10 metre air pistol

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
10 metre air pistol
Kostevych Munich 2006 event.jpg
Men
Number of shots: 60 + 20
Olympic Games: Since 1988
World Championships: Since 1970
Abbreviation: AP60
Women
Number of shots: 40 + 20
Olympic Games: Since 1988
World Championships: Since 1970
Abbreviation: AP40

10 Metre Air Pistol is an Olympic shooting event governed by the International Shooting Sport Federation (ISSF). It is similar to 10 metre air rifle in that it is shot with 4.5 mm (or .177) caliber air guns at a distance of 10 metres (11 yards), and the programme consists of 60 shots within 105 minutes for men, and 40 shots within 75 minutes for women. It is also similar to 50 metre pistol despite the shorter distance and the use of air guns, and most top-level male shooters compete in both events.

There are some restrictions on the pistol, and it must be operated by one hand only from a standing, unsupported position. The shooter decides his or her own tempo as long as the maximum time is not exceeded, but in the final round for the top shooters, separate commands are given for each shot so that the audience may follow the progress of the standings.

The major competitions are the Olympic Games every four years and the ISSF World Shooting Championships every four years. In addition, the event is included in the ISSF World Cup and in continental championships, as well as in many other international and national competitions. It is an indoor sport, and on the highest level electronic targets are used instead of the traditional paper targets.

Range and target[edit]

The air pistol target is 17x17 cm with concentric score zones, the innermost (worth ten points) having a diameter of 11.5 mm.

The distance from floor level to the centre of the target is 1400mm +/- 100mm.

The air pistol range is the same as the air rifle range, giving each shooter a table, a 1 metre wide firing point, and a 10 metre distance between the firing line and the target line.[1] The current rules require ranges to be built indoors,[2] with specified minimum requirements for artificial lighting.[3] Many of the top-level competitions are held at temporary ranges installed in versatile sporting facilities or convention centres.

The target, 17 by 17 cm (6.7 by 6.7 in), is traditionally made of light-coloured cardboard upon which scoring lines, and a black aiming mark consisting of the score zones 7 through 10, are printed.[4] There is also an inner ten ring, but the number of inner tens is only used for tie-breaking.[5] The changing of these traditional targets is handled by each shooter, by means of electronic – or more archaically, manually operated – carrier devices.[6] In major competitions, only one shot may be fired on each target,[7] a number that can increase to two, five or even ten with lowering level and importance of the competition. Used targets are collected by range officials to be scored in a separate office.[8]

During the last few decades, these paper targets have been gradually replaced by electronic target systems, immediately displaying the results on monitors. When using these systems, actual scoring lines are not printed, but the location of the impact hole (which can be determined acoustically) is automatically converted into corresponding scores by a computer. ISSF rules now require the use of these systems in top-level competitions.[9] They are generally used in other international competitions as well,[10] and in some countries they are even common in national competitions.[11]

Equipment[edit]

To promote comfortable and accurate shooting from a standing position match air pistols must have fast lock times, shoot practically recoilless and vibration free and exhibit minimal movement and balance shifts during discharge. The pistol must also be able to be tailored by adjustable user interfaces and various accessories to individual shooters personal preferences. Combined with appropriate match pellets the pistol has to produce a consistent 10 ring performance, so a non maximal result during the initial phase can be attributed to the participant.

The pistols used are gas-driven with a caliber of 4.5 mm (.177 in). The minimum trigger pull weight is 500 gram (17.6 oz), half that of a sport pistol, and the grip restrictions are similar to sport pistols, but the box in which the pistol must fit is much larger: 42 by 20 by 5 cm (17 by 8 by 2 in).[12] This allows for longer sight lines and also gives room for cocking arms, although with a few exceptions (such as the Baikal IZH-46M) modern match air pistols use pre-filled air, or less commonly carbon dioxide, containers.[13] The maximum overall weight is 1.5 kg (3.31 lb). The pistol must be operated by only one hand from a standing position, and may only be loaded with one pellet at a time.[14]

A typical 4.5 mm (.177 in) 10 m air pistol match pellet

For the 10 metre air pistol and air rifle disciplines match diabolo pellets are used. These pellets have wadcutter heads, meaning the front is (nearly) flat, that leave clean round holes in paper targets for easy scoring. Match pellets are offered in tins and more elaborate packagings that avoid deformation and other damage that could impair their uniformity. Air gunners are encouraged to perform shooting group tests with their gun clamped in a machine rest to establish which particular match pellet type performs best for their particular air gun.[15] To facilitate maximum performance out of various air guns the leading match pellet manufacturers produce pellets with graduated "head sizes", which means the pellets are offered with front diameters from 4.48 mm up to 4.51 mm.

