Talk:Medical model of disability

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Who invented this model?[edit]

Mike Oliver, who coined the term social model of disability claims that there is no such thing as the medical model of disability. So who invented this model and where is it defined? Is it real or just a strawman model that proponents of the social model for target practice? Without answers to these questions, the article is not very credible. --ChristopheS (talk) 14:48, 4 September 2009 (UTC)

The medical model in fact predates the social model. See [1]. I've been staring at the phrase "medical model of disability" but its only when I stated searching for "medical model" without "of disability" that a whole new bunch of sources have become apparent - try it.
The "inventor" of the term/concept Medical model was R. D. Laing. Laing formulated it in terms of his opposition to orthodox psychiatry but the model is broadly applicable to the orthodoxy of modern scientifically based allopathic medicine in general. Laing published the concept before Oliver and the Union of the Physically Impaired Against Segregation came up with the Social model of disability. Roger (talk) 11:52, 29 November 2010 (UTC)

A few possible sources for this article[edit]

Ok, that's enough for now, it's way past bedtime here... Roger (talk) 23:08, 28 November 2010 (UTC)

Another one - http://www.museumstuff.com/learn/topics/medical_model Roger (talk) 12:04, 29 November 2010 (UTC)

going to close the merger proposal shortly[edit]

Given Roger's "motherlode/load", etc., I'm going to close out the merger proposal. Roger, I trust you'll do what you can on your own time to integrate the sources you found into their respective spots in this article..? Just thought I'd mention it. Thanks all. Kikodawgzzz (talk) 05:58, 2 December 2010 (UTC)

The word is "lode", it's a geological term meaning the main vein of ore. See Mother lode. "Load" is something entirely different. LOL! Roger (talk) 06:28, 2 December 2010 (UTC)
Well, I wasn't talking about a sexual 'load', I was talking about "load" in the sense of "a load of something" as in "many/much of something". :) But okay, thanks for that, because now, I know the meaning of "lode", which I did not know before. I have learned something new today!! hehe... Kikodawgzzz (talk)

Possible Contributor[edit]

Inspired Motivator194 (talk) 21:46, 29 April 2015 (UTC) I am hoping to contribute to this page. User:Inspired_Motivator194/Individual Model of Disability