Talk:Year 2000 problem

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Time (Rated B-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Time, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Time on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Computing / CompSci (Rated B-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Computing, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of computers, computing, and information technology on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Computer science.
 

Cost listed in $ and... adjusted $..?[edit]

Do we really need to compare the cost at the time to the cost in today's money? Since the value of the $ fluctuates pretty much daily in the global market, who will be updating the page that often? MrZoolook (talk) 03:58, 3 January 2013 (UTC)

It's done using a template, {{Inflation}}, so we don't have to update anything. --Walter Görlitz (talk) 04:10, 3 January 2013 (UTC)

Y2K and Global Warming - cultural legacy[edit]

The current article takes a very narrow view of the aftermath of the Y2K problem. It looks at Y2K from the perspective of those who defend and those who criticize the cost of remedial work. A more enduring legacy of the Y2K problem is the current status of Y2K in popular culture. A search which links "Y2K" and "Global Warming" registers over 5 million hits. Given the critical nature of the linkage, it would appear that a more enduring legacy of the Y2K problem is a distrust of the scientific community. In popular culture, the "Y2K bug" has become the archetypal scientific-technological scam, in which a self-serving group of experts promote a moral panic in order to attract funding to their organizations. This linkage is illustrated in articles such "It’s Always the End of the World as We Know It", by Prof Dutton, writing in the New York Times < http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/01/opinion/01dutton.html >. Dutton argues that the Y2K problem serves a model for the analysis of other crises predicted by scientific experts, such as global warming. According to Dutton, the "increasing shrillness" of warnings about "impending catastrophe" were the product of three factors combining to create an apocalyptic culture of crisis. This crisis culture arose from a convergence of commercial interests seeking to milk the public purse, academics seeking a cause to boost their careers, and members of the public looking for an apocalyptic scenario to provide meaning for their life. Y2K has entered the popular lexicon as a metaphor for a new form of an age old phenomena - vested interests combining to promote a moral panic. Perhaps a section could be added with a heading such as "Y2K - Cultural Legacy". Asd154 (talk) 05:48, 13 November 2013 (UTC)