User talk:Qinj

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Welcome!

Hello, Qinj, and welcome to Wikipedia! Thank you for your contributions. I hope you like the place and decide to stay. Here are some pages that you might find helpful:

I hope you enjoy editing here and being a Wikipedian! Please sign your messages on discussion pages using four tildes (~~~~); this will automatically insert your username and the date. If you need help, check out Wikipedia:Questions, ask me on my talk page, or ask your question on this page and then place {{help me}} before the question. Again, welcome!

RB199 bypass ratio[edit]

Hi Qinj, that's an interesting comment on the varying bypass ratio. Do you have any more information on it? Citable references?

Don't worry about it being reverted - that's what happens when you post something "out of the ordinary". I'm guessing that you have some connection with Rolls or Bristol? So you probably know more about this than the average wiki editor. However we get a lot of trouble with vandalism, so there's a tendency to get a bit "trigger happy" sometimes, particularly when an edit changes a cited figure, even when that original cite was a gross simplification.

A little note - we discourage "editorial" comments on articles (including editor names) and instead prefer that stuff to go through the talk pages. If you're a new editor, my advice is to make more use of talk: Often things that aren't entirely obvious at first glance get reverted off the article, but if they're raised through talk: first, then they stick.

Anyway, welcome to editing. We have a fairly active group of editors on aircraft and engines and it's one of the better parts to be working on, so thanks for contributing. Andy Dingley (talk) 13:12, 1 January 2011 (UTC)

A turbojet has a zero bypass ratio (unless Concorde with its special nacelle), but a turbofan has a variable bypass duct airflow depending pretty much directly upon aerodynamic rotational speed : N upon root T. High inlet temperatures mean low N upon root T which directly means changed bypass ratio. All bypass engines do it, as N upon root T drops. Tornado's engine was not designed conventionally at SLSISA and the bypass ratio quoted was incorrect as a result, and should never have been quoted anyway, for security reasons.Qinj (talk) 08:19, 12 January 2011 (UTC)

Bristol Siddeley[edit]

The information that you added to the Bristol Siddeley article looks useful, but appears to be copied from some other document. If it is from your leaflet, and you own the copyright, then that is not a problem provided that you are agreeing to release the copyright. Perhaps you could merge your information with the previous content rather than just insert a block. Best wishes, Dbfirs 11:27, 10 January 2011 (UTC)

I've removed your signatures from the article, not because we don't appreciate your contributions, but because signatures go on talk pages, not in articles. The "history" maintains a record of your valuable contributions. Dbfirs 16:40, 11 January 2011 (UTC)

I have trouble following the instructions, and wish to record my inputs, so add them below and to ensure they are not corrupted by somebody else, for the Bristol Siddeley article........ I also signed my inputs with quad~ as I thought that was necessary!!? History first

BSEL Publication TJ102, 1960 (see Bibliography) INTRODUCTION says:

BRISTOL SIDDELEY ENGINES LIMITED was formed by a merger, effective from the 1st April, 1959, of Bristol Aero-Engines and Armstrong Siddeley Motors. These were the aero-engine manufacturing companies of the Bristol Aeroplane Company and the Hawker Siddeley Group. The share capital of Bristol Siddeley is held in equal proportions by these two parent organisations.

The Company is one of the largest of its kind in the world and offers a wider range of aero-engines than any other manufacturer. Its executive headquarters are at Mercury House, Knightsbridge, London, and its main factories are in the Bristol and Coventry areas, aero-engine activities being centred in Bristol and industrial activities in Coventry.

Aero-engines produced by the company include piston engines, turboprops, turbojets, ducted fan engines, ramjets and liquid propellant rocket engines. Outside the aeronautical field its products are gas turbines for marine and industrial use, diesel engines, marine gearboxes, ball anti-friction mechanisms, and gas bearing pumps and circulators.

The history of Bristol Siddeley goes back to the earliest days of the motor car and aircraft industries. The Siddeley Autocar Company was formed in 1902 and the Deasy Motor Car Manufacturing Company in 1906. In 1909 J. D. Siddeley joined the Deasy company as General Manager, and the Deasy car became known as the J. D. Siddeley (Type) Deasy. In 1912 the name of the company was changed to the Siddeley Deasy Motor Car Company.

The outbreak of war in 1914 brought a spate of orders for cars, ambulances, military vehicles of all sorts, and subcontract work, including the manufacture of aircraft and aero-engines to Royal Aircraft Factory designs. In 1917 the company produced their first aero-engine, the Puma, and before the end of the war this engine was being produced at the rate of more than 700 per month.

After the war the company returned to the manufacture of private cars with the introduction of the Siddeley Six. At the same time it continued to build aero-engines, concentrating on a range of air cooled radials, among which the Cheetah is probably the most famous of all.

In 1919 a merger was arranged with the Armstrong Whitworth Company and from this arose the Armstrong Whitworth Aircraft Company and Armstrong Siddeley Motors.

