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Tomorrow's World
Produced by Raymond Spottiswoode
Edited by Ernest Borneman
Production
company
Distributed by Columbia Pictures of Canada
Release dates
  • 1943 (1943)
Running time
20 minutes
Country Canada
Language English

Tomorrow's World is a 20-minute 1943 Canadian docudrama film, made by the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) as part of the wartime Canada Carries On series.[1] The film, produced by Raymond Spottiswoode, described the importance of conservation and rationing during the Second World War, and how tomorrow's world will be more prosperous and better planned because of the war efforts. The French version of Tomorrow's World is Le Monde de demain.

A film emphasizing both the importance of conservation and rationing, and the increased industrial production, during the years of World War II. It suggests that "tomorrow's world" will be more prosperous and better planned because of the war efforts.

Synopsis[edit]

By 1943, shortages in food and resources began to affect all warring nations. In Nazi Germany, conditions began to harken back to the desperate years in the [[World War I}|First World War]] and shortly after, when ordinary citizens were impoverished and forced to severely curtail their food intake. In Russia, families had to contend with the widespread destruction of their homes. Great Britain survived by institution strict rationing of food and other strategic goods along with efforts to salvage metal in both domestic and industrial programs.

Even in affluent North America, the home front has been transformed by the exigencies of a "total war". While households may face the inevitable shortages, "tightening" the belt" has resulted in industrial production turned to manufacturing the weapons of war. The massive amount of goods that are produced may be a concern in the future, with leaders being aware that the Great Depression was caused by greed and poor planning. In order to avoid over production,


as Canadian men are being mobilized to serve in the military, three million women are also mobilized to serve in the "home front". For the second time in a generation, women again have shouldered the burden of maintaining the households and taking on roles that will allow men to fight. From playing a role in hospitals and medical research, industrial labour, hospitality, education and domesticity, the service these women provided to their country is significant.

On the home front, women can strengthen the war effort by strengthening the household, and, if they can, to enter the industrial workforce to supplement men in many positions at munitions factories. Women can take on specialized civilian roles such as driving heavy equipment or flight training at flying clubs.[Note 1] In the military, Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) women became clerks, drivers, photographers, air photo interpreters, weather observers, instrument mechanics, parachute riggers as well as many administrative and technical positions in the RCAF. Most women served at British Commonwealth Air Training Plan stations across Canada.[Note 2]

As the stress of "total war" becomes greater, it is imperative that women in important organizations such as the Red Cross can play a dominant role on the home front. From its headquarters in Toronto, the Red Cross is in touch with depots and workrooms across the country where women provide services that "lessen the suffering of others". Others such as the Women's Institutes and Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire also provide essential services, such as raising funds for weapons of war.

Women will also play a part after the war, in building a new world.

Synopsis[edit]

During the Second World War, food has become a weapon of war, validating Napoleon's adage that "An army moves on its stomach." In Allied nations such as the United States and Canada, vast reserves of farmland have to be harnessed to meet the needs of the war effort. While rationing is still in place in Canada for civilians, the food produced in the Prairies have been made available to the overseas military forces.

In other Allied nations, food scarcity is a daily misery. The United Kingdom faces a serious crisis when Nazi U-boats imposed blockades on the high seas. Even with its increase in farmland, only one half of its needs can be obtained through domestic food production, the rest must come from abroad. In the war-torn Soviet Union, Nazi conquest of the Ukraine's wheat fields have led to breadlines which have now become commonplace with the populace facing starvation unless more food can be obtained.

During the First World War, Germany was confronted by wide-scale shortages in food, leading to a breakdown in the will to fight. Hunger brought about Germany's collapse, and the vivid memories of the time of deprivation led to the rise of the Nazi Party led by Adolf Hitler.

During the inter-war years, Nazi Germany used a frugal "guns or butter" policy, with food producers ordered to assist the war aims of the Nazi government. New uses for food products included fat as a component for high explosives, apples to be turned into synthetic fuel and milk made into lubricating oil. German scientists created other synthetic items include a soy substitute for meat, with the purpose of making the nation self sufficient in food.

In Italy, self-sufficiency in food is also a goal for the Fascist regime led by Benito Mussolini who attempted to re-establish Italy's former glory. His efforts to reinvigorate the nation began with a campaign to increase its population, necessitating a tripling of food production.

The food shortage in Nazi-occupied countries is mainly the result of a strategic policy, the Hunger Plan (Der Hungerplan also Der Backe-Plan). The objective of the Nazi Hunger Plan was to inflict deliberate mass starvation on the Slavic civilian populations under German occupation by directing all food supplies to the German home population and the Wehrmacht on the Eastern Front.

Other conquered lands such as Greece and France also face drastic shortages of food. What is allowed, is doled out in grudging order by the Nazis, with the quislings and collaborators being fed first, while ordinary citizens wait their turn and Jews and the insane thrown scraps of what is left over. When the Allied forces are finally able to liberate the conquered peoples of Europe and Asia, providing an adequate supply of food will be one of the first priorities.

The wartime leaders of the Western world also have to face the challenge of feeding its own people, and during the postwar years, the inevitable need to feed hundreds of millions across the globe.

Production[edit]

Typical of the NFB's Second World War documentary short films in the Canada Carries On series, Tomorrow's World was made in cooperation with the Director of Public Information, Herbert Lash.[4] The film was created as a morale boosting propaganda film with another purpose, to show how officer training produced future leaders in the Canadian Army.[5]

Tomorrow's World', although using some compilation documentary techniques incorporating newsreel material in the initial scenes, was a docudrama that relied heavily on original footage shot at a military base in Canada, using officers-in-training who were the "actors". Director Julian Roffman was able to cast a number of trainees who would provide a realistic if "wooden" performance as officers.[6] The "stars" of Up from the Ranks were identified in a contemporary review of the film, that appeared in the September 3, 1943 issue of the Winnipeg Tribune: "Stars of 'Up From the Ranks' are mostly youthful commissioned officers who came to Canada as sergeants. There Is Lieut. Roily Ashman, a woodmlll worker near Ottawa; Lieut. Bill Connelly, who did a little radio singing in Ottawa and worked as a salesman; Lieut. John Taylor was a bank clerk; Lieut. Smith, a mechanic; Lieut. Paul Richard, a radio station manager in Quebec; Lieut. Marc Talbot was a foreman of a paper mill; Lieut. Harry Mar - sales, cafe proprietor from the United States, and Lieut. Bill Tichnor was a Ford mechanic. Roger Monast, the French lad in the film, was a stunt flier in 'Captains of the Clouds'. He was washed out of the R.C.A.F. after a crash." [7][Note 3] [Note 4][5]

Reception[edit]

Tomorrow's World was produced in 35 mm for the theatrical market, bit was also destined for showings to a military audience. Each film was shown over a six-month period as part of the shorts or newsreel segments in approximately 800 theatres across Canada. The NFB had an arrangement with Famous Players theatres to ensure that Canadians from coast-to-coast could see them, with further distribution by Columbia Pictures.[8]

