Talk:Women in Nazi Germany

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Translation from French Wikipedia[edit]

Translation of article "Femmes sous le Troisieme Reich" from the French Wikipedia, also the German Wikipedia article on the same topic. Added some updated sources and external links.

OttawaAC (talk) 21:23, 21 August 2011 (UTC)

Image[edit]

I removed the image File:Ssaufseherin-uniform.jpg, captioned Drawing representing an Aufseherin in uniform, because it was historically inaccurate and represented a modern re-imagining of an Aufseherin's uniform based on - inaccurate - post-war representations in movies. Examples include the use of the death's-head insignia on the field cap, which was only used on men's caps; the colour of the cap, which for women was made of black wool, not grey as depicted; the use of a man's belt; the lack of a pocket badge, which for women was an oval of black cloth with the Sigrunen embroidered in silver-grey thread. The black field cap sans totenkopf and distinctive pocket badge can be seen on this contemporary photograph of an Helferinnen. See also Gordon Williamson's World War II German Womens Auxiliary Services (2003: Osprey Publishing; pp. 40-41.) The image is not accurate and thus serves absolutely no purpose; its continued use can only be for titillation, not education. BlackberrySorbet 14:47, 7 October 2013 (UTC)

Women workers[edit]

the article seems to give the impression that women were less well utilized than in other combatant countries. This source seems to suggest it was just the impression the Nazis wanted to portray.

Albert Speer may have wanted to use more women and ‘Inside the Third Reich’ gives the impression that the Armaments Minister was in despair that he had to use more and more slave labour when he wanted to use German women who he believed would be more loyal to the cause. But in industry the number of women at work in Nazi Germany during the war never fell below 3.5 million. Likewise, agriculture needed a large female input and the figure for women workers here never fell below 5.5 million. During World War Two itself, the total figure for women at work in Nazi Germany never fell below 14 million – despite the impression the regime wanted to portray.--94.195.182.208 (talk) 08:59, 5 September 2014 (UTC)