In 1929 Armstrong Siddeley introduced the Wilson pre-selector gearbox which was fitted to the company's own cars and supplied to several other leading manufacturers of cars and commercial vehicles.

When the 1939 war broke out the factory concentrated on the production of aero-engines. A large proportion of the allied training programme was carried through with Cheetah engines, of which more than 40,000 were built. Other wartime activities included the manufacture of tank gearboxes based on the pre-selector gearbox developed for the Armstrong Siddeley car, and of torpedo engines.

The first gas turbine aero-engine produced by the company was the ASX which had an axial compressor and was of the reverse flow type. This engine was developed as the Python turboprop, which was in fact the first turboprop in the world to go into production, and, in the Westland Wyvern, was the first to enter military service. It was succeeded by the Mamba and Double Mamba turboprops, and the Viper turbojet which was first introduced as an expendible engine for the Jindivik target drone and later developed into a most successful long-life engine for piloted aircraft.

Largest of the turbojets developed by Armstrong Siddeley is the Sapphire which powers the Handley Page Victor Mk 1 bomber and all marks of Gloster Javelin fighter, and was used in the Hawker Hunter Mk 2 and 5 fighters. More than 12,000 J65 Sapphires have been produced in America for five different production aircraft and many prototypes.

In 1946 the company turned its attention to liquid propellant rocket engines and produced two successful pioneer designs, the Snarler and Screamer, which utilised liquid oxygen as the oxidant. The Snarler was the first British rocket engine with pilot-controlled thrust to pass a Ministry of Supply flight clearance test. The current Gamma engine, which powers the very successful Black Knight research vehicle, uses high test peroxide as the oxidant.

In addition to these, Armstrong Siddeley also took up the manufacture of diesel engines, first of their own design and then of the Maybach type manufactured under licence, and of Beaver ball screw anti-friction mechanisms. As after the first World War, so in 1945 Armstrong Siddeley were the first to introduce a genuine post-war range of cars. These were followed in 1952 by the larger-engined and more luxurious Sapphire, which in turn was succeeded by the Star Sapphire saloon and limousine which are distinguished cars in the high powered luxury class.

The Bristol side of the family was founded as the British and Colonial Aeroplane Company in 1910 and by the end of the war in 1918 had produced three historic aircraft; the Boxkite, pioneer military biplane and trainer, the Scout, first of the single seat biplane fighters, with guns firing through the propeller disc and the Fighter, first of the two-seat biplane fighters. In 1919 the name of the company was changed to the Bristol Aeroplane Company and it acquired the rights in the Cosmos radial aero-engine as a basis for setting up an Aero-Engine Department.

The first Bristol engine, the Jupiter, was so successful that it was at one time being manufactured in sixteen different countries. It powered a great variety of aircraft, including Imperial Airways' Hercules airliners. Its reputation was well upheld by its supercharged successors the Mercury and Pegasus. The latter engine shared in no less than four successful attempts on the world's altitude record, in which the company developed a traditional interest. Since the war the record has been broken twice more by Olympus engines in an English Electric Canberra.

In 1932 the Aero-Engine Department produced the first of its famous sleeve valve radials, the Perseus. Four years later this was followed by the larger Hercules which was produced in enormous quantities during the war and which is still in production. It was followed by the still larger Centaurus. During the war over 14,000 Bristol aircraft and 100,000 engines were produced. For some years after the war the Hercules powered virtually all British civil and military transports.

The first Bristol gas turbine, the Theseus, was the first turboprop in the world to pass an official type test and went into regular service with Transport Command. It was succeeded by the more compact and powerful Proteus which is installed in the Britannia airliner. The Proteus is now successfully applied to marine propulsion, in which role it powers the fastest warships in the world - the Royal Navy's Fast Patrol Boats - and to electric power generation.

The Proteus was the first engine to embody the free-turbine principle, and the same divided turbine concept was applied to the Olympus, which became the first turbojet to employ the two-spool compressor layout. This engine powers all Avro Vulcan bombers and is in process of development for the British Aircraft Corporation TSR-2 aircraft. Advanced versions of the Olympus develop 33,000 lb thrust with reheat.

In contrast, the Orpheus is a lightweight, medium thrust single-spool turbojet which has become virtually the standard engine in its class. It has already flown in nine different types of aircraft. It is also being manufactured under licence in India, Italy, and Germany.

Ramjet engines have also been under development at Bristol for more than ten years and the Thor ramjet, which can produce some 130,000 hp at Mach 3, powers the Bristol/Ferranti Bloodhound surface-to-air guided missile.

In 1955 the Aero-Engine Division was reformed as Bristol Aero-Engines Limited, a subsidiary company of the Bristol Aeroplane Company.

In May, 1958, Bristol Siddeley Engines Limited was formed as a pilot company to bring about an alliance between the Bristol and Coventry concerns, and a full merger took effect from the beginning of April, 1959. The purpose of the new company was to combine the research, engineering and manufacturing resources of the two great component companies to meet the changing demands of the aviation industry. Fortunately the combination was made easier by the fact that the products of the two companies were to a remarkable extent complementary and together formed an ideal technical and sales pattern.

