Talk:Pineal gland

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Anatomy (Rated B-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Anatomy, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Anatomy on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article has been classified as relating to organs.
 
WikiProject Animal anatomy (Rated B-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is part of WikiProject Animal anatomy, an attempt to organise a detailed guide to all topics related to animal anatomy apart from human anatomy. To participate, you can edit the attached article, or contribute further at WikiProject Animal anatomy. This project is an offshoot of WikiProject Animals
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Neuroscience (Rated B-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Neuroscience, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Neuroscience on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Physiology (Rated Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Physiology, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Physiology on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article has not yet been associated with a particular area.
 

Images[edit]

I think this article is in desperate need of images. The description of where this important gland sounds like ancient Greek to someone that knows nothing about the brain and it's anatomy. JoeHenzi 18:40, 5 Apr 2005 (UTC)

Blood Pressure[edit]

The third paragraph under "Functions" starts with, 'It also contains a substance which if injected intravenously causes fall of blood-pressure.' Is this supposed to refer to the correlation between blood pressure and Melatonin production?

The description in "Functions" is vague. Melatonin usally increases potassium channel conductance thereby slowing down the heart rate and possibly relaxing the endothelium (haven't checked this). moosattack

Fluoride[edit]

There is no reputable evidence that fluoride has any influence on humman sexual maturity. In fact, the contrary exists. So, let's just drop this line in the article until peer-reviewed data is available.

Removed section[edit]

I have removed the following section from the article. This is primary research (WP:MEDRS). --LT910001 (talk) 03:06, 23 February 2014 (UTC)

Role in dimethyltryptamine production

Dr. Rick Strassman, who conducted research on the psychedelic dimethyltryptamine (DMT) in the 1990s at the University of New Mexico, has speculated that the pineal gland plays a role in the production of DMT in the human brain. Strassman has also advanced the controversial hypothesis that a massive release of DMT from the pineal gland prior to death, or near death, can result in a near-death experience (NDE). Strassman has suggested that the pineal gland is responsible for DMT production because enzymatic material needed to produce DMT is found there (see evidence in mammals) in substantially greater concentrations than in any other part of the body, Strassman (p. 69; Strassman, Rick J. (2001). DMT: The Spirit Molecule. A Doctor's Revolutionary Research into the Biology of Near-Death and Mystical Experiences. Rochester, Vt: Park Street. ISBN 978-0-89281-927-0.  ("Chapter summaries". Retrieved 27 February 2012. )). In 2013, researchers first reported DMT in the pineal gland microdialysate of rodents.Barker SA, Borjigin J, Lomnicka I, Strassman R (Jul 2013). "LC/MS/MS analysis of the endogenous dimethyltryptamine hallucinogens, their precursors, and major metabolites in rat pineal gland microdialysate". Biomed Chromatogr. doi:10.1002/bmc.2981. PMID 23881860. 

I have replaced the said removed section.WP:MEDRS recommends the removal of primary sources where they conflict with the conclusions found in secondary research articles:

If the conclusions of the research are worth mentioning, they should be described as being from a single study, for example:

"A 2009 U.S. study found the average age of formal autism spectrum diagnosis was 5.7 years." (citing PMID 19318992) After enough time has passed for a review in the area to be published, the review should be cited in preference to the primary study. Using a secondary source often allows the fact to be stated with greater reliability: "In the U.S., the average age of formal autism spectrum diagnosis is 5.7 years." (citing a review)

Furthermore WP:MEDRS states:

"Assessing evidence quality" means that editors should determine the quality of the type of study. Editors should not perform a detailed academic peer review. Do not reject a high-quality type of study due to personal objections to the study's inclusion criteria, references, funding sources, or conclusions.

Please refer to the archived Pineal Gland and DMT discussions before deeming the entire section not worth mentioning. Spincredulous (talk) 04:32, 5 March 2014 (UTC)


I don't think I'm qualified to make edits, but it seems that someone put a lot of woo-woo and pseudoscience. I hope someone can fix this. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Machib77 (talkcontribs) 12:52, 29 January 2015 (UTC)

I have removed that material once again, it clearly does not belong here. The most that could possibly be justified on that topic would be one sentence, and really even that doesn't belong. Looie496 (talk) 17:54, 30 January 2015 (UTC)
I disagree. We should have some treatment of Strassman and his research in this article. Perhaps not as lengthy as the version that was removed. However, this is well-referenced work from a notable scientist. Andrevan@ 03:00, 10 March 2015 (UTC)

Drug metabolism section[edit]

This section seems to have little to say about the role of the pineal gland in drug metabolism and much to say about Dr. Rick Strassman's book. Almost every citation in the section refers to DMT: The Spirit Molecule. I would suggest that this entire section be rewritten and drastically reduced, but I have a specific issue with the passage stating Strassman's belief that the gland arrises from tissues in the fetal mouth. According to the textbook "Histology and Cell Biology",Kierszenbaum, Abraham; Tres, Laura (2012). Histology and Cell Biology (3rd ed.). Elsevier/Mosby. ISBN 978-0-323-07842-9. Retrieved 27 August 2014.  the gland forms as an evagination of the diencephalon. At the very least, I would add that information somewhere, possibly under Structure->Development. I'm fine with editing it myself, but, especially as a novice, I wanted to raise the issue here first. --Jasononeal (talk) 21:59, 27 August 2014 (UTC)

I've got issues with the following sentence: "It becomes visible in the developing fetus at forty-nine days after conception. This is also the time in which one can clearly see an indication of either a female or male gender." First, this should probably read "female or male sex", as gender is now considered a social construct, not an anatomical state. Second, one cannot "clearly" deduce the sex of a human fetus until the second trimester, typically between 16 and 20 weeks by standard ultrasound -- not 7 weeks. The gonadal ridge becomes faintly perceptible around day 49, but fetal sex determination is only 90% accurate between weeks 9 and 10, and hits 100% around week 13 [1]. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.130.25.105 (talk) 06:57, 2 October 2014 (UTC)

What a calcified pineal gland looks like[edit]

https://usahitman.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/calc_pineal_500.jpg — Preceding unsigned comment added by 172.56.12.76 (talk) 03:43, 9 April 2015 (UTC)