Talk:Hungarian Revolution of 1956

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Featured article Hungarian Revolution of 1956 is a featured article; it (or a previous version of it) has been identified as one of the best articles produced by the Wikipedia community. Even so, if you can update or improve it, please do so.
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edit·history·watch·refresh Stock post message.svg To-do list for Hungarian Revolution of 1956:

Here are some tasks awaiting attention:
  • Cleanup : *Check the the infobox for correctness Ilyaroz (talk) 22:13, 6 December 2008 (UTC)
  • Expand : *Write a paragraph about the social unrest during the 50th anniversary. Mieciu K 20:11, 12 November 2006 (UTC).
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Image/Copyright recommendation[edit]

These images with dubious copyright are removed from the article space pending their status being sorted out:

[[Image:May Day Parade 1957 Moscow.jpg|thumb |300px |alt=Seven men standing and waving behind a block wall, four of which are waving hats in the air |Seven members of the Soviet Presidium at 1957 May Day Parade (left to right): Georgy Zhukov (Candidate member), Nikita Khrushchev, Nikolai Bulganin, Lazar Kaganovich, Georgy Malenkov, Vyacheslav Molotov, and Anastas Mikoyan]]

File:MindszentyPlaza Cleveland.JPG
Memorial to the Hungarian revolutionaries in Cleveland, Ohio

Revolt against their Jewish torturers[edit]

What this article completely omits is that the Hungarian revolution was initially an anti-semitic uprising. It was an uprising by Hungarians against their Jewish torturers. That's how it started out. When Soviet troops advanced into middle and western Europe destroying, raping and murdering everything and everyone in sight, they brought with them the Hungarian Jews that had gone to Moscow for training before the war began. These Jews got all the top jobs in Hungary after the war. Farkas, Gerö, Rákosi, Révai et al. were all Jews and they were the police chiefs and torturers of the Hungarian people.

CIA interviews with Hungarians that left Hungary revealed that the Hungarian people viewed their government as Jewish government, which essentially it was. This has been thoroughly researched and documented in David Irving's "Uprising! Hungary 1956: One Nation's Nightmare" https://irvingbooks.com/xcart/product.php?productid=17590&cat=3&page=1

When wikipedia cover's this up it reveals a deep bias in all of its coverage of all similar topics (WW II, Isreali-Palestine conflict)Pgg804 (talk) 15:12, 20 December 2012 (UTC)

Ah! David Irving! Sorry, but that self-described historian is not taken serious over here.Jeff5102 (talk) 20:39, 7 February 2013 (UTC)
And Wikipedia shouldn't be taken seriously either. I heartily second Pgg804's comments above. You'll never find any admission of it in Wikipedia, but there was indeed an anti-Jewish aspect to the Hungarian uprising. Hungarians were deeply resentful of the Communists' heavy hand, and they were well aware of the prominence of Jews in the upper ranks of their nation's Communist regime. (Pgg804 names a few of them.) The hated secret services, in particular, were run by Jews. Say what you like about David Irving (personally, I think he's his own worst enemy), but if you're serious about learning about this fascinating episode you should read his book. Don't believe what the court historians want to feed you. And for heaven's sake don't take Wikipedia's word for anything! No, not even this. 38.115.185.4 (talk) 16:54, 2 May 2013 (UTC)HelenChicago

I have herd in the UK's media that a mixture of oppressed, open-minded, pro-democracy students; Slav-phobic, fascist, anti-Semitic, World War 2 political veterans and "Horthyite Clerical-Fascist Arrow-Crossers" had started it, but that the students had most public support by the end.90.244.88.190 (talk) 18:15, 17 December 2013 (UTC)

Request for an Administrator to "hat" this discussion as it adds nothing of value to the article and reeks of anti-semitic bile. Thanks. HammerFilmFan (talk) 12:15, 23 October 2013 (UTC)
Well, there are strong anti-semitic views in Hungary, whether anyone likes it or not. Also in our times. Hungarian soldiers fought with Nazi Germany on the East Front free-willingly and out of a strong ideological commitment. If I remember correctly Hungary even had panzer divisions at Stalingrad. Omitting both anti-semitic and fascist fractions when describing this uprising (or anything political in Hungary for that matter), is both foolish and very wrong. It is historical fraud. RhinoMind (talk) 13:33, 4 June 2015 (UTC)
Here is a wiki-link to start with: Hungary in World War II. RhinoMind (talk) 13:42, 4 June 2015 (UTC)

Casualties[edit]

The number of casualties in the infobox is ununderstandable now to the casual visitor: please clarify!Super48paul (talk) 12:43, 14 September 2013 (UTC).

Mongolia[edit]

This forum user http://www.eagleforum.org/column/2006/oct06/06-10-18.html raised something I heard at school in the 1980's- that Mongolia helped the USSR crush the rebellion. Can this be resolved.The Northaptonshire pins (talk) 18:53, 17 December 2013 (UTC)

Communist revolution?[edit]

Couldn't this be considered a communist revolution? The narrative seems to suggest that the revolutionaries were calling for a socialist system free of strict party controll, a soviet democracy, something along the lines of council communism. Charles Essie (talk) 03:56, 12 January 2014 (UTC)

From what I just read, during the 50s and 60s the tendency among Soviet dissidents was to defend "socialism with a human face" and so not question the ideal of communism altogether (this changed during the 70s when the ideas of human rights, civil society and totalitarianism gained ground). Therefore you could call them "communist", as long as you don't identify it with the existing Russian/Stalinist regime. Ogoidbr (talk) 22:04, 11 February 2014 (UTC)
It was a mumbo-jumbo of political leanings and some fractions didn't had any political interests whatsoever. What Charles Essie describes was true for some people and with regard to Ogoidbr's comment, I would dub them socialist rebels. But they were not in control of things and poorly organized politically, if at all. In fact I think it is wrong to call this uprising a revolution at all. First of all because there wasn't any revolution taking place, but also because the people engaged, wasn't striving for anything in particular, when viewed in total. RhinoMind (talk) 14:09, 4 June 2015 (UTC)

Soviet version of events[edit]

It is interesting that the Soviet view: "Fascist, Hitlerite, reactionary, counter-revolutionary hooligans financed by the imperialist west took advantage of the unrest to stage a counter-revolution" sounds remarkably like the line the Kremlin is using with respect to the recent events in Ukraine.Royalcourtier (talk) 22:08, 12 October 2014 (UTC)

Yes, good point. And it is not coincidental. Russia and in particular Putins regimes, are still living in the power struggles of the Cold War era. It is part of Russia's modern identity as a nation and as a people as well. It does not have much to do with political ideologies any more, even tough that was what started it all. nowadays it is just the power struggle itself that is left. And it is a very important aspect of the mindset and attitudes of Russia and Russian people of today. I do not think we could blame Russia much in this respect, as USA and Europe are still actively proceeding the political agendas of containment towards Russia, just as they did during the Cold War. Nothing has changed with regard to this continuing power struggle. Now the ideologies are just not there anymore, it is just about money, power and control.
Lesson: It is always rewarding to understand a conflict from as many viewpoints as possible.
Here is a few relevant links: [1], [2]
RhinoMind (talk) 13:58, 4 June 2015 (UTC)