Talk:Year 2000 problem

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The "Opposing View" section[edit]

The section with the arguments against Y2K being a serious problem is poor. It cites two areas where Y2K was not a problem, but offers no opinion on those areas where it undoubtedly would have been a big problem. The "absence of Y2K problems occurring before 1 January 2000" is a fatuous point. I was a Y2K test manager at a large insurance company. We were fully aware that our drop dead date was in the autumn of 1998, when renewal notices for annual contracts extending beyond 31st December 1999 would first be processed. Nearly all of the effort at that company was during 1997 and 1998. 1999 was for final fine tuning. Other, similar companies were doing the same thing.

The argument that problems should have been fixed when they occurred might have applied to organisations with small and simple applications. Large insurance companies, most of whose applications are date related, could not have coped with the avalanche of problems bringing complex systems down. To be kind I'll say that was an ill-informed opinion. I pored over these applications in minute detail and know how they would have failed. I don't have much respect for the opinion of people who tell me I needn't have bothered. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Freddie Threepwood (talkcontribs) 22:26, 11 January 2015

In particular I think the "hoax of the century" claim by the Wall Street Journal has undue prominence. It was written by a columnist, James Taranto, not a technology or business journalist. The link is broken and the article is no longer available online. Such extreme, hysterical claims should surely have a source available that we can go and check to see what evidence he has for his assertions. If it is merely Taranto's personal opinion then that is of no more significance than the views of the guy sitting next to me in the pub. Jean de Luz (talk) 17:05, 15 January 2015 (UTC)

No-one has objected to, or passed any comment, on my criticism of the "opposing view" section. I will therefore update it to qualify the unsubstantiated claims. There are no links available to back up remarkable claims (ie that there would have only a few minor mistakes, and the ludicrous assertion that "fix on failure" would have been generally "efficient and cost-effective"). I will also remove the reference to the Wall Street Journal article, which is ill-informed polemic from a controversialist rather than a commentator. Jean de Luz (talk) 17:50, 18 January 2015 (UTC)