As in other ISSF pistol events, special supportive clothing and shoes are not permitted.[16] Optical aids are allowed as long as they are not mounted on the pistol, which may only have open sights.[17] Ear protection is recommended by the ISSF[18] as well as by coaches, who sometimes stress their usefulness in shutting out distracting noise rather than their necessity for safety reasons (paramount in other shooting disciplines).[19][20]

It is each shooter's responsibility to get the pistol and shoes validated in a specific area, the equipment control, prior to starting the competition. Clothing is only inspected during the actual competition.[21] To discourage shooters from lowering the trigger pull weight after passing the equipment control, random controls are conducted after the match with failure resulting in immediate disqualification.[22]

Match air pistols in production[edit]

Steyr LP10 PCP air pistol

The following air pistols are in production as of 2013:[citation needed]

Course of fire[edit]

Shooters are generally divided into four classes: men, junior men, women and junior women. The junior classes are included in most championships, with some notable exceptions (such as the Olympic Games and the ISSF World Cup). A shooter remains a junior up to and including the calendar year in which he or she becomes 20 years of age, although a junior may opt to participate in the main class instead.[23]

In both the qualification stage and the final stage, all shooting is supervised by a Chief Range Officer, whose duties include responsibility for the correct behaviour of all personnel, dealing with technical irregularities, and cooperation with the jury.[24]

Qualification[edit]

For the qualification stage, the shooters are divided as necessary into relays.[25] Each relay starts with a ten-minute preparation time,[26] followed by the Chief Range Officer's "Start" command, indicating the start of the competition time.[27] Before the competition shots, but within the time limit, the shooter may fire an unlimited number of sighting shots at specially marked targets.[28] Men and junior men shoot 60 shots (within a maximum time of 105 minutes) at all major competitions, while women and junior women shoot 40 shots (within a maximum time of 75 minutes).[7] At minor competitions, there may be other numbers of shots and time limits.

Final[edit]

Men's 10 meter air pistol final in the 2012 Olympic Games Shooting competition at the Royal Artillery Barracks.

A final is included in most air pistol championships, although not in the World Junior Championships. The top eight shooters advance to the final.[29] In case of a tie for eighth place, shooters with stronger ending were previously preferred.[30] The score zones are divided into tenths (by means of a special gauge, in the absence of automatic scoring devices), so that each hit can give up to 10.9 points. After a three-minute preparation time, during which the shooters are introduced to the audience, and a five-minute sighting shot period, separate commands are given for each competition shot with a time limit of 75 seconds per shot. Starting from 2013, the final consists of 2 strings of 3 shots, after which for every two additional shots, the lowest scoring finalist will be dropped. This continues until only two finalists left making the final two shots for the gold. Hence the last two men would have 20 shots in total. Due to this new rule, all pre-2013 finals record will be erased. The current record of 2013 will be considered as provisional, until the end of 2013 which the ISSF will decide whether to scrap the final record altogether from then on, or keep them.[31] The final score is added to the qualification score with the aggregate deciding the final ranking.[32] Any post-final ties are broken by a single extra shot.[33]

History[edit]

Spring-piston air guns were in common use during the first decades of the sport, but are now seldom seen at high levels.

The air pistol event was introduced on the World Championship level in 1970,[34] and on the Olympic programme in 1988.[35] Before 1985, when finals began to be used, championships were decided by the results of the 40 or 60 shot match. Before 1982, the men's programme also consisted of 40 shots.[34]

As in many other ISSF events, the target for air pistol was reduced in size in 1989, also lowering the scores (although not by much), and thereby resetting all records. The development after this shows a contrast to that of air rifle shooting: whereas in air rifle the winning score of the 1989 World Championships would not have reached the final 17 years later,[36][37] the same result increase has not occurred in air pistol, and Sergei Pyzhianov's world record of 593 points, set in the first World Cup Final with the new targets, remained unbeaten for almost 20 years.[38]

Although competitions are no longer held outdoors, the most important competitions (Olympics, World Championships, World Cups) are still scheduled for the Northern Hemisphere summer season because they are combined with outdoor events. Many lesser international events, however, are held during the European indoor season between October and March, culminating in the European Championships each year. Most of these competitions are multi-day events held together with air rifle matches.[39]

World Championships, Men[edit]

This event was held in 1970-2010.