After the six-month theatrical tour ended, individual films were made available on 16 mm to schools, libraries, churches and factories, extending the life of these films for another year or two. They were also made available to film libraries operated by university and provincial authorities. A total of 199 films were produced before the series was canceled in 1959.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ At the time, women pilots were not allowed to train military flyers.[2]
  2. ^ Their motto was: "We serve that men may fly."[3]
  3. ^ Roffman would go on to cast Pete Coventry as the lead actor in two other NFB short films, Battle Is Our Business (1943) and 13 Platoon (1943).[6]
  4. ^ Enemy footage was provided care of the Alien Property Custodian.[5]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Lerner 1997, p. 1051.
  2. ^ Barris 2005, pp. 302–303.
  3. ^ Ziegler 1973, p. 6.
  4. ^ "Recognize leadership of Winnipeg women."The Winnipeg Tribune, April 18, 1941. Retrieved: April 11, 2016.
  5. ^ a b c Morris, Peter. "Film Reference Library: Canada Carries On." Canadian Film Encyclopedia. Retrieved: April 11, 2016. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "CFE" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page).
  6. ^ a b Hayes, Geoffrey and Kirk W. Goodlet. "Exploring Masculinity in the Canadian Army Officer Corps, 1939-45." Journal of Canadian Studies/Revue d'Études canadiennes Issue 48, Volume 2, Spring 2014, pp. 40–69,256.
  7. ^ "New film shows officer training." Winnipeg Tribune, September 3, 1943. Retrieved: April 11, 2016.
  8. ^ Ellis and McLane 2005, p. 122.
  9. ^ Ohayon, Albert. "Propaganda cinema at the NFB". National Film Board of Canada, July 13, 2009. Retrieved: April 11, 2016.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Ellis, Jack C. and Betsy A. McLane. New History of Documentary Film. London: Continuum International Publishing Group, 2005. ISBN 0-8264-1750-7.
  • Lerner, Loren. Canadian Film and Video: A Bibliography and Guide to the Literature. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1997. ISBN 978-0-8020-2988-1.

External links[edit]



Varian's War
Directed by Lionel Chetwynd
Produced by
Written by Lionel Chetwynd
Starring
Music by Neil Smolar
Cinematography Daniel Jobin
Edited by Denis Papillon
Distributed by Alliance Atlantis Communications ,
Release dates
  • 21 April 2001 (2001-04-21)
(U.S.)
Running time
121 minutes
Country Canada
Language English

Varian's War" (aka 'Varian's War - The Forgotten Hero) is a 2001 Canadian film made-for-television drama. The film was directed by Lionel Chetwynd, based on the life and wartime exploits of Varian Fry who saved more than 2,000 Jewish artists from occupied France. The film stars William Hurt, leading an all-star Ensemble cast of Julia Ormond, Matt Craven, Maury Chaykin, Alan Arkin and Lynn Redgrave.

Plot[edit]

Whilst in Berlin during 1938 Varian Fry (William Hurt) saw first hand the mistreatment of Jews at the hands of the Nazis and was unsettled by what he saw. Back in America he finds a surprising amount of resistance and some anti-Semitism to his idea that they should try and assist artists stuck in Europe to escape but finds an ally in First lady Eleanor Roosevelt (Sheena Larkin) who intervenes when the State Department tries to block his plans to head to Europe to start tracking down names of notable artists, many Jews, and helping them escape. Varian goes to France with no real plan other than to find the people and work things out as he needed. He was sent help in the person of Miriam Davenport (Julia Ormond), and recruited others sympathetic to his mission, a Jew that he names "Beamish" (Matt Craven) and Freier, a counterfeit expert (Alan Arkin). They play a sort of cat and mouse game with the French and German police, they can not let them know their real purpose, and with really good counterfeit documents manage to get a group of Jews into Spain. Even when he arrives in Marseille he is shocked to discover opposition amongst some of those he wants to help but also finds some allies including Miriam Davenport (Julia Ormond - Legends of the Fall) and forger Freier (Alan Arkin).

It was set up by a train trip, then they hiked through the mountain forest to arrive at the checkpoint undetected. After that the movie ended, but the efforts were repeated successfully many times during 1940 and 1941, saving about 2000 all together. Many musicians, authors, painters, sculptors.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Producers of the film include Barwood's Barbra Streisand and Cis Corman and (Prince) Edward Wessex. filmed in Montreal, Principal photography - Shooting ended June 14th 2000, exteriors,, August, studio shots September 2000. Canada. Working title: Varian’s War: A Forgotten Hero.

The Canadian supporting cast includes Christopher Heyerdahl, Remy Girard, Gloria Carlin, Dorothee Berryman, as a brothel madame, Pascale Montpetit, Vlasta Vrana, Joel Miller, Maury Chaykin and Aubert Pallascio.

The exec producers are Barbra Streisand and Cis Corman of Barwood Films and Edward Wessex of the u.k.’s Ardent Productions. Hallmark Entertainment has world rights outside of Canada, the u.k. and u.s. pay. Canadian rights have been acquired by Alliance Atlantis Motion Picture Distribution.

John Vasey As the Vice President of Original Programming for Showtime, John supervised high-profile movies such as “Varian’s War” (starring William Hurt, Julia Ormand, and Lynn Redgrave)

[1]

Based in Montreal and in operation since 1966, Audio Cine Films Inc. has always been at the forefront of the non-theatrical film business. As one the largest and most experienced non-theatrical representatives in Canada, Audio Cine Films Inc. is best suited to deal with your film needs, whether for entertainment or educational purposes. Audio Cine Films is the exclusive Canadian non-theatrical rights representative for numerous major studios, producers and 1000’s of feature length movies. We are once again very proud to be the exclusive Canadian non-theatrical rights representative for the wonderful titles from Walt Disney Pictures, and invite all organizations to contact us at 1-800-289-8887 or by email at info@acf-film.com for additional information on our products and services.