BSEL Publication TJ151, 1962 (see Bibliography) INTRODUCTION says :-

BRISTOL SIDDELEY ENGINES LIMITED was formed by a merger effective from the 1st April, 1959, of Bristol AeroEngines and Armstrong Siddeley Motors. These were the aero-engine manufacturing companies of the Bristol Aeroplane Company and the Hawker Siddeley Group. The share capital of Bristol Siddeley is held in equal proportions by these two parent organisations.

The Company is one of the largest of its kind in the world and offers a wider range of engines than any other manufacturer. Aero-engines produced by the company include piston engines, turboprops, turboshafts, turbojets, turbofans, auxiliary power units, ramjets and liquid propellant rocket engines. Outside the aeronautical field its products are gas turbines for marine and industrial use, diesel engines, and automatic transmissions.

The history of Bristol Siddeley goes back to the earliest days of the motor car and aircraft industries. The Siddeley Autocar Company was formed in 1902 and the Deasy Motor Car Manufacturing Company in 1906. In 1909 J. D. Siddeley joined the Deasy company as General Manager, and the Deasy car became known as the J. D. Siddeley (Type) Deasy. In 1912 the name of the company was changed to the Siddeley Deasy Motor Car Company.

The outbreak of war in 1914 brought a spate of orders for cars, ambulances, military vehicles of all sorts, and subcontract work, including the manufacture of aircraft and aero-engines to Royal Aircraft Factory designs. In 1917 the company produced their first aero-engine, the Puma, and before the end of the war this engine was being produced at the rate of more than 700 per month.

After the war the company returned to the manufacture of private cars with the introduction of the Siddeley Six. At the same time it continued to build aero-engines, concentrating on a range of air cooled radials, among which the Cheetah is probably the most famous.

In 1919 a merger was arranged with the Armstrong Whitworth Company and from this arose the Armstrong Whitworth Aircraft Company and Armstrong Siddeley Motors.

In 1929 Armstrong Siddeley introduced the Wilson pre-selector gearbox which was fitted to the company's own cars and supplied to several other leading manufacturers of cars and commercial vehicles.

When the 1939 war broke out the factory concentrated on the production of aero-engines. A large proportion of the allied training programme was carried through with Cheetah engines, of which more than 40,000 were built. Other wartime activities included the manufacture of tank gearboxes based on the pre-selector gearbox developed for the Armstrong Siddeley car, and of torpedo engines.

The first gas turbine aero-engine produced by the company was the ASX which had an axial compressor and was of the reverse flow type. This engine was developed as the Python turboprop, which was in fact the first turboprop in the world to go into production, and, in the Westland Wyvern, was the first to enter military service. It was succeeded by the Mamba and Double Mamba turboprops and the Viper turbojet, which was first introduced as an expendable engine for the Jindivik target drone and later developed into a most successful long-life engine for piloted aircraft.

Largest of the turbojets developed by Armstrong Siddeley was the Sapphire which powers the Handley Page Victor B Mk 1 bomber and all marks of Gloster Javelin fighter, and was used in the Hawker Hunter Mk 2 and 5 fighters. More than 12,000 J65 Sapphires have been produced in America for five different production aircraft and many prototypes.

In 1946 the company turned its attention to liquid propellant rocket engines and produced two successful pioneer designs, the Snarler and Screamer, which utilised liquid oxygen as the oxidant. The Snarler was the first British rocket engine with pilot-controlled thrust to pass a Ministry of Supply flight clearance test. The current Gamma and Stentor engines, which power the very successful Black Knight research vehicle and the Avro Blue Steel stand-off bomb respectively, both use high test peroxide as the oxidant.

In addition to these, Armstrong Siddeley also took up the manufacture of diesel engines, first of their own design and then of the Maybach type manufactured under licence. As after the first World War, so in 1945, Armstrong Siddeley were the first to introduce a genuine post-war range of cars. These were followed in 1952 by the larger-engined and more luxurious Sapphire, which in turn was succeeded by the Star Sapphire saloon and limousine which are distinguished cars in the high powered luxury class.

The Bristol side of the family was founded as the British and Colonial Aeroplane Company in 1910 and by the end of the war in 1918 had produced three historic aircraft - the Boxkite, pioneer military biplane and trainer, the Scout, first of the single seat biplane fighters, with guns firing through the propeller disc, and the Fighter, first of the two-seat biplane fighters. In 1919 the name of the company was changed to the Bristol Aeroplane Company and it acquired the rights in the Cosmos radial aero-engine as a basis for setting up an Aero-Engine Department.

The first Bristol engine, the Jupiter, was so successful that it was at one time being manufactured in sixteen different countries. It powered a great variety of aircraft, including Imperial Airways' Heracles airliners. Its reputation was well upheld by its supercharged successors, the Mercury and Pegasus. The latter engine shared in no less than four successful attempts on the world's altitude record, in which the company developed a traditional interest. Since the war the record has been broken twice more by Olympus engines in an English Electric Canberra.