Year Place Gold Silver Bronze
1970 United States Phoenix  Kornel Marosvari (HUN)  Vladimir Stolipin (URS)  Harald Vollmar (GDR)
1974 Switzerland Thun  Grigori Kosych (URS)  Corneliu Ion (ROM)  Jean Faggion (FRA)
1978 South Korea Seoul  Paavo Palokangas (FIN)  Seppo Saarenpaeae (FIN)  Paulo Lamego (BRA)
1979 South Korea Seoul  Geoffrey Robinson (GBR)  Thomas Guinn (CAN)  Ragnar Skanåker (SWE)
1981 Dominican Republic Santo Domingo  Don Nygord (USA)  Ljubtcho Diakov (BUL)  Ragnar Skanåker (SWE)
1982 Venezuela Caracas  Vladas Turla (URS)  Alexsander Melentiev (URS)  Anatoli Egrishin (URS)
1983 Austria Innsbruck  Ragnar Skanåker (SWE)  Alexsander Melentiev (URS)  Anatoli Egrishin (URS)
1985 Mexico Mexico City  Rolf Beutler (SUI)  Jens Potteck (GDR)  Pierre Bremond (FRA)
1986 East Germany Suhl  Igor Basinski (URS)  Uwe Potteck (GDR)  Pierre Bremond (FRA)
1987 Hungary Budapest  Zoltan Papanitz (HUN)  Alexsander Melentiev (URS)  Ljubtcho Diakov (BUL)
1989 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Sarajevo  Sergei Pyzhianov (URS)  Uwe Potteck (GDR)  Sorin Babii (ROM)
1990 Soviet Union Moscow  Bernardo Tobar (COL)  Istvan Agh (HUN)  Boris Kokorev (URS)
1991 Norway Stavanger  Uwe Potteck (GER)  Yifu Wang (CHN)  Sorin Babii (ROM)
1994 Italy Milan  Franck Dumoulin (FRA)  Igor Basinski (BLR)  Roberto Di Donna (ITA)
1998 Spain Barcelona  Yifu Wang (CHN)  Igor Basinski (BLR)  Kanstantsin Lukashyk (BLR)
2002 Finland Lahti  Mikhail Nestruev (RUS)  Andrija Zlatic (YUG)  Franck Dumoulin (FRA)
2006 Croatia Zagreb  Wei Pang (CHN)  Jakkrit Panichpatikum (THA)  Vladimir Gontcharov (RUS)
2010 Germany Munich  Tomoyuki Matsuda (JPN)  Andrija Zlatic (SRB)  Jin Jong-Oh (KOR)
2014 Spain Granada TBD TBD TBD
2018 South Korea Changwon TBD TBD TBD

World Championships, Men Team[edit]

This event was held in 1970-2010.