The film has its roots in a discussion between Daybreak Pictures executive producer David Aukin and former Director General of the BBC Greg Dyke; when Dyke told Aukin that he wanted to make a documentary about the secret talks that ended apartheid, Aukin suggested turning it into a drama instead. Aukin had previously produced the acclaimed political drama The Government Inspector.[2]

Aukin and his production partner Hal Vogel contacted Paula Milne to write the script. She spent 18 months on the screenplay and researched the history of the talks by speaking to Thabo Mbeki and Michael Young in South Africa.[3] Pete Travis, director of Omagh (2004) and Vantage Point (2008), was sent the script by Milne. Travis was not interested in directing a historical drama about recent events and decided to turn the film into a political thriller.[4] William Hurt and Chiwetel Ejiofor were first to be cast.[5] Hurt, who played President Henry Ashton in Vantage Point, was cast as Will Esterhuyse because Travis wanted to cast actors he had worked with before.[6] Other actors were interested in the part even after Hurt had signed on.[4] Travis wanted to work with Ejiofor, who was his first choice for the part of Thabo Mbeki.[4]

Location scouting in South Africa was done in January 2008.[3] Rehearsals began on 14 April 2008 and scenes set in the UK were filmed for the rest of the month at a large country house near Reading, Berkshire. The production moved to Cape Town in May, where location filming was done for six weeks. Production wrapped in August.[2][3][7] Martin Phipps composed the film soundtrack.[8] The final cut of the film was completed on 24 December 2008.[3]

Reception[edit]

Target Entertainment sold the international theatrical distribution rights in 2008 at the Cannes Film Festival[7] and the American Film Market[4] for release in 2009.[2] Endgame had its world premiere on 18 January 2009 at the Sundance Film Festival, in the International Narrative Feature Films category.[9] The film was originally slated to be a major part of Channel 4's "Apartheid Season", and was previously scheduled for broadcast in mid-2008.[10] It premiered in the UK at the Human Rights Watch Film Festival in March and was broadcast on Channel 4 on 4 May.[3][11] It had its American television premiere on 25 October 2009 on Masterpiece Contemporary on PBS.[12] This was followed by a theatrical release on October 30 through Monterey Media in select U.S. cities.[13]

Reception[edit]

Overnight ratings indicated that Endgame's first Channel 4 broadcast was seen by 837,000 viewers (a 3.9% audience share). 64,000 more watched on Channel 4's one-hour timeshift service, Channel 4+1.[14] A repeat on the evening of 9 May got 336,000 viewers (1.7% share) on Channel 4 and 35,000 on Channel 4+1.[15]

The film's reception was positive. Review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes reports that 71% of professional critics gave the film a positive review, with a rating average of 6.5 out of 10.[16] The Daily Telegraph praised Lee Miller's performance but argued that "the elements never quite cohered". The newspaper concluded that the script "seemed too fuzzy in its focus, and also too eager to write history with an unambiguously broad brush."[17] Other publications praised the film. In contrast with the Telegraph, The Independent praised the script "Paula Milne's script skilfully interspersed talk with action".[18] The Times rated the film four out of five stars.[19] It also won a Peabody Award in 2009.[20]

"ON THE EVENING before the vote in the House on the most important part of his most important initiative -- the $ 1.6 trillion tax cut -- President Bush watched a movie. He invited leaders of Jewish organizations and Jewish members of Congress to join him in the 40-seat White House theater for a screening of Varian's War. The movie is about Varian Fry, an American who engineered the escape of Jewish artists and intellectuals from Vichy France in World War II. Bush sat with Lionel Chetwynd, the movie's director and one of Hollywood's few conservatives and Bush supporters."[21]

Chetwynd received a Writer’s Guild of America nomination for Outstanding Screenplay, with the film itself a Gold Jury Award winner at the Houston Film Festival. Ormond received a 2002 Golden Satellite Award for Best Supporting Action in the TV movieVarian's War (2001),

"VARIAN'S WAR: Cable movie at 8 p.m. Sunday on Showtime.

Sunday's Showtime movie "Varian's War" is based, however loosely, on the true story of Varian Fry, a wealthy American who went to Vichy, France, during World War II and rescued 2,000 artists, writers and intellectuals from Nazi persecution. One was the artist Marc Chagall.

For his efforts, Fry, who died in 1967, is scarcely remembered today as "the American Schindler."

William Hurt coughs up another curiously phlegmatic performance as Fry. Julia Ormand plays an American who helps him in Marseilles. Alan Arkin appears briefly as a forger who supplies the phony passports, andLynn Redgrave is Alma Werfel, the wife of novelist Franz Werfel.

Produced by Barbra Streisand, the movie offers a stock assortment of Nazi villains -- not that we're expecting Nazi heroes -- French collaborators and bureaucratic American foot-draggers.

There's some derring-do, but little palpable suspense. It's on a par with broadcast network movies and modestly entertaining, at best." Carman, John. Cite error: A <ref> tag is missing the closing </ref> (see the help page).

Voice of Action describes the importance of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) in the Second World War. The French version title of Voice of Action is Dynamisme des ondes.

Plot[edit]

From its earliest beginnings in 1901, with Guglielmo Marconi's experiments in long-distance radio transmission from Signal Hill in St John's, Newfoundland (now part of Canada), radio played an important role in conquering the vast distances of Canada.

During the 1930s, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation operated a nationwide radio network that provided local, national and international news and entertainment programs. The broadcasts served to connect rural and urban communities and helped to create unity for a widely scattered population. In northern and remote regions, radio was used to guide aircraft and to aid maritime navigation. Over 10,000 miles of landlines stretched across Canada, providing radio access for 93% of the populace. The familiar voices of CBC news readers and commentators such as Lorne Greene became part of the national psyche.

When war came, the CBC took an active role in providing the nation with timely information about the war effort. War correspondents such as Matthew Halton went directly to the battlefields, joining compatriots from Great Britain, the United States and Russia at the front lines. [Note 1]


On the home front, CBC broadcasters also sought to seek personal accounts from individuals directly involved in farm and industrial activities. Public forums ghost3d by experts in the field were also used to gain insight in issues that were of primary importance to the populace. CBC journalists also appeared on National Film Board of Canada trailers and short films that were shown nationally and for troops abroad.


Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Typical of many of the NFB's Second World War documentary short films in the Canada Carries On series, Voice of Action was created as a information film with a limited propaganda message.[22] The film was a compilation documentary that relied heavily on newsreel footage shot by the Canadian armed forces, and other Allied film units, but also included footage shot for the film.[22]

Stage actor Lorne Greene was featured in Voice of Action. Greene was known for his work on radio broadcasts as a news announcer at CBC, as well as narrating many of the Canada Carries On series.[23] His sonorous recitation and deep baritone voice, led to his nickname, "The Voice of Canada", and to some observers, the "voice-of-God".[24] When reading grim battle statistics or narrating a particularly serious topic, he was known as "The Voice of Doom".[25]

Reception[edit]

Voice of Action was produced in 35 mm for the theatrical market. Each film was shown over a six-month period as part of the shorts or newsreel segments in approximately 800 theatres across Canada. The NFB had an arrangement with Famous Players theatres to ensure that Canadians from coast-to-coast could see them, with further distribution by Columbia Pictures.[26] Bookings for the Canada Carries On films continued in Famous Players theatres and other cinemas throughout Canada. Some films were also sold to individual theatres periodically. Columbia Pictures continued to distribute the series, with France Films handling its French counterpart, En Avant Canada, in Quebec and New Brunswick.[27]

After the six-month theatrical tour ended, individual films were made available on 16 mm to schools, libraries, churches and factories, extending the life of these films for another year or two. They were also made available to film libraries operated by university and provincial authorities. A total of 199 films were produced before the series was canceled in 1959.[27]

In his book, Filming Politics: Communism and the Portrayal of the Working Class at the National Film Board of Canada, 1939-46., historian Malek Khouri analyzed the role of the NFB documentaries including Voice of Action. Khouri noted: "The use of media as an interactive discussion tool to deal with issues of social and economic development is also dealt with in a film about the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) ... The significance of the discussion trailers' impact on the political culture of the day is most clearly manifest in their encouragement of debates involving contentions that themselves had major political and ideological connotations. Firstly, these trailers pointed out the prospect of opening media outlets to political debates. In essence, they proposed that public space should also become a space for political action."[28]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Journalists from the Axis powers also recognized the power of radio and used the medium to effect.
  2. ^ While not appearing on screen, General McNaughton's voice is heard on a radio broadcast.