In 1932 the Aero-Engine Department produced the first of its famous sleeve valve radials, the Perseus. Four years later this was followed by the larger Hercules which was produced in enormous quantities during the war and which is still in production. It was followed by the still larger Centaurus. During the war over 14,000 Bristol aircraft and 100,000 engines were produced. For some years after the war the Hercules powered virtually all British civil and military transports.

The first Bristol gas turbine, the Theseus, was the first turboprop in the world to pass an official type test and went into regular service with Transport Command. It was succeeded by the more compact and powerful Proteus which is installed in the Britannia airliner. The Proteus is now successfully applied to marine propulsion, in which role it powers the fastest warships in the world - the Royal Navy's Fast Patrol Boats - and to electric power generation.

The Proteus was the first engine to embody the free-turbine principle, and the same divided turbine concept was applied to the Olympus, which became the first turbojet to employ the two-spool compressor layout. This engine powers all Avro Vulcan bombers and is in process of development for the British Aircraft Corporation TSR-2 aircraft. Advanced versions of the Olympus develop 33,000 lb thrust with reheat.

In contrast, the Orpheus is a lightweight, medium thrust single-spool turbojet which has become virtually the standard engine in its class. It has already flown in ten different types of aircraft. It is also being manufactured under licence in India, Italy, and Germany.

Ramjet engines have also been under development at Bristol for more than ten years and the Thor ramjet, which can produce some 130,000 hp at Mach 3, powers the Bristol/Ferranti Bloodhound surface-to-air guided missile. (Note that Odin pre-concept thinking was secret at the time so was not mentioned in this introduction).

In 1955 the Aero-Engine Division was reformed as Bristol Aero-Engines Limited, a subsidiary company of the Bristol Aeroplane Company.

In May, 1958, Bristol Siddeley Engines Limited was formed as a pilot company to bring about an alliance between the Bristol and Coventry concerns, and a full merger took effect from the beginning of April, 1959. The purpose of the new company was to combine the research, engineering and manufacturing resources of the two great component companies to meet the changing demands of the aviation industry.

The Company was further strengthened in November 1961 when it acquired the full share capital of the de Havilland Engine Company Limited and Blackburn Engines Limited, both of which were formerly operating within the Hawker Siddeley Group. The aircraft side of Blackburn became part of Hawker Siddeley. See de Havilland Engine Company and Blackburn Engines.

Both of these companies have long histories in the aero-engine industry. The de Havilland Engine Company Limited was formed in 1944 from the Engine Division of the de Havilland Aircraft Company, which was itself founded in 1921. The Gipsy 1 engine, designed in 1927 by the late Major F B Halford, was the first of a long line of Gipsy's which soon established a world-wide reputation as one of the most reliable light aero engines.

In the 1920's de Havilland light aircraft powered by these early Gipsy engines first stimulated interest in private flying, and in the 1930's made possible the great solo flights by such pioneers as Jim Mollison and Amy Johnson. Six-cylinder Gipsy's powered the Comet Racer for its recordbreaking England-Australia flight in 1934. Gipsy Queen engines are still in production for the de Havilland Dove and Heron executive aircraft.

In 1941, the Company made an early entry into the field of jet propulsion and produced the Goblin engine, which was the first gas turbine to pass a full military Type Test, and subsequently the Ghost which was the first turbojet to be approved for civil operations. These engines were produced under licence in a number of countries and are still widely used in Vampire, Venom, SAAB J21R and J29 aircraft. The Ghost powered the Comet 1, the world's first jet airliner.

The de Havilland Sprite was the first rocket engine to obtain a military type test Certificate. Later rocket engines include the Super-Sprite and the Spectre variable thrust units. In 1954, the Company produced its first axial turbojet. This was the reheated Gyron of 30,000 lb thrust, from which is descended the Gyron Junior series currently in production. Versions of the latter power the Blackburn Buccaneer naval strike aircraft and the Bristol T 188 supersonic research aircraft.

The de Havilland Engine Company's latest products are the Gnome turboshaft and propeller turbine units of 1050-1250 SHP which have wide application in the VTOL/STOL field. The Gnome engine is particularly suitable for helicopters and large orders for it have been received.

The Blackburn Aeroplane and Motor Company entered the aero-engine field in 1934 when the Cirrus-Hermes Engineering Company became part of the Blackburn Group and moved to Brough. This unit later became the Engine Division of Blackburn Aircraft and subsequently Blackburn Engines Limited. In 1931, the Cirrus-Hermes Company had taken over Cirrus Aero-Engines, which in turn had been formed in 1927 by the Aircraft Disposal Company to make the Cirrus engine also designed by Frank Halford.

