Theatre503

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Theatre503
The Grace Theatre
The Latchmere Theatre
Wiki503.jpg
Theatre503 and Latchmere Pub, from Battersea Park Road
Address503 Battersea Park Road
London, SW11
United Kingdom
Coordinates51°28′29″N 0°09′15″W / 51.4746°N 0.1542°W / 51.4746; -0.1542Coordinates: 51°28′29″N 0°09′15″W / 51.4746°N 0.1542°W / 51.4746; -0.1542
Public transitNational Rail London Overground Clapham Junction
TypeFringe theatre
Capacity63 seats
Current useTheatre
ProductionNew writing
Opened1982; 37 years ago (1982)
Website
theatre503.com

Theatre503, formerly the Latchmere Theatre, is a theatre located at 503 Battersea Park Road in Battersea in the London Borough of Wandsworth, above the Latchmere pub. The venue is known for promoting the work of new writers.

History[edit]

The theatre was founded in 1982 as the Latchmere Theatre (the name taken from that of the pub downstairs), an offshoot of the Gate Theatre, Notting Hill Gate. It is a custom-built[clarification needed] studio theatre. The opening production was a new adaptation of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, which proved so successful that the production transferred to the West End.

In 2002 the theatre was rebranded as Theatre503 under Artistic Director Paul Higgins, and became a home for new writing. In 2006 Paul Robinson and Tim Roseman were appointed as Artistic Directors with the brief of developing the theatre's profile, and presented the European premiere of The Atheist.

Robinson was sole Artistic Director from 2012 to 2016. Under Robinson and Roseman, the venue saw the premiere of works by writers including Dennis Kelly, Phil Porter, Duncan Macmillan, Rachel Wagstaff, Alice Birch, Gabriel Bisset-Smith, Chris Urch, Jon Brittain and Phoebe Eclair-Powell. It won the Peter Brook Empty Space Award, was nominated for a Time Out Live Award in 2006, and won an Olivier Award in 2010 for its production of Katori Hall's The Mountaintop. In 2014 it was nominated for a second Peter Brook Empty Space Award, and won the Argus Angel for Artistic Excellence for its production Margaret Thatcher: Queen of Soho.

Andrew Shepherd became Executive Director at the beginning of 2016. In August of the same year, Lisa Spirling became Artistic Director, directing the winner of Theatre503's 2016 Playwriting Award, In Event of Moone Disaster (October 2017) by Andrew Thompson. Steve Harper is the theatre's Literary Manager.

In the 18 months following Spirling's appointment, 169 new writers had their work performed at the theatre, achieving 3 West End transfers, an Olivier Award and 2 national tours. In 2016, the theatre received 1629 scripts from 52 countries for their Playwriting Award, 423 submissions for their 503Five Writers' Development Scheme, 600 unsolicited scripts and 200 pieces for their Rapid Write Response scheme. The theatre aims to read and respond to every script that is submitted, and to provide opportunities for the local community, emerging theatre companies and new writers.[citation needed]

Awards and nominations[edit]

2018[edit]

Nominations –

  • Off West End, Best Supporting Male in a Play (Alexander Campbell for Br'er Cotton
  • Off West End, Best New Play (Tearrance Arvelle Chisholm for Br'er Cotton)
  • Off West End, Best Video Designer (Louise Rhodes-Brown for Br'er Cotton)

2017[edit]

Winner – Olivier Awards, Outstanding Achievement in an Affiliate Theatre Rotterdam by Jon Brittain (Premiered at Theatre503 in 2015 before transferring to Trafalgar Studios)

Nominations –

  • Off West End, Best Male in a Play (Graham O'Mara for Punts)
  • Off West End, Best Male in a Play (Christopher Adams for Punts)
  • Off West End, Best Male in a Play (Thomas Pickels for In Event of Moone Disaster)
  • Off West End, Best Director (Audrey Sheffield for The Dark Room)
  • Off West End, Most Promising New Playwright (Michael McClean for Years of Sunlight)
  • Off West End, Best Lighting Designer (Will Monks for The Dark Room)

2016[edit]

Winner – Off West End, Best Producer (DEM Productions at Theatre503)

2015[edit]

Nominations –

  • Off West End, Best New Play (Jon Brittain for Rotterdam)
  • Off West End, Best Set Designer (Ellan Parry for Rotterdam)
  • Off West End, Best Supporting Female (Jessica Clark for Rotterdam)

2014[edit]

Winner – Argus Angel for Artistic Excellence (Margaret Thatcher Queen of Soho)

Winner – Off West End, Best Set Designer (Signe Beckmann for A Handful of Stars)