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ "William Hurt stars in Canada/ U.K. coproduction Varian’s War." Playback, June 26, 2000. Retrieved: March 24, 2016.
  2. ^ a b c Thorpe, Vanessa (17 August 2008). "How secret talks killed off apartheid". The Observer (Guardian News and Media): p. 23.
  3. ^ a b c d e Vogel, Hal (7 April 2009). "On Location: Endgame". Broadcastnow (Emap Media). Retrieved on 7 April 2009.
  4. ^ a b c d Kemp, Stuart (4 November 2008). "Q&A: Pete Travis". The Hollywood Reporter (Nielsen Business Media).
  5. ^ Douglas, Edward (10 April 2008). "EXCL: Ejiofor and Hurt Prep for Travis' Endgame". Comingsoon.net. Retrieved on 17 April 2008.
  6. ^ Cite error: The named reference Carnevale was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  7. ^ a b Kemp, Stuart (7 May 2008). "Pete Travis' 'Endgame' beginning". The Hollywood Reporter (Nielsen Business Media).
  8. ^ Carlsson, Mikael (3 December 2008). "Martin Phipps: Endgame". Upcoming Film Scores. Retrieved on 7 December 2008.
  9. ^ "Endgame". Sundance Film Festival 09. Retrieved on 30 December 2008.
  10. ^ Hemley, Matthew (26 March 2008). "C4 season to feature apartheid thriller Endgame". The Stage Online. Retrieved on 17 April 2008.
  11. ^ "Endgame - Benefit Gala (UK premiere)". Human Rights Watch. Retrieved on 22 March 2009.
  12. ^ "Official Program Site."
  13. ^ "Official Monterey Media film site."
  14. ^ Rogers, Jon (5 May 2009). "Ashes to Ashes scorches Compulsion". Broadcastnow (Emap Media). Retrieved on 5 May 2009.
  15. ^ Rogers, Jon (11 May 2009). "Britain's Got Talent storms Saturday night with 11.1m". Broadcastnow (Emap Media). Retrieved on 11 May 2009.
  16. ^ Endgame. Rotten Tomatoes. Flixter. Retrieved 5 July 2012.
  17. ^ TV review The Daily Telegraph. 7 May 2009
  18. ^ Endgame, Channel 4 Inspector George Gently, BBC1 The Independent. 10 May 2009
  19. ^ Endgame; Compulsion; The Wire The Times. 5 May 2009
  20. ^ 69th Annual Peabody Awards, May 2010.
  21. ^ Barnes, Fred. "Round One to Bush." The Weekly Standard, March 19, 2001. Retrieved: March 24, 2016.
  22. ^ a b Morris, Peter. "Film Reference Library: Canada Carries On." Canadian Film Encyclopedia. Retrieved: March 17, 2016.
  23. ^ Bennett 2004, p. 254.
  24. ^ Rist 2001, p. 84.
  25. ^ "Bonanza's Canadian Lorne Greene." Bite Size Canada. Retrieved: March 17, 2016.
  26. ^ Ellis and McLane 2005, p. 122.
  27. ^ a b Ohayon, Albert."“Canada Carries On” and the postwar years: the National Film Board in transition." National Film Board of Canada, May 14, 2014. Retrieved: March 17, 2016.
  28. ^ Khouri 2007, p. 157.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Bennett, Linda Greene. My Father's Voice: The Biography of Lorne Greene. Bloomington, Indiana: iUniverse, Inc., 2004. ISBN 978-0-595-33283-0.
  • Ellis, Jack C. and Betsy A. McLane. New History of Documentary Film. London: Continuum International Publishing Group, 2005. ISBN 0-8264-1750-7.
  • Khouri, Malek. Filming Politics: Communism and the Portrayal of the Working Class at the National Film Board of Canada, 1939-46. Calgary, Alberta, Canada: University of Calgary Press, 2007. ISBN 978-1-55238-199-1.
  • Lerner, Loren. Canadian Film and Video: A Bibliography and Guide to the Literature. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1997. ISBN 978-0-8020-2988-1.
  • Rist, Peter. Guide to the Cinema(s) of Canada. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001. ISBN 978-0-3132-9931-5.

External links[edit]

Warning: Default sort key "Voice of Action" overrides earlier default sort key "Up from the Ranks".

Trans-Canada Express
Directed by Stanley Hawes
Produced by Sydney Newman
Narrated by Lorne Greene
Music by Lucio Agostini
Production
company
Distributed by
Release dates
  • 1943 (1943)
Running time
19 minutes, 26 seconds
Country Canada
Language English

Trans-Canada Express is a 20-minute 1944 Canadian documentary film, made by the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) as part of the wartime Canada Carries On series. The film was produced by Sydney Newman and directed by Stanley Hawes.[1] Trans-Canada Express documents the importance of the railroad in Canada, emphasizing the use of the rail transport during the Second World War.[2] The film's French version title is D'un océan à l'autre.

Plot[edit]

In 1944,

A survey of the 25 000 miles of territory linked by Canada's railroads in tribute to the railroad's contribution to the war effort. Included is a sequence from Buster Keaton's The General, as well as a re-enactment of Lord Strathcona driving the final spike into the Canadian Pacific Railway Line.

Allied forces are being assembled for an assault on Axis-held Italy. This military expeditions marks the end of a troubled era for Italy during the 20th Century. Despite its origins as an early civilization and nearly 3,000 years of advances in arts and culture, Italians have faced an uncertain future.

During the turn-of-the-century, impoverished Italians left their homeland to settle in the United States and Canada. After the First World War, the rise of fascism led to the emergence of Benito Mussolini as the political and military dictator who led Italy into a series of foreign entanglements, in an attempt to reinvigorate the nation.

After invasion and conquest of Ethiopia, Mussolini committed to a campaign of aggression as part of Adolf Hitler's Axis nations. By 1943, Italian defeats in Africa and massive numbers of captured troops by Allied forces, have been characterized as the "African disease". Naval and aerial armadas massing for an attack on Italy, mean the end for Mussolini's deluded dreams of a new Italian empire.