Year Place Gold Silver Bronze
1970 United States Phoenix Soviet Union Soviet Union
Anatoli Egrishin
Grigori Kosych
Evgeni Raskazov
Vladimir Stolipin
Finland Finland
Immo Huhtinen
Seppo Makinen
Matti Juhani Patteri
Seppo Saarenpaeae
West Germany Federal Republic of Germany
Heinrich Fretwurst
Heinz Mertel
Ernst Mueller
Manfred Moeller
1974 Switzerland Thun Soviet Union Soviet Union
Anatoli Egrishin
Grigori Kosych
Valeri Margasov
Vladimir Stolipin
West Germany Federal Republic of Germany
Manfred Deichmann
Heinrich Fretwurst
Dieter Gruetz
Wolfgang Labenski
East Germany German Democratic Republic
Helmut Artelet
Heinz Szurlies
Matthias Hoeflitz
Harald Vollmar
1978 South Korea Seoul Finland Finland
Teemu Anttila
Seppo Mäkinen
Paavo Palokangas
Seppo Saarenpää
Brazil Brazil
Paulo Lamego
Wilson Scheidemantel
Benevenuto Tilli
Bertino Souza
Sweden Sweden
Weith Andersson
Ove Gunnarsson
Staffan Oscarsson
Ragnar Skanåker
1979 South Korea Seoul Sweden Sweden
Weith Andersson
Stig Borje Nilsson
Staffan Oscarsson
Ragnar Skanåker
United States United States of America
Jimmie Dorsey
Don Hamilton
Samual Hunter
Don Nygord
South Korea Korea
Jang Sik Kim
Won Suk Lee
Tae Ho Lim
Seung Lin Park
1981 Dominican Republic Santo Domingo Bulgaria Bulgaria
Ljubtcho Diakov
Liubcho Dimitrov
Ivan Mandov
Jean Mihov
Switzerland Switzerland
Rolf Beutler
Roman Burkhard
Jacques Alain Perrin
Rene von Gunten
Soviet Union Soviet Union
Igor Basinski
Anatoli Egrishin
Alexander Sniezhko
Sergei Sumatokhin
1982 Venezuela Caracas Soviet Union Soviet Union
Anatoli Egrishin
Alexsander Melentiev
Sergei Sumatokhin
Vladas Turla
United States United States of America
Erich Buljung
Jimmie Mc Coy
Don Nygord
Darius Young
Sweden Sweden
Weith Andersson
Stig Borje Nilsson
Benny Oestlund
Ragnar Skanåker
1983 Austria Innsbruck Soviet Union Soviet Union
Anatoli Egrishin
Alexsander Melentiev
Vladas Turla
Sweden Sweden
Benny Oestlund
Staffan Oscarsson
Ragnar Skanåker
France France
Jean Bilon
Jacky Durand
Remy Harang
1985 Mexico Mexico City Soviet Union Soviet Union
Anatoli Egrishin
Boris Kokorev
Vladas Turla
France France
Pierre Bremond
Philippe Cola
Remy Harang
United States United States of America
George Ross
Arnold Vitarbo
Darius Young
1986 East Germany Suhl Soviet Union Soviet Union
Igor Basinski
Boris Kokorev
Alexsander Melentiev
France France
Pierre Bremond
Philippe Cola
Remy Harang
East Germany German Democratic Republic
Gernot Eder
Jens Potteck
Uwe Potteck
1987 Hungary Budapest Soviet Union Soviet Union
Anatoli Egrishin
Boris Kokorev
Alexsander Melentiev
East Germany German Democratic Republic
Gernot Eder
Jens Potteck
Uwe Potteck
Bulgaria Bulgaria
Ljubtcho Diakov
Tanyu Kiryakov
Sabi Sabev
1989 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Sarajevo Soviet Union Soviet Union
Sergei Barmin
Alexsander Melentiev
Sergei Pyzhianov
Italy Italy
Roberto Di Donna
Dario Palazzani
Vincenzo Spilotro
Hungary Hungary
Csaba Gyorik
Zsolt Karacs
Zoltan Papanitz
1990 Soviet Union Moscow Soviet Union Soviet Union
Boris Kokorev
Mikhail Nestruev
Sergei Pyzhianov
Hungary Hungary
Istvan Agh
Csaba Gyorik
Zoltan Papanitz
East Germany German Democratic Republic
Gernot Eder
Uwe Potteck
Jens Potteck
1991 Norway Stavanger Soviet Union Soviet Union
Sergei Barmin
Boris Kokorev
Sergei Pyzhianov
Germany Germany
Gernot Eder
Hans-Juergen Bauer-Neumaier
Uwe Potteck
China People's Republic of China
Jinbao Li
Yifu Wang
Haifeng Xu
1994 Italy Milan China People's Republic of China
Haifeng Xu
Yifu Wang
Shengge Zhang
Italy Italy
Vigilio Fait
Roberto Di Donna
Vincenzo Spilotro
Hungary Hungary
Csaba Gyorik
Zsolt Karacs
Zoltan Papanitz
1998 Spain Barcelona China People's Republic of China
Yifu Wang
Dan Xu
Hui Wu
Russia Russia
Mikhail Nestruev
Vladimir Gontcharov
Boris Kokorev
Belarus Belarus
Igor Basinski
Kanstantsin Lukashyk
Siarhei Yurusau
2002 Finland Lahti Russia Russia
Mikhail Nestruev
Vladimir Gontcharov
Vladimir Isakov
China People's Republic of China
Yifu Wang
Zongliang Tan
Huaiyu Li
Ukraine Ukraine
Oleg Dronov
Victor Makarov
Ivan Rybovalov
2006 Croatia Zagreb China People's Republic of China
Wei Pang
Zhongzai Lin
Zongliang Tan
Russia Russia
Mikhail Nestruev
Vladimir Isakov
Vladimir Gontcharov
France France
Walter Lapeyre
Manuel Alexandre-Augrand
Franck Dumoulin
2010 Germany Munich Russia Russia
Sergey Chervyakovskiy
Leonid Ekimov
Vladimir Isakov
Serbia Serbia
Andrija Zlatic
Damir Mikec
Dimitrije Grgic
South Korea Korea
Jin Jong-Oh
Lee Dae-Myung
Han Seung Woo
2014 Spain Granada TBD TBD TBD
2018 South Korea Changwon TBD TBD TBD

World Championships, Women[edit]

This event was held in 1970-2010.

