Talk:Villanelle

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Untitled[edit]

I'm planning a major rewrite. Draft at User:Bmills/Villanelle.

Text as overwritten by Bmills 14:54, 18 Dec 2003 (UTC):

A villanelle (or occasionally villonelle) is a poem of nineteen lines, named for the French poet François Villon (1431-1474). It consists of five stanzas of three lines each (rhyme scheme A B A) with a quatrain (A B A A) at the end. In addition to the rhyme scheme, the first and third lines alternately recur throughout, and are repeated as the last two lines of the quatrain. An example of a villanelle is Edwin Arlington Robinson's The House On The Hill.

Originally a French poetic form, it is not easily adaptable to English (a notable exception being Dylan Thomas' "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night".)

Confusion[edit]

Please define A1 and A2 more succinctly.

Or at least use the same notation in the description (A1, A2) as in the diagram (a,a,a) -- 23 September 2006 (UTC)

Re: Confusion[edit]

I'll put the explanation of A1 and A2 back in and try to make it clearer.

--Amanda French 16:06, 16 March 2007 (UTC)

Slate linked to this article[edit]

http://www.slate.com/id/2128464/tap2/ Kind of cool!

Here's what it said:

The thank-you note, however, is a difficult form, only slightly less tricky than the villanelle.

(Narkstraws 01:27, 22 October 2005 (UTC))

Copyright?[edit]

Do we have the proper copyright to quote an entire poem of Sylvia Plath's? I don't think that's public domain... --Khazar 17:45, 23 January 2006 (UTC)

I took out the copyrighted poems myself awhile ago. --Amanda French 16:02, 16 March 2007 (UTC)

Same question regarding the Dylan Thomas poem: I doubt that's in the public domain. Are we allowed to post the entire piece here? --Zaklog 00:07, 22 April 2007 (UTC)

Yeah, people keep putting "Do not go gentle into that good night" up there in full, but it's got to be copyrighted! I think it even has its own wikipedia article. Stephen Fry's great book The Hippopotamus is narrated by a poet who bemoans how fast poetry goes into the "public" domain . . . I'll replace it with Edwin Arlington Robinson's "The House on the Hill" again. Sisyphean, this task. --Amanda French 02:18, 24 April 2007 (UTC)

For a variation, instead of removing "Do not go gentle..." entirely, I've left the first tercet and a link to a web site where one may legitimately read the full poem. We'll see how long that holds. --Paul A 07:36, 10 May 2007 (UTC)

Thanks, Paul A! Great idea. --Amanda French 16:14, 30 May 2007 (UTC)

Credit where it's due: I got the idea from when Martin Wisse did it for his modern villanelle example. --Paul A 01:37, 31 May 2007 (UTC)