Cast[edit]

[3]

Production[edit]

Trans-Canada Express was the part of the wartime Canada Carries On and The World in Action propaganda short film series, produced with financial backing from the Wartime Information Board for the Director of Public Information, Herbert Lash.[4][5]

Typical of the NFB's series of morale-boosting films, Trans-Canada Express used the format of a compilation documentary, relying heavily on newsreel material, including "enemy" footage, in order to provide the background to the dialogue.[Note 1]. [6]

The deep baritone voice of stage actor Lorne Greene was featured in the narration of Trans-Canada Express. Greene, known for his work on both radio broadcasts as a news announcer at CBC as well as narrating many of the Canada Carries On series.[7] His sonorous recitation led to his nickname, "The Voice of Canada", and to some observers, the "voice-of-God".[8] When reading grim battle statistics or narrating a particularly serious topic, he was known as "The Voice of Doom".[9]

Reception[edit]

In early 1942, NFB head John Grierson through his Hollywood contacts, found a new outlet for NFB documentaries, especially the recently launched war-themed The World in Action series. After the success of selling Warclouds in the Pacific, the NFB was able to make a further arrangement with United Artists for additional titles to be distributed in the United States.[10][11] With distribution in Canada and Great Britain, he now added the United States market.[12]


Trans-Canada Express was produced in 35 mm for the theatrical market. Each film in both the The World in Action and Canada Carries On series, Trans-Canada Express was shown over a six-month period as part of the shorts or newsreel segments in approximately 800 theatres across Canada. The NFB had an arrangement with Famous Players theatres to ensure that Canadians from coast-to-coast could see them, with further distribution by Columbia Pictures.[10]

After the six-month theatrical tour ended, individual films were made available on 16 mm to schools, libraries, churches and factories, extending the life of these films for another year or two. They were also made available to film libraries operated by university and provincial authorities. A total of 199 films were produced before the series was canceled in 1959.[13]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Enemy footage was provided care of the Alien Property Custodian.[6]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Lerner 1987, p. 75.
  2. ^ Khouri 2007, pp. 132–133.
  3. ^ Morris, Peter. "Re-thinking Grierson: The Ideology of John Grierson". in O'Regan, Tomas and Brian Shoesmith, eds. History on/and/in Film. Perth, Australia: History & Film Association of Australia, 1987, pp. 20–30.
  4. ^ "Recognize leadership of Winnipeg women."The Winnipeg Tribune, April 18, 1941. Retrieved: March 14, 2016.
  5. ^ Aitken 2013, p. 880.
  6. ^ a b Morris, Peter. "Film Reference Library: Canada Carries On." Canadian Film Encyclopedia. Retrieved: March 14, 2016.
  7. ^ Bennett 2004, p. 254.
  8. ^ Rist 2001, p. 84.
  9. ^ "Bonanza's Canadian Lorne Greene." Bite Size Canada. Retrieved: March 12, 2016.
  10. ^ a b Ellis and McLane 2005, p. 122. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "Ellis" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page).
  11. ^ Cox, Kierwan. "The Grierson Files." Cinema Canada Number 56, June/July 1979. Retrieved: March 14, 2016.
  12. ^ Ohayon, Albert. "Propaganda Cinema at the NFB – The World in Action." National Film Board of Canada, September 30, 2009. Retrieved: March 14, 2016.
  13. ^ Ohayon, Albert. "Propaganda cinema at the NFB". National Film Board of Canada, July 13, 2009. Retrieved: March 14, 2016.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Aitken, Iann. The Concise Routledge Encyclopedia of the Documentary Film. London: Routedge, 2013. ISBN 978-0-4155-9642-8.
  • Bennett, Linda Greene. My Father's Voice: The Biography of Lorne Greene. Bloomington, Indiana: iUniverse, Inc., 2004. ISBN 978-0-595-33283-0.
  • Ellis, Jack C. and Betsy A. McLane. New History of Documentary Film. London: Continuum International Publishing Group, 2005. ISBN 0-8264-1750-7.
  • Jackson, Paul. One of the Boys: Homosexuality in the Military During World War II. Montreal: McGill University Press, 2010. ISBN 978-0-7735-3714-9.
  • Khouri, Malek. Filming Politics: Communism and the Portrayal of the Working Class at the National Film Board of Canada, 1939-46. Calgary, Alberta, Canada: University of Calgary Press, 2007. ISBN 978-1-55238-199-1.
  • Lerner, Loren. Canadian Film and Video: A Bibliography and Guide to the Literature. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1997. ISBN 978-0-8020-2988-1.
  • Rist, Peter. Guide to the Cinema(s) of Canada. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001. ISBN 978-0-3132-9931-5.

External links[edit]

Warning: Default sort key "Trans-Canada Express" overrides earlier default sort key "Voice of Action".

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

Citations[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Barrier, Michael. Hollywood Cartoons: American Animation in its Golden Age. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003. ISBN 978-0-1951-6729-0.
  • Cheu, Johnson. (Ed.). Diversity in Disney Films: Critical Essays on Race, Ethnicity, Gender, Sexuality and Disability. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, 2013. ISBN 978-0-7864-4601-8.
  • Gabler, Neal. Walt Disney: The Triumph of the American Imagination. New York: Vintage, 2007. ISBN 978-0-6797-5747-4.
  • Maltin, Leonard. The Disney Films (4th Edition). New York: JessieFilms Ltd., 2000. ISBN 978-0-7868-8527-5.
  • Shull, Michael S. and David E. Wilt. Doing Their Bit: Wartime American Animated Short Films, 1939-1945 (2nd ed.) Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Incorporated Publishers, 2004. ISBN 978-0-7864-1555-7.
  • Telotte, J. P. Animating Space: From Mickey to WALL-E. United States: The University Press of Kentucky, 2010. ISBN 978-0-8131-2586-2.
  • Van Riper, Bowdoin A. Learning from Mickey, Donald and Walt: Essays on Disney’s Edutainment films. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, 2011. ISBN 978-0-7864-5957-5.

External links[edit]

Warning: Default sort key "All Together" overrides earlier default sort key "Trans-Canada Express".

Heroes of the Atlantic
Directed by J.D. Davidson
Produced by Stanley Hawes
Written by
Narrated by Lorne Greene
Music by Lucio Agostini
Cinematography J.D. Davidson
Production
company
Distributed by Columbia Pictures of Canada
Release dates
  • 1941 (1941)
Running time
15 minutes
Country Canada
Language English

Heroes of the Atlantic is a 1941 15-minute Canadian short documentary film, part of the Canada Carries On series of wartime films by the National Film Board of Canada (NFB), produced for the Office of Public Information.[1]The film documented the work of the Royal Canadian Navy and the Merchant Marine during the Battle of the Atlantic in the Second World War. Heroes of the Atlantic was directed by J.D. Davidson and produced by Stanley Hawes.[2]

Plot[edit]

A revelation in human terms of the work of the Merchant Navy and the Royal Canadian Navy in the crucial battle of the Atlantic. In port, while their ships are reloaded, sailors of every nationality throng entertainment centres. Ashore, civilians labour to produce munitions and foodstuffs, or learn in training schools to take their place in the Atlantic front line. When once more the ships are ready, minesweepers clear the channel, planes of the air patrol keep watch for distant danger, and another convoy steams out to sea. The seamen of the merchant navy that carried goods and armaments across the Atlantic during the Second World War were the unsung "heroes of the Atlantic" of the title. Many lost their lives to submarine attacks. This excerpt combines two messages: the caution of a nation at war and the welcome to merchant seamen. The work of the Merchant Navy and the Royal Canadian Navy in the battle of the Atlantic. Minesweepers clear the shipping channels, planes keep watch, and convoys steam out to sea.