Nominations –

  • Off West End, Best Director (Paul Robinson for A Handful of Stars)
  • Off West End, Best Sound Designer (Simon Slater for A Handful of Stars)
  • James Tait Black prize for Drama (Ailis Ni Riain's for Desolate Heaven)
  • Off West End, Best Set Designer (Petra Hjortsberg for Occupied)
  • Off West End, Best Supporting Female (Fiz Marcus for Occupied)
  • Peter Brook Empty Space Award

2013[edit]

Nominations – Off West End Awards:

  • Paul Robinson for Best Artistic Director
  • Best Production (Land of Our Fathers)
  • Most Promising new Playwright (Sam Potter for Mucky Kid)
  • Best Sound Designer (Simon Slater for The Life of Stuff)
  • Most Promising Playwright (Jon Brittain and Matt Tedford for Margaret Thatcher Queen of Soho)

2011[edit]

Winner – Off West End Awards:

  • Most Welcoming Theatre
  • Best New Musical (Porn – The Musical)
  • People's Choice Best Female Performance (Jessie Cave for Breed)
  • Nomination – Most Promising Playwright (Gabriel Bisset-Smith for The Charming Man)
  • Winner – Off West End Adopt A Playwright Competition – Sarah Grochala

2010[edit]

Winner – Olivier Awards, Best New Play, The Mountaintop by Katori Hall

Nominated –

  • Olivier Awards, Best Actress, Lorraine Burroughs for The Mountaintop
  • WhatsOnStage Awards – Best Actor, David Harewood for The Mountaintop
  • WhatsOnStage Awards – Best New Play, Katori Hall for The Mountaintop
  • Alfred Fagon Award – Rex Obano for Slaves

2009[edit]

Nominated – Evening Standard Awards, Most Promising Playwright, Katori Hall for The Mountaintop

Shortlisted – Evening Standard Awards – Best Actor, David Harewood for The Mountaintop

Nominated – TMA Awards, Best New Play, The Lifesavers by Fraser Grace (co-production with Mercury Theatre, Colchester)

Winner – Meyer Whitworth Award, Ali Taylor for Cotton Wool

2008[edit]

Nominated – Peter Brook Empty Space Award

Productions[edit]

Transfers[edit]

  • Rotterdam by Jon Brittain transferred to the West End and Brits Off Broadway in New York.
  • A Handful of Stars by Billy Roche transferred to the West End.
  • Land of Our Fathers by Chris Urch transferred to the West End before touring.
  • Freak went to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe.
  • Margaret Thatcher Queen of Soho by Jon Brittain and Matt Tedford transferred to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and the West End before touring.
  • The Mountaintop by Katori Hall transferred to the West End and Broadway.

Previous productions[edit]

