Talk:Quantum algorithm

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Experimental Quantum Computing to Solve Systems of Linear Equations[edit]

Maybe we should add something about this: Experimental Quantum Computing to Solve Systems of Linear Equations

--Vitalij zad (talk) 14:39, 29 August 2013 (UTC)

It took six years, yet I just added something on this. 107.0.94.194 (talk) 21:45, 14 February 2019 (UTC)

Quantum / Classical 'equivalence'?[edit]

"All problems which can be solved on a quantum computer can be solved on a classical computer."

Although the above may be true in some abstract mathematical sense, I don't think it is true in reality.

David Deutsch describes, in 'The Fabric of Reality' some problems which could be rapidly solved by a quantum computer that could not be solved by any classical computer that could ever conceivably be constructed. (Put another way: classical computers could solve any problem a quantum computer could solve, it the universe didn't impose the constraints that it actually *does* impose.) At the moment, I think the lead into this article might suggest that quantum computers are a bit (or a *lot*) faster than classical computers - but really, it is more than that: quantum computers can actually solve, in the physical universe, problems that will never, ever be solved (in our actual, real universe - as opposed to an abstract, hypothetical one) by a classical computer. 62.232.250.50 (talk) 18:37, 10 January 2014 (UTC)

BQP-complete[edit]

Perhaps the article should explain the BQP acronym (I think I can guess, but...) 62.232.250.50 (talk) 19:00, 10 January 2014 (UTC)

"Exponential speedup"[edit]

It is extremely common to use "exponential speedup" very loosely, and say that Shor's algorithm provides an exponential speedup over GNFS. However, given that GNFS already provides sub-exponential factoring (that is, faster than $$c^n$$ for any $$c > 0$$), we should probably change the last sentence in the leading paragraph which claims that Shor's algorithm provides an "exponential speedup". Thoughts?

I changed the lede to say "much (almost exponentially) faster" rather than "exponentially faster". Sanpitch (talk) 20:31, 19 March 2019 (UTC)