In 1952 an agreement was signed which enabled Blackburn Engines Limited to produce engines based on the Turbomeca range of small gas turbine engines. Two of these, the Palouste and Artouste, and subsequently the Cumulus, have been developed for use as airborne auxiliary power units for large aircraft. Another major application of the Palouste is as a ground starter unit and it is widely used in the British Services. Turboshaft developments of these engines are the Nimbus and the Turmo, both of which have important applications in the helicopter and air-cushion craft fields. The Nimbus powers the Westland Scout/Wasp helicopters and the SR-N2 Hovercraft, and the Turmo powers the Vickers Armstrongs VA-3 Hovercraft.

The blending of de Havilland Engines and Blackburn Engines with Bristol Siddeley has been made easier by the fact that the products of the three companies are to a remarkable extent complementary and together form an integrated technical and sales pattern covering engines from the smallest to the largest sizes.

Thus my saved text.Qinj (talk) 08:00, 12 January 2011 (UTC)

The extra info under BSEL Personnel is

BSEL Publication: TJ102 July 1960 Page 7 Board of Directors Sir Reginald Verdon Smith, LLD, MA, BCL (Chairman) Sir Roy Dobson, CBE, Hon FRAeS, JP (Vice-Chairman) H T Chapman, CBE, FRAeS, MIMechE (Deputy Chairman - Coventry) Sir Alec Coryton, KCB, KBE, MVO, DFC (Deputy Chairman - Bristol) Sir Arnold Hall, FRS, MA, Hon ACGI, FRAeS (Managing Director) B Davidson, BA (Business Director) G L Hack, MIMechE (Deputy Production Director) Dr S G Hooker, OBE, DPhil, BSc, DIC, ARCSc, FRAeS, MIMechE (Technical Director Aero) W H Lindsey, MA, FRAeS, MIMechE (Technical Director Power) W Masterton, CA J F Robertson, CA W F Saxton, MBE (Production Director) Special Directors J E Attwood, MIProdE F T Blakey, FCWA, AACCA J Innes, CBE R L Ninnes, FRAeS Dr E Warlow-Davies, DPhil, BA, BSc Secretary to the Board F Shutt, FCA BSLOGO BRISTOL SIDDELEY ENGINES LIMITED 7

S.G.Hooker Page 124 of "Not Much of an Engineer" (see Bibliography) says :-

...........He was Sir Reginald Verdon Smith, an absolutely masterful public speaker, and dedicated to the welfare of Bristol.

He was chairman of the board of Bristol Siddeley Engines Ltd, whose formation he had masterminded, and chairman-elect of Lloyds Bank, following in the steps of his father. Sir Arnold Hall was BSEL managing director, I was technical director and Brian Davidson commercial director. One day Brian brought to our attention the fact that the company was making excessive profits overhauling Sapphire turbojets for the RAF, under a contract we had inherited from Armstrong Siddeley. In those days it was the rule that the costs of early overhauls of a new type of engine were estimated normally on the high side. After sufficient experience had been gained, the actual costs were carefully examined by the Ministry and a price for subsequent overhauls mutually agreed, based on these real costs. But in the case of the Sapphire the Ministry and Armstrong Siddeley had failed to carry out the detailed review of actual costs, and so the original high-price contract was still running years after the engine had been in service.

This was most embarrassing news, especially as it was something BSEL had inherited and had known nothing about until Davidson did his own careful checks. Verdon ruled that the Ministry must be informed and that BSEL must repay several million pounds, an offer which was accepted by the Ministry. Since the latter and BSEL were equally to blame, no one anticipated that the Public Accounts Committee would create a supposed great scandal and criticize Verdon personally. He was the personification of rectitude in all his dealings, but Wedgwood Benn, who was the current Minister of Technology insisted that Verdon must resign from all his public affairs.

The splendid career of a great man, who had unstintingly given his great gifts for the welfare of others, particularly to the education of young people, was thus ignominiously curtailed in an atmosphere of spite and injustice.

Note that Wedgewood Benn was Minister of Technology from 4th July 1966 to 19th June 1967, and RR acquired BSEL on 5th October 1966. The Public Accounts Select Committee consists of a few MP who gather at intervals to discuss matters of interest to them as individuals, not as accounts experts.Qinj (talk) 08:03, 12 January 2011 (UTC)

And now Bibliography

  1. Bristol Siddeley Engines Limited : "This is Bristol Siddeley" Publication TJ102 July 1960
  2. Bristol Siddeley Engines Limited : "This is Bristol Siddeley" Publication TJ151 December 1962 17:54, 11 January 2011 (UTC)
  3. Hooker, S.G. "Not Much of an Engineer" page 124. The Crowood Press Ltd, 1991. ISBN 1853102857

Qinj (talk) 08:08, 12 January 2011 (UTC)

Note that HISTORY requires that both TJ102 and TJ151 be recorded accurately. The publications were available to all when published.Qinj (talk) 09:24, 12 January 2011 (UTC)

BSEL Publication TJ151, 1962 (see Bibliography) includes the following Bristol Siddeley Engines and their applications :-