  • 25 August 2015 – 29 August 2015 Frankenstein's Creature by James Swanton
  • 12 May 2015 – 6 June 2015 Sense of An Ending by Ken Urban
  • 5 May 2015 – 9 May 2015 EleXion by various authors
  • 8 April 2015 – 2 May 2015 Animals by Emma Adams
  • 10 March 2015 – 4 April 2015 WINK by Phoebe Eclair-Powell
  • 2 December 2014 – 10 January 2014 Cinderella and the Beanstalk, Rhapsody of Words, Theatre503 and Sleeping Trees
  • 10 November 2014 Society of Strange, Extempore Theatre
  • 4 November 2014 – 29 November 2014, Cans by Stuart Slade
  • 28 October 2014 – 1 November 2014 Red Like Embers: Contemporary Voices From Brazil
  • 3 September 2014 – 20 September 2014, Starlore for Beginners by Samantha Ellis
  • 21 August 2014 – 27 August 2014, Little Stitches by various authors
  • 1 July 2014 – 12 July 2014, A First World Problem by Milly Thomas
  • 24 June 2014 – 28 June 2014, Is It Getting Cold In Here...? by various authors
  • 17 June 2014 – 21 June 2014, It Never Ends by Julian Poidevin
  • 3 June 2014 – 14 June 2014, ObamAmerica by various authors
  • 27 May 2014 – 31 May 2014, Girl From Nowhere by Victoria Rigby
  • 30 April 2014 – 24 May 2014, A Handful Of Stars by Billy Roche
  • 25 February 2014 – 22 March 2014, Dog Days by Annie Hulley
  • 22 January 2014 – 15 February 2014, A World Elsewhere by Alan Franks
  • 14 January 2014 – 18 January 2014, Woman In The Dunes by Micha Columbo
  • 10 December 2013 – 4 January 2014, Margaret Thatcher Queen Of Soho by Jon Brittain and Matthew Tedford
  • 10 December 2013 – 11 January 2014, Boris And Sergey's Vaudevillian Christmas Adventure (company devised)
  • 5 October 2013 – 9 November 2013, Hotbed Festival Double Bill by Steve Waters
  • 20 August 2013 – 24 August 2013, Ernie by James Craze
  • 30 July 2013 – 3 August 2013, Gather Ye Rosebuds by Silva Semerciyan
  • 17 June 2013 – 6 July 2013, Our Share Of Tomorrow by Dan Sherer
  • 3 June 2013, Rapid Write Response: Playing With Grown-ups
  • 18 February 2013 – 22 February 2013, Double Bill: Still I See My Baby and Happiness by D. B. Horrigan and Danny Whitehead
  • 5 February – 2 March 2013, Desolate Heaven by Ailís Ní Ríain
  • 29 January – 2 February 2013, Freak/Staunch/Closure by Anna Jordan
  • 22–26 January 2013, Festopia by various
  • 8–19 January 2013, Steve And Then It Ended by Adam Usden
  • 9–10 December 2012, XY by various
  • 4 December – 5 January 2012, Cul-De-Sac by Matthew Osborn
  • 6 November – 1 December 2012, Where The Mangrove Grows by Joe Hammond
  • 9 October – 3 November 2012, Elegy by Douglas Rintoul
  • 2–6 October 2012, Shhhh... by 503Five
  • 4–29 September 2012, Life for Beginners by various
  • 12–13 July 2012, Billy Chickens is a Psychopath Superstar
  • 10–11 June 2012, XY by various
  • 5–30 June 2012, MEAT by Jimmy Osborne
  • 29 May – 2 June 2012, Mudlarks by Vickie Donoghue
  • 1–26 May 2012, Shiverman by James Sheldon
  • 23–28 April 2012, The Mole and the Worm by Lowri Jenkins
  • 17–21 April 2012, The Crossing by Esther O'Toole
  • 20 March – 14 April 2012, The Girl In The Yellow Dress by Craig Higginson
  • 26 February 2012, Blast Off
  • 7 February – 3 March 2012, Mathematics of the Heart by Kefi Chadwick
  • 10 January – 4 February 2012, Man in the Middle, a wikiplay by Ron Elisha
  • 3–7 January 2012, This Year It Will Be Different
  • 1–26 November 2011, The Swallowing Dark by Lizzie Nunnery[1]
  • 17–29 October 2011, Kalashnikov: In The Woods By The Lake by Fraser Grace
  • 27 September – 4 October 2011, Hacked by various
  • 30 August – 24 September 2011, Beasts (Las Brutas) by Juan Radrigan
  • 15–17 July 2011, Carrot by ben Ockrent
  • 17 May – 11 June 2011, Many Moons by Alice Birch
  • 19 April – 14 May 2011, SOLD by Suzie Miller
  • 27–28 March 2011, International Women's Month: PLAYlist
  • 23–16 March 2011, The Consultant by Neil Fleming
  • 15–19 March 2011, Ruffled by Ellen Gylen
  • 15 February – 12 March 2011, The Biting Point by Sharon Clark
  • 18 January – 5 February 2011, Bonnie And Clyde
  • 5 January – 8 February 2011, Pushing Up Poppies by Kieran Lynn
  • 7–12 December 2010, Phantasmagoaria by Gravel Theatre
  • 23 November – 5 December 2010, Coalition by various
  • 20 October – 13 November 2010, The Charming Man by Gabriel Bisset-Smith
  • 21 September – 16 October 2010, Breed by Lou Ramsden
  • 15 June – 10 July 2010, Wild Horses by Nimer Rashed
  • 11 May – 5 June 2010, Madagascar by J. T. Rogers
  • 7 April – 1 May 2010, Porn the Musical by Boris Cezek, Kris Spiteri, Malcolm Galea and Abigail Guan
  • 2–27 March 2010, Peter and Vandy by Jay DiPietro
  • 26 January – 20 February 2010, Slaves by Rex Obano
  • 27 October – 21 November 2009, This Much Is True by Paul Unwin and Sarah Beck
  • 9 June – 5 July 2009, The Mountaintop by Katori Hall
  • 12 May – 6 June 2009, Inches Apart
  • 1–26 April 2008, Cotton Wool by Ali Taylor
  • 6–31 May 2008, Natural Selection by Paul Rigel Jenkins
  • 20 February – 15 March 2008, Shadow Language by Kelly Stuart
  • 27 November – 15 December 2007, Crestfall by Mark O'Rowe
  • 30 October – 24 November 2007, Songs of Grace and Redemption by John Donnelly
  • 9–27 October 2007, The Final Shot by Ben Ellis

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Wil Johnson – (In A Better World – 2010)". mattjhorn.wordpress.com. Retrieved 26 February 2013.

External links[edit]