Year Place Gold Silver Bronze
1970 United States Phoenix  Sally Carroll (USA)  Nina Rasskazova (URS)  Nina Stoliarova (URS)
1974 Switzerland Thun  Zinaida Simonian (URS)  Anisoara Matei (ROM)  Nina Stoliarova (URS)
1978 South Korea Seoul  Kerstin Hansson (SWE)  Gun Naesman (SWE)  Yang Ja Moon (KOR)
1979 South Korea Seoul  Ruby Fox (USA)  Patricia Dench (AUS)  Sally Carroll (USA)
1981 Dominican Republic Santo Domingo  Nonna Kalinina (URS)  Kerstin Bodin (SWE)  Marina Dobrantcheva (URS)
1982 Venezuela Caracas  Marina Dobrantcheva (URS)  Auksne Treinite (URS)  Inna Rose (URS)
1983 Austria Innsbruck  Kerstin Bodin (SWE)  Julita Macur (POL)  Yang Ja Kim (KOR)
1985 Mexico Mexico City  Marina Dobrantcheva (URS)  Irada Ashumova (URS)  Maritha Karlsson (SWE)
1986 East Germany Suhl  Anke Voelker (GDR)  Marina Dobrantcheva (URS)  Haiying Liu (CHN)
1987 Hungary Budapest  Jasna Brajkovic (YUG)  Svetlana Smirnova (URS)  Anne Goffin (BEL)
1989 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Sarajevo  Nino Salukvadze (URS)  Jasna Šekarić (YUG)  Lieselotte Breker (FRG)
1990 Soviet Union Moscow  Jasna Šekarić (YUG)  Marina Logvinenko (URS)  Svetlana Smirnova (URS)
1991 Norway Stavanger  Marina Logvinenko (URS)  Shuanghong Li (CHN)  Margit Stein (GER)
1994 Italy Milan Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Jasna Šekarić (IOP)  Margit Stein (GER)  Galina Belyayeva (KAZ)
1998 Spain Barcelona  Munkhbayar Dorjsuren (MGL)  Yoko Inada (JPN)  Lalita Yauhleuskaya (BLR)
2002 Finland Lahti  Olena Kostevych (UKR)  Nino Salukvadze (GEO)  Olga Kousnetsova (RUS)
2006 Croatia Zagreb  Natalia Paderina (RUS)  Jun Hu (CHN)  Viktoria Chaika (BLR)
2010 Germany Munich  Zorana Arunovic (SRB)  Lalita Yauhleuskaya (AUS)  Viktoria Chaika (BLR)
2014 Spain Granada TBD TBD TBD
2018 South Korea Changwon TBD TBD TBD

World Championships, Women Team[edit]

This event was held in 1970-2010.

Year Place Gold Silver Bronze
1970 United States Phoenix Soviet Union Soviet Union
Nina Stoliarova
Nina Rasskazova
Nadezda Ibragimova
West Germany Federal Republic of Germany
Ortrud Feickert
Karin Fitzner
Ruth Kasten
United States United States of America
Lucile Chambliss
Sally Carroll
Barbara Hile
1974 Switzerland Thun Soviet Union Soviet Union
Zinaida Simonian
Nina Stoliarova
Galina Zarikova
United States United States of America
Sharon Best
Barbara Hile
Ruby Fox
West Germany Federal Republic of Germany
Karin Fitzner
Ruth Kasten
Ortrud Feickert
1978 South Korea Seoul Sweden Sweden
Kerstin Hansson
Gun Näsman
Ingridh Strömqvist
Australia Australia
Julie Aitken
Patricia Dench
Maureen Hill
South Korea Korea
Kwan Seok Kang
Yang Ja Kim
Yang Ja Moon
1979 South Korea Seoul United States United States of America
Sally Carroll
Ruby Fox
Patricin Olsowsky
Sweden Sweden
Kerstin Hansson
Gun Naesman
Sally Remmert
United Kingdom Great Britain
Carol Bartlett
Rosemarie Edgar
Trudy Henry
1981 Dominican Republic Santo Domingo Soviet Union Soviet Union
Marina