TURBOFANS

Bristol Pegasus 2 shaft medium bypass ratio : Hawker P 1127 (Kestrel then Harrier) ;

BS143 2 shaft medium bypass ratio : Missions design evaluated for MRCA ;

BS 75 takeoff thrust 7350 lbf, sfc 0.508 lb/lbf/hr, 2030mm long : Short/Medium range airliners and military applications ;

BS 59 : V/STOL applications ;


TURBOJETS

Bristol Olympus : Avro Vulcan, British Aircraft Corporation TSR-2, Projected supersonic transports (now Concorde) ;

de Havilland Gyron Junior : Blackburn Buccaneer S1, Bristol Type 188 supersonic research aircraft ; Sapphire : Gloster Javelin, Handley Page Victor B Mk 1 ; Armstrong Siddeley Sapphire (J65 built in USA under licence) : Douglas A4D Skyhawk, Grumman F 11 F- 1 Tiger, Martin B-57 (Canberra), North American Fury, Republic RF-84F

Bristol Orpheus : Dassault BaIzac V, Fiat G91 and G91-Trainer, Folland Gnat and Gnat-Trainer, Fuji T1A, Hindustan HF24, Short SB-5 ;

de Havilland Ghost : de Havilland Venom and Sea Venom, SAAB J29 ;

de Havilland Goblin : de Havilland Vampire and Vampire Trainer ;

Armstrong Siddeley Viper : Bell X-14 V/STOL research aircraft, de Havilland DH 125, Handley Page HP 115, Hunting Jet Provost, Jindivik target drone, Macchi MB 326 (and MB339 later), Piaggio/Douglas Vespa Jet, Westland SR-N1 Hovercraft ;


TURBOPROPS

Bristol Proteus turboprop, 3915 shp + 1260 lbf thrust, sfc 0.593 lb/TEHP/hr, 2555mm long, 1019mm dia, 1344 kg wt : Bristol Britannia ;

Armstrong Siddeley Double Mamba turboprop, 3600 shp + 730 lbf thrust, SFC 0.66 lb/TEHP/hr, 2625mm long, 1300mm high, 1134 kg dry wt : Fairey Gannet ;

de Havilland Gnome : Feeder-line and executive aircraft ;

Armstrong Siddeley Python 1945 turboprop, 4110 ehp : Westland Wyvern ; Theseus 1947 free turbine turboprop, 2200 ehp : Avro Lincoln. Handley Page Hermes ;

Armstrong Siddeley Mamba 1948 turboprop, 1300-2075 ehp : Armstrong Whitworth Apollo. Avro Athena. Boulton Paul Balliol ;Qinj (talk) 14:26, 2 February 2011 (UTC)


TURBOSHAFTS

Marine Olympus : Frigates, hydrofoils, air cushion vehicles and planing craft ; Industrial Olympus : 15 Megawatt turbo-generator set ;

Marine Proteus : HMS Brave class fast patrol boats, Vosper Ferocity fast patrol boat, Vosper Mercury express yacht, Fast patrol boats for the Federal German Navy and the Royal Danish Navy, Motor gun boats and motor torpedo boats for the Italian and Swedish Navies A special version of the Marine Proteus is used in Donald Campbell's Bluebird ; Industrial Proteus : 3 Megawatt turbo-generator sets ;

de Havilland Gnome : Agusta Bell 101 G, Agusta Bell 204 B, Boeing/Vertol 107, Westland Wessex, Westland Whirlwind ;

Nimbus : Westland Scout, Westland Wasp, Westland SR-N2 Hovercraft ;

Turmo : Vickers Armstrongs VA 3 Hovercraft, Admiralty landing craft ;


RAMJETS

Bristol Thor : Bristol/Ferranti Bloodhound ground-to-air missile ;

Bristol Odin (secret, so unpublished in 1962 : Hawker Siddeley Sea Dart long-range ship-to-air missile) ;

ROCKET ENGINES

Gamma : Black Knight space research vehicle ;

Armstrong Siddeley Stentor : Avro Blue Steel stand-off bomb ;

PR 37 : Jindivik ;

AUXILIARY POWER UNITS

Blackburn-Turbomeca Artouste : Canadair CL 44, de Havilland Trident, Handley Page Victor, Short Belfast ; Cumulus : Advanced strike aircraft ;

Blackburn-Turbomeca Palouste : Canadair CL 66, Ground starting units ;

Blackburn-Turbomeca Palas

Blackburn-Turbomeca A129

DIESEL ENGINES MD Series : British Transport Commission Type 3 and 4 locomotives, Brush Falcon locomotive, Blacktail fleet of trawlers, Vosper patrol boats for the Malayan Government, 1200 kW generator sets ;


PISTON ENGINES (AERO)

See also : Armstrong Siddeley, Blackburn Aircraft, and de Havilland Engine Company

