Talk:Solid-state lighting

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nice work, recommend citing sources[edit]

Houdini,

When I first read the new article, I thought it was strongly POV, and would need some significant edits to be encyclopedic style. But the edits over the last day or so made a big difference. I find the article much better balanced now.

One thing that would add a lot to the article would be citations for as many as possible of the performance landmarks or predictions for the future (e.g. "will be introduced in most homes by 2020" as in the LED article)

--The Photon 03:42, 11 November 2005 (UTC)

When?[edit]

Just wondering what is the time frame on SSLs will be hitting the market on the large scale? I've heard 2020 yet that seems a little bit too conservative. Anyone know? Caleb rosenberg 01:46, 3 April 2006 (UTC)

Article needs updating (future is now)[edit]

White diodes were developed by reasearchers in the last few years (in contrast to the last paragraph in the article), light fixtures are currently available for consumers.

Dogears (talk) 04:07, 3 April 2006 (UTC)

Strange wording[edit]

It is the newest lighting technology to emerge in over 40 years is a bit of an odd sentence. If it's the newest in over 40 years then surely it's also the newest in 17384 years or whatever. What is the author tring to say here? EdDavies 21:57, 17 April 2006 (UTC)

I believe what's meant is it's the first new lighting technology to emerge in over 40 years. I've changed it to reflect that. TomTheHand 17:35, 17 May 2006 (UTC)

Life of incandescent bulb[edit]

I believe using the world record for longest bulb life to indicate the life of an incandescent bulb is inappropriate. Does anyone have any figures for typical incandescent bulb life? TomTheHand 17:35, 17 May 2006 (UTC)

Commercial, non-long-life, conventional incandescent lamps all seem to be rated in the range of 750 to 1000 hours. Quartz-halogen lamps seem to be rated at about 2000 hours on average. (And I'm sure you understand that these numbers are all deliberate design trade-offs between life and energy efficiency/color temperature so...) Long-life incandescent lamps range up to arbitrary values.
Atlant 17:43, 17 May 2006 (UTC)
I went ahead and reverted the table back to its original state before it was filled with cherry-picked marketing and world records. I think this is best, as it was intended to be a comparison of typically available items. TomTheHand 17:49, 17 May 2006 (UTC)
Note that I'm not opposed to an updated table, but I don't think the previous update was done well. I'm also somewhat opposed to making selective edits to a table that a source (in this case, Sandia National Laboratories) created and that we're using in full. TomTheHand

Missing Environment section[edit]

no mercury, some phosfor, there seems to be a way to fabricate the leds without phosfor as wel. Mion 13:47, 7 March 2007 (UTC)

to led lamp[edit]

i'm moving the Led lamp info to its own article. Mion 23:27, 16 March 2007 (UTC)

Why? These two articles Solid-state lighting and LED lamp appear to be about the same thing - is there a solid-state lamp that isn't some kind of diode? Should be merged again, it would make the LED lamp article better to have this material there. --Wtshymanski (talk) 18:55, 26 February 2008 (UTC)
yes, solid state lighting is LED , OLED and PLED, why would you want to merge it into only 1 article ? merge it into all 3 then. Mion (talk) 20:22, 28 February 2008 (UTC)
Well, OLED and PLED are the same article and could be linked from LED lamp, if they are in fact used for lighting and not graphic displays. Solid-state lighting and LED lamp should be the same article, though - with links to LED, and OLED where necessary. --Wtshymanski (talk) 00:38, 29 February 2008 (UTC)
No, LED is per definition a solid state lighting, but NOT the other way around, solid state lighting could be LED or OLED, thats why you can't merge it. Cheers. Mion (talk) 14:06, 29 February 2008 (UTC)
But an OLED is just a kind of LED. --Wtshymanski (talk) 19:01, 29 February 2008 (UTC)
An OLED is a type of solid state lighting, just like LED, its not the same as LED. Cheers. Mion (talk) 07:26, 2 March 2008 (UTC)

Reorganizing LED-related pages[edit]

There are 23 different LED-related pages, and I think there should be less than half that many. I've started a discussion on this at Talk:Light-emitting_diode#An_absurd_number_of_articles_involving_light-emitting_diodes; please come and join in. -- Dan Griscom (talk) 03:08, 3 March 2009 (UTC)

Term: "solid-state"[edit]

Copied from a recent edit description:

Removed - "The term is technically a misnomer as incandescent filament bulbs are solid state light sources as well." This is not true, solid-state refers to the use of semiconductors.

I read wikipedia and a few dictionaries on solid-state; specifically solid-state (electronics) as that seemed to be the meaning closest to what you meant. I think more of those definitions would include a filament than not. It's true that the term was popularized by its use in distinguishing transistors and the like from vacuum tubes and the like. But there were radios made from non-semiconducting solids, so the question didn't arise at the time. The best argument I can think of for not calling an incandescent a solid-state lamp is that the filament is thermally insulated by a fill gas or a vacuum. Making an incandescent lamp without a gas or a vacuum would be quite tricky.

My conclusion is that the disputed sentence should go back in but I'd like to hear other opinions.Ccrrccrr (talk) 02:25, 20 July 2009 (UTC)

If you want to use definitions as justification, I suggest saying that it is the special properties of these solid state materials that make them usable for lighting. Filaments are i reality just hot items, anything hot can in principle be used for incandescent lighting. But the term is still more or less dependent on knowing the meaning of solid state electronics--Thorseth (talk) 13:36, 28 August 2009 (UTC)

LED Lighting main advantages[edit]

LED Lighting main advantages is energy saving that it can save over 60% electricity cost, in the first year, the saved electricity cost is enough to buy a new LED light, in the rest of years, it will help you save a big of money, and is long lifespan over 50,000 hours, almost it is maintenance free for us, espically it will avoid a lot of troubles in our life and enhance our life quality. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Cimoonled (talkcontribs) 08:19, 24 May 2010 (UTC)