In 1940, the Atlantic Ocean has become a strategic "highway" from the New World to Great Britain. The numerous ships that ply the Atlantic sea lanes during the Second World War head for nameless English ports where they unload their precious cargo of troops, munitions and supplies. Canadian seamen play a vital role in the lifeline for England.

From Canadian factories to docks, the endless supply of war materiel is carried aboard freighters that are marshalled into convoys protected by Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) destroyers. Royal Canadian Air Force Supermarine Stranraer seaplanes provide the first aerial protection but once the convoy is out to sea, the RCN destroyers are in charge.

The unseen enemy that the convoys face are the U-boats that wait for any stragglers from the convoy. When an alarm is sounded that enemy U-boats are thought to be nearby, the destroyers launch high-explosive depth charges and charge ahead at full speed, reaching 37 knots, turning back the threat. Once the convoy reaches its destination in England, the Canadian destroyers quickly turn around and head back to their home ports to escort a new convoy, heading for England.

Production[edit]

Atlantic Patrol was part of the Canada Carries On series, produced with financial backing from the Wartime Information Board.[1] The documentary was created as a morale boosting propaganda film during the Second World War. [3] cinematographer J.D. Davidson with assistant Donald Fraserand sound technicians W.H. Lane and C.J. Quick

The narrator of Atlantic Patrol was Lorne Greene, known for his work on both radio broadcasts as a news announcer at CBC as well as narrating many of the Canada Carries On series.[4] His sonorous recitation led to his nickname, "The Voice of Canada", and to some observers, the "voice-of-God".[5] When reading grim battle statistics or as in Atlantic Patrol, narrating a particularly serious topic such as Canadian seaman at war, he was "The Voice of Doom".[6]

Reception[edit]

The first of the Canada Carries On series, Atlantic Patrol was produced in 35 mm for the theatrical market and was the first short documentary shown in theatres.[7] Each film was shown over a six-month period as part of the shorts or newsreel segments in approximately 800 theatres across Canada. Along with others in the Canada Carries On series, Atlantic Patrol received widespread circulation.[8]

The NFB had an arrangement with Famous Players theatres to ensure that Canadians from coast-to-coast could see the documentary series, with further distribution by Columbia Pictures.[9] After the six-month theatrical tour ended, individual films were made available on 16 mm to schools, libraries, churches and factories, extending the life of these films for another year or two. They were also made available to film libraries operated by university and provincial authorities.[1]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Still known at the time as the Canadian Government Motion Picture Bureau.

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Ohayon, Albert. "Propaganda cinema at the NFB." National Film Board of Canada (NFB.ca), July 13, 2009. Retrieved: March 6, 2016.
  2. ^ Lerner 1997, p. 1570.
  3. ^ Morris, Peter. "Film Reference Library: Canada Carries On." Canadian Film Encyclopedia. Retrieved: January 24, 2016.
  4. ^ Bennett 2004, p. 254.
  5. ^ Rist 2001, p. 84.
  6. ^ "Bonanza's Canadian Lorne Greene." Bite Size Canada. Retrieved: January 25, 2016.
  7. ^ "The 1940s." NFB.com. Retrieved: January 25, 2016.
  8. ^ Rist 2001, p. 124.
  9. ^ Ellis and McLane 2005, p. 122.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Bennett, Linda Greene. My Father's Voice: The Biography of Lorne Greene. Bloomington, Indiana: iUniverse, Inc., 2004. ISBN 978-0-595-33283-0.
  • Ellis, Jack C. and Betsy A. McLane. "Theatrical Series". New History of Documentary Film. London: Continuum International Publishing Group, 2005. ISBN 978-1-4411-2457-9.
  • Lerner, Loren. Canadian Film and Video: A Bibliography and Guide to the Literature. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: University of Toronto Press, 1997. ISBN 978-0-8020-2988-1.
  • Rist, Peter. Guide to the Cinema(s) of Canada. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001. ISBN 978-0-3132-9931-5.

External links[edit]


Break-through
Produced by James Beveridge
Narrated by Lorne Greene
Production
company
Distributed by Columbia Pictures of Canada
Release dates
  • 1944 (1944)
Running time
11 minutes
Country Canada
Language English

Break-through is a 11-minute 1944 Canadian documentary film, made by the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) as part of the wartime Canada Carries On series. [1] The film documents the attack on Fortress Europe during the Second World War and the advance of Allied forces to the borders of Nazi Germany. Break-through was produced by James Beveridge. The film's French version title is L'assaut.

Plot[edit]

On June 6, 1944, supported by an immense naval armada, Allied troops, including a Canadian army, launch an amphibious invasion of Normandy, France. Facing a fierce resistance by Nazi forces, the Allied armies establish a beachhead on the Normandy coast. Normandy coast. Seeking redemption after their earlier rout at the Dieppe raid in 1942, the First Canadian Army is able to gain control of Juno Beach. Before regrouping for an advance into France, Allied troops are replenished by transport of war materiél and reinforcements. The Canadian contingent is tasked with an attack on Caen, France, forcing the enemy back from a city, already devastated by shelling and bombing.

In the Normandy countryside, a relentless Allied bombing campaign, along with marauding fighter bombers, begins to push the Nazi defenders back. Fleets of Supermarine Spitfires and Hawker Typhoons likewise sweep the skies in front of them. The extremely close cooperation between the Canadian infantry and armour with the pin-point aerial attacks

Wearing down bitter German resistance,

their earlier rout in 1942, in a raid on Dieppe, the Canadian troops successfully landed at Juno Beach, festablishing a beachheadare replenished by transport of equipment, munitions and reinforcements. [Note 1]

Once the beachheads were firmly secured the Allied troops including the Canadian contingent push eastward through France. Fighting through the streets of Caen, and on into the hedgerows and drive eastward to the gates of Germany. Opening scenes are of the D-Day landings and establishment of Canadian forces on the beachhead. Pictures of bitter street fighting and of pin-point bombing tell the story of Caen's capture and the advance towards Falaise. Made from footage filmed by units of the Canadian Army Overseas.

In 1943, Alaska and Canada's north has become of strategic importance when Japanese forces invade and occupy the Aleutian Islands. Both Canadian and American forces are deployed to protect and defend the region in the Aleutian Islands Campaign. The major obstacles to overcome for troops and war materiél to reach Alaska are the daunting distances and harsh environment.