Blackburn Cirrus Bombardier

Blackburn Cirrus Minor

Blackburn Cirrus Major

Blackburn Cirrus Midget

Bristol Centaurus 18 cylinder sleeve valve radial, types 173 & 673 max takeoff 2850 BHP, SFC 0.44 lb/BHP/hr at 1720 BHP at 11500 ft, dia 1450 mm, wt 1540 kg : Blackburn Beverley, de Havilland Elizabethan, Hawker Sea Fury;

Bristol Hercules 14 cylinder sleeve valve radial, Types 730, 750 & 790 Max takeoff 2040 BHP, SFC 0.435lb/BHP/hr at 1215 BHP at 10750 ft : Bristol Freighter, CASA 207 Azor, Handley Page Hastings, Handley Page Hermes, Nord-Aviation Noratlas, Short Solent, Vickers Viking, Vickers Valetta, Vickers Varsity ; Over 70,000 built by 1960, with over 1 million flying hours per year from 1952 on.

Bristol Cheetah 1932 7 cylinder radial, 300-475 hp.: Airspeed Consul, Envoy, Oxford, Queen Wasp, Viceroy. Argentine DL22. Avro Anson, Prefect, 626. CASA Alcotan. Handley Page Trainer. Hispano HS42. Hunting Percival Provost. Koolhoven Fk51 ;


de Havilland Gipsy Major : Beagle-Auster Terrier, de Havilland Chipmunk, de Havilland Tiger Moth ; de H Gipsy Queen : de Havilland Dove, de Havilland Heron Gipsy Six : de Havilland Dragon Rapide ;

Puma 1917, 6 cyl, inline water cooled, 240hp : Bristol Tourer, Trainer, Type 81. de Havilland 4, 9, and 50 ;

Bristol Jupiter 1920, 9 cyl radial, 368-595 hp : Bristol badger, Bloodhound, Bulldog, Bullfinch, Ten seater and 118. de Havilland 61 and 66 Giant Moth. Dornier DOX. Handley Page Hinaidi, 42 and 45. Hawker Heron and Woodcock. Parnall Plover. Short Calcutta, Kent, Scylla and Springbok. Westland Wapiti and Weasel;

Armstrong Siddeley Jaguar 1922 14 cyl 2 row radial, 300-480 hp, geared or not, supercharged or not : Armstrong Whitworth Ajax, Argosy, Atlas, Siskin, Starling Wolf. Avro 636 and 642. Blackburn Civil Biplane, turcock. Fairey Flycatcher. Farman Goliath. Fokker C6, D16. Gloster Gnatsnapper and Grebe. Handley Page Hare. Hawker Danecock. Heinkel He VIII. Supermarine Nanok Flying Boat. Svenska Jaktfalk. Vickers Vespa; Qinj (talk) 12:38, 20 February 2011 (UTC)

Cherub 1922 flat twin, 24-36 hp : Avro Avis. Beardmore Wee Bee. Bristol Brownie. Parnall Pixie. Short Satellite. Vickers Vagabond ;

Bristol Lucifer 1923 3 cyl radial, 10-140 hp : Avro 504K. Bristol Lucifer Trainer and Taxiplane. Handley Page Hamlet ;

Armstrong Siddeley Lynx 1925 7 cyl radial, 150-220 hp : Airspeed Courier. Avro 10, 504N, Commodore and Tutor. Blackburn Lincock. Canadian Vickes Vancouver, Vedette. Cierva Autogiro. Comte AC 11-V. de Havilland Hawk Moth. Fairchild FC2. Fokker F7. Piaggio P11. Supermarine Seamew. Svenska Pivat ;


Bristol Mongoose 1926 5 cyl radial, 165 hp : Avro Gosport and Trainer. Fokker S4. Handley Page Gugnunc. Hawker Tomtit. Svenska Falken ; Serval 1926 Double Mongoose 10 cyl, 2 row radial, 365 hp : Armstrong Whitworth Atalanta. Saunders-Roe Saro Cloud ;

Bristol Mercury 1926 9 cyl supercharged and geared radial, 540-890 hp : Bristol Blenheim, Britain First, Bulldog, Bullpup and 101. Gloster Gauntlet, Gladiator, and Gnatsnapper. Hawker F7/30 and Hoopoe. Miles Martinet and Master. Supermarine Sea Otter. Westland Lysander.

Bristol Leopard 1928 14 cyl 2 row radial, 750 hp : Blackburn Iris. Hawker Dantorp, Horsley. Junkers J52 ;

Neptune 1929 7 cyl radial, 315 hp : Bristol 110A ;

Titan 1929 5 cyl radial, 220 hp : Bristol 83E (geared Titan). Fokker F-VIII B ;

Genet 1929 5 cyl, or 7 cyl (Genet Major), radial, 80-140 hp : Avro Avian, Cadet, 61, 624, 625. Blackburn Bluebird. Canadian Vickers Vigil, Vista. Cierva Autogiro. de Havilland Moth. Junkers Junior. Saunders-Roe Cutty Sark. Westland Pterodactyl, Wessex ;

