Apathy, Disinhibition and impulsivity, Delusions (often believing people are stealing from them) or hallucinations"

Lewy-body dementia, in particular, is associated with profound changes in consciousness: "Disturbances of consciousness, including fluctuations in attention and awareness, are a common and clinically important symptom in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB)." (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12435378) 131.191.57.0 (talk)

Yes okay while most types of dementia and most causes of dementia consciousness is not affected in some types it is [2] Doc James (talk · contribs · email) 01:44, 11 January 2016 (UTC)