For more than a century, fur traders, prospectors and indigenous peoples had populated the region but the Klondike Gold Rush and later Nome Gold Rush in Nome, Alaska had brought a stampede of newcomers who started new settlements but left when the gold ran out. In 1942, when war came to the region, a new boom transformed the abandoned settlements as workers were needed to build an overland route to Alaska.

U.S. Army engineers along with Canadian workers created the Alaska Highway or ALCAN Highway, carved out of the northern bush and forest to bring American troops and supplies northward. Canada's role was to construct airfields alongside the military highway and send ship convoys to supply the various outposts of the northwest, while Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) patrol bombers and lookouts keep a constant vigil.

The Northwest Staging Route built by Canadians was a series of airstrips, airport and radio ranging stations in Alberta, British Columbia and the Yukon. The "skyway" not only supplied the ongoing construction of the Alaska Highway but also served to ferry American lend-lease aircraft for the Soviet Union Air Forces from the United States to Alaska, and then across the Bering Strait to Siberia.

American and Canadian ground and air attacks drove the Japanese out of the Aleutian Islands. The joint military efforts resulted in the Japanese defeat on American soil, changing the Pacific War from a defensive struggle to an offensive against the heart of the Japanese empire.

At the threshold of a new age, Canada's north holds great promise, with farmland, forests, mineral deposits and the discovery of oil fields. The frontier can be exploited by air and the new airfields created for military use also can be the means to connect Canada via polar air routes to the rest of the world.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Typical of the NFB's Second World War documentary short films in the Canada Carries On series, Voice of Action was created as a morale boosting propaganda film.[2] The film relied heavily on combat footage shot by the Canadian armed forces, and the film units of the U.S. Army Signal Corps and the British Army. but also included footage shot for the film. Producer and director James Beveridge had previously used footage of the building of the Alaska Highway in his NFB documentary Pincers on Japan (1941).[3]

The deep baritone voice of stage actor Lorne Greene was featured in the narration of Look to the North. Greene, known for his work on both radio broadcasts as a news announcer at CBC as well as narrating many of the Canada Carries On series.[4] His sonorous recitation led to his nickname, "The Voice of Canada", and to some observers, the "voice-of-God".[5] When reading grim battle statistics or narrating a particularly serious topic, he was known as "The Voice of Doom".[6]

Reception[edit]

Break-through was produced in 35 mm for the theatrical market. Each film was shown over a six-month period as part of the shorts or newsreel segments in approximately 800 theatres across Canada. The NFB had an arrangement with Famous Players theatres to ensure that Canadians from coast-to-coast could see them, with further distribution by Columbia Pictures.[7]

After the six-month theatrical tour ended, individual films were made available on 16 mm to schools, libraries, churches and factories, extending the life of these films for another year or two. They were also made available to film libraries operated by university and provincial authorities. A total of 199 films were produced before the series was canceled in 1959.[8]

Film historian Jack C. Ellis, in John Grierson: Life, Contributions, Influence, considered films like Look to the North as NFB head, John Grierson making a political statement about Canada's gaining a "... sense of national identity and pride that had never existed before." The film also was visionary and a "... look to the future."[9]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Lerner 1997, p. 1051.
  2. ^ Morris, Peter. "Film Reference Library: Canada Carries On." Canadian Film Encyclopedia. Retrieved: January 31, 2016.
  3. ^ Leach and Sloniowski 2003, p. 118.
  4. ^ Bennett 2004, p. 254.
  5. ^ Rist 2001, p. 84.
  6. ^ "Bonanza's Canadian Lorne Greene." Bite Size Canada. Retrieved: January 31, 2016.
  7. ^ Ellis and McLane 2005, p. 122.
  8. ^ Ohayon, Albert. "Propaganda cinema at the NFB". National Film Board of Canada, July 13, 2009. Retrieved: January 30, 2016.
  9. ^ Ellis 2000, p. 208.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Bennett, Linda Greene. My Father's Voice: The Biography of Lorne Greene. Bloomington, Indiana: iUniverse, Inc., 2004. ISBN 978-0-595-33283-0.
  • Ellis, Jack C. John Grierson: Life, Contributions, Influence. Carbondale, Illinois: Southern Illinois University Press, 2000. ISBN 978-0-8093-2242-8.
  • Ellis, Jack C. and Betsy A. McLane. New History of Documentary Film. London: Continuum International Publishing Group, 2005. ISBN 0-8264-1750-7.
  • Leach, Jim and Jeannette Sloniowski, eds. Candid Eyes: Essays on Canadian Documentaries. Toronto: University of Toronto, 2003. ISBN 978-1-4426-5869-1.
  • Lerner, Loren. Canadian Film and Video: A Bibliography and Guide to the Literature. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1997. ISBN 978-0-8020-2988-1.
  • Rist, Peter. Guide to the Cinema(s) of Canada. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001. ISBN 978-0-3132-9931-5.

External links[edit]


Cadet Holiday
Directed by
  • David Bairstow
  • Robert Humble
  • Douglas Wilkinson
Produced by
Written by David Bairstow
Narrated by John Drainie
Music by Robert Fleming
Cinematography
  • Robert Humble
  • Robert Capbell
Edited by {plainlist

| studio = National Film Board of Canada | distributor = Columbia Pictures of Canada

| released =

  • 1951 (1951)

[Note 2]

| runtime = 11 minutes | country = Canada | language = English | budget = | gross = }}

Cadet Holiday is a 11-minute 1951 Canadian documentary film, made by the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) as part of the postwar Canada Carries On series. [1] The film, directed by David Bairstow, Robert Humble and Douglas Wilkinson and produced by Sydney Newman and Michael Spencer. The film was an account of a Canadian Army Cadet in a summer camp. The film's French version title is Cadets en vacances.

Plot[edit]

In 1950, during the annual summer camp, After completion of their initial training at high school, a corps of army cadets is selected for more advanced instruction at Ipperwash, one of five similar camps in Canada.


Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Typical of the NFB's postwar documentary short films in the Canada Carries On series, Cadet Holiday was a compilation documentary that relied heavily on newsreel material.[2] Additional on location photography at Canadian aircraft factories came from cinematographer Jean-Marie Couture and sound technicians Don Wellington and Clarke Daprato.[3] [Note 3] Working with sound editing by Peter Jones and Clarke Daprato

Reception[edit]

Screaming JetsCadet Holiday was produced in 35 mm for the theatrical market.[5] The film was received as in the ".. best of 'March of Times' style."[6] The NFB had an arrangement with Famous Players theatres to ensure that Canadians from coast-to-coast could see them, with further distribution by Columbia Pictures.[7]

Individual films were also made available on 16 mm to schools, libraries, churches and factories, extending the life of these films for another year or two. They were also made available to film libraries operated by university and provincial authorities. A total of 199 films were produced before the series was canceled in 1959.[8]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The NFB production date indicates 1950.
  2. ^ The NFB production date indicates 1950.
  3. ^ Footage from Screaming Jets was re-used in The Golden Age as part of the NFB/CBC Salute to Flight in The World in Action series.[4]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Lerner 1997, p. 1051.
  2. ^ James 1977, p. 283.
  3. ^ Morris, Peter. "Film Reference Library: Canada Carries On." Canadian Film Encyclopedia. Retrieved: February 6, 2016.
  4. ^ Jarrell and Ball 1980, p. 160.
  5. ^ Evans 2001, p. 40.
  6. ^ "Current movie reviews." Ottawa Citizen, June 21, 1951. Retrieved: February 7, 2016.
  7. ^ Ellis and McLane 2005, p. 122.
  8. ^ Ohayon, Albert. "Propaganda cinema at the NFB". National Film Board of Canada, July 13, 2009. Retrieved: February 6, 2016.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Evsns, Gary. In the National Interest: A Chronicle of the National Film Board of Canada from 1949 to 1989. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2001. ISBN 978-0-8020-6833-0.
  • James, C. Rodney. Film As A National Art: NFB Of Canada And The Film Board Idea. New York: Arno Press, 1977. ISBN 978-0-4050-9891-8.
  • Jarrell, A. and Norman R. Ball. Science, Technology, and Canadian History: es Sciences, la Technologie Et L’histoire Et L’histoire. Waterloo, Ontario: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 1980. ISBN 0-88920-086-6.
  • Lerner, Loren. Canadian Film and Video: A Bibliography and Guide to the Literature. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1997. ISBN 978-0-8020-2988-1.

External links[edit]

Warning: Default sort key "Screaming Jets" overrides earlier default sort key "All Together".


Template:Infobox filmLetter from Aldershot

Letter from Aldershot is a nine-minute 1942 Canadian documentary film, made by the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) as part of the wartime Canada Carries On series. The film was produced by Stuart Legg and directed by John Taylor.[1] Letter from Aldershot describes the observations in 1940 of a soldier from the First Division of the Canadian Active Force, stationed at Aldershot Garrison, England.[2] The film's French version title was Une lettre d'Aldershot.

Plot[edit]

In December 1939, 16,000 soldiers of the First Division of the Canadian Active Service Force under command of General A.G.L. McNaughton, were deployed to Halifax, Nova Scotia to await embarkation on seven ocean liners. As the convoy of ships set out, the main British battle fleet, on alert because of the German Deutschland battleship lurking in the Atlantic, took over escort duties. As they reached the shores of England, enshrouded in fog, the anxious troops wondered how they would be received.

British officials, including the Secretary of State for Dominion Affairs Anthony Eden, greeted the Canadians while the large throngs of ordinary British citizens that made up the heartfelt and grateful crowd on the docks, shouted: "Good old Canada!" After disembarking, the troops and their equipment are transported to Aldershot Garrison, the home of the British Army.

Once settling into their new quarters, the Canadian troops begin a strenuous regimen of training that includes becoming proficient with new infantry tactics, weapons and equipment, such as the new Bren light machine gun and the dispatch riders' motorbikes. Special drills and exercises stressed the importance of using gas masks and protection against mustard gas attacks.

After finishing training, the entire contingent was paraded before a royal guest, King George VI. The Canadians then were able to seek out the sights and sounds of a London in "full warpaint". Meeting the locals was an exchange of old world and new world cultures, with the Canadians bringing their unique skills at hockey to England. The most important leisure time was devoted to corresponding back to their loved ones found in all parts of Canada. Just as cherished was the mail that came from home.

With the assistance of a British camera crew, a number of the soldiers were able to make personal "letters home" messages that will end up on cinema screens back in Canada. The first Canadian troops to reach English shores, in the tradition of their forebears, were ready to "do their part".

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Typical of the NFB's Canada Carries On series of morale-boosting propaganda short films, Letter from Aldershot was made in cooperation with the Director of Public Information, Herbert Lash.[3] Using the format of a newsreel, the film relied heavily on the work of The Realist Film Unit (RFU), based in London to chronicle the Canadian First Division in England. Working with sound editing by Peter Jones and Clark Daprato, the overseas material, along with film shot in Canada, was edited by Stuart Legg to provide a coherent story.[4]


The deep baritone voice of stage actor Lorne Greene was featured in the narration of Letter from Aldershot. Greene, known for his work on both radio broadcasts as a news announcer at CBC as well as narrating many of the Canada Carries On series.[5] His sonorous recitation led to his nickname, "The Voice of Canada", and to some observers, the "voice-of-God".[6] When reading grim battle statistics or narrating a particularly serious topic, he was known as "The Voice of Doom".[7]

Reception[edit]

As part of the Canada Carries On series, Letter from Aldershot was produced in 35 mm for the theatrical market. Each film was shown over a six-month period as part of the shorts or newsreel segments in approximately 800 theatres across Canada. The NFB had an arrangement with Famous Players theatres to ensure that Canadians from coast-to-coast could see them, with further distribution by Columbia Pictures.[8]

After the six-month theatrical tour ended, individual films were made available on 16 mm to schools, libraries, churches and factories, extending the life of these films for another year or two. They were also made available to film libraries operated by university and provincial authorities. A total of 199 films were produced before the series was canceled in 1959.[9]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Lerner 1987, p. 75.
  2. ^ Khouri 2007, pp. 132–133.
  3. ^ "Recognize leadership of Winnipeg women."The Winnipeg Tribune, April 18, 1941. Retrieved: March 3, 2016.
  4. ^ Morris, Peter. "Film Reference Library: Canada Carries On." Canadian Film Encyclopedia. Retrieved: March 3, 2016.
  5. ^ Bennett 2004, p. 254.
  6. ^ Rist 2001, p. 84.
  7. ^ "Bonanza's Canadian Lorne Greene." Bite Size Canada. Retrieved: March 3, 2016.
  8. ^ Ellis and McLane 2005, p. 122.
  9. ^ Ohayon, Albert. "Propaganda cinema at the NFB". National Film Board of Canada, July 13, 2009. Retrieved: March 3, 2016.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Bennett, Linda Greene. My Father's Voice: The Biography of Lorne Greene. Bloomington, Indiana: iUniverse, Inc., 2004. ISBN 978-0-595-33283-0.
  • Ellis, Jack C. and Betsy A. McLane. New History of Documentary Film. London: Continuum International Publishing Group, 2005. ISBN 0-8264-1750-7.
  • Khouri, Malek. Filming Politics: Communism and the Portrayal of the Working Class at the National Film Board of Canada, 1939-46. Calgary, Alberta, Canada: University of Calgary Press, 2007. ISBN 978-1-55238-199-1.
  • Lerner, Loren. Canadian Film and Video: A Bibliography and Guide to the Literature. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1997. ISBN 978-0-8020-2988-1.
  • Rist, Peter. Guide to the Cinema(s) of Canada. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001. ISBN 978-0-3132-9931-5.

External links[edit]