Panther 1930 14 cyl 2 row radial, 600-750 hp : Armstrong Whitworth AW16, Scimitar. Avro 627 Mailplane. Fairey Gordon, Seal. Fokker CV. Hawker Fury (Norway). Junkers K43, W34. Westland Wapiti (South Africa) ;

Draco 1932 9 cyl supercharged radial with direct petrol injection., 590 hp : Westland Wapiti ;

Tiger 1932 14 cy 2 row radial, 750-880 hp : 1st prodn aero-engine in world with 2 stage supercharger. Armstrong Whitworth Ensign, Whitley, 29. Blackburn Ripon, Shark ;

Bristol Perseus 1932 9 cyl sleeve valve radial, 580-905 hp : Blackburn Botha, Roc, Skua. Bristol Bulldog. de Havilland Flamingo. Hawker Hart. Short C class flying boats. Vickers Vellox and Wildebeeste. Westland Lysander ;

Phoenix 1932 9 cyl radial with compression ignition, 485 hp : Westland Wapiti ;

Pegasus 1932 9 cyl supercharged radial, 570-1010 hp: Boulton and Paul Overstrand. Bristol Bombay and 120. Fairey Swordfish. handley page Harrow. Hawker Hart. Short C class flying boats, Sunderland. Supermarine Walrus. Vickers Valentia, Wildebeeste, and Wellington. Westland Wallace ;

Cheetah 1932 7 cyl radial, 300-475 hp : Airspeed Consul, Envoy, Oxford, Queen Wasp, Viceroy. Argentine DL22. Avro Anson, Prefect, 626. CASA Alcotan. Handley Page Trainer. Hispano HS42. Hunting Percival Provost. Koolhoven Fk51 ;

Aquila 1934 9 cyl sleeve valve radial, 460-690 hp : Bristol Bulldog, Bullpup, and 143. Vickers Venom ;

Taurus 1936 14 cyl 2 row sleeve valve radial, 1050-1065 hp : Bristol Beaufort and 148. Fairey Albacore ;

Qinj (talk) 13:07, 13 February 2011 (UTC)

Qinj (talk) 11:18, 12 January 2011 (UTC) Qinj (talk) 11:24, 12 January 2011 (UTC)

No problem recording the text here, or you can create a special page for it in your user space that no-one else should alter without your permission.
It's on the talk pages that you sign with "~~~~". For edits to articles, just include a summary of what you have added. We need to merge the information from the two publications because some of it is duplicated. What is the copyright status of the documents that you copied? It might be necessary to re-phrase the information in your own words. Best wishes. Dbfirs 17:59, 12 January 2011 (UTC)

Note that the two BSEL booklet introductions have now been combined on the main page, but i want to leave them separate on my talk page.Qinj (talk) 15:35, 14 January 2011 (UTC)

That's excellent, though the text needs to be formatted to a style suited to an encyclopaedia, and not just copied from other documents. If you want to copy or move the documents to a subspace of your user page (e.g. User:Qinj/BSEL booklets that I created as an example), then the text should be even safer there provided that it is not copyright. Dbfirs 17:03, 14 January 2011 (UTC)

January 2011[edit]

Welcome to Wikipedia. Everyone is welcome to make constructive contributions to Wikipedia, but at least one of your recent edits, such as the one you made to Turbo-Union RB199, did not appear to be constructive and has been automatically reverted (undone) by ClueBot NG.

  • Please use the sandbox for any test edits you would like to make, and take a look at the welcome page to learn more about contributing to this encyclopedia. Note that human editors do monitor recent changes to Wikipedia articles, and administrators have the ability to block users from editing if they repeatedly engage in vandalism.
  • ClueBot NG produces very few false positives, but it does happen. If you believe the change you made should not have been detected as unconstructive, please read about it, report it here, remove this warning from your talk page, and then make the edit again.
  • The following is the log entry regarding this warning: Turbo-Union RB199 was changed by Qinj (u) (t) ANN scored at 0.867992 on 2011-01-20T13:56:37+00:00 . Thank you. ClueBot NG (talk) 13:56, 20 January 2011 (UTC)
Yes, please keep to your usual excellent facts in Wikipedia, not shouted opinion, however strongly you feel about it. Dbfirs 21:28, 20 January 2011 (UTC)

February 2011[edit]

Welcome to Wikipedia. Although everyone is welcome to contribute to Wikipedia, at least one of your recent edits, such as the one you made to AFVG, did not appear to be constructive and has been reverted or removed. Please use the sandbox for any test edits you would like to make, and read the welcome page to learn more about contributing constructively to this encyclopedia. Thank you. Bzuk (talk) 19:58, 4 February 2011 (UTC)

You may have worked on the AFVG, but the BAC P.45 was a moribund project by 1965 and was certainly not the UKVG c. 1967. FWiW Bzuk (talk) 21:05, 4 February 2011 (UTC).
The BAC P.45 designed to meet a fighter/trainer requirement was a much smaller aircraft. See illustration. Bzuk (talk) 21:24, 4 February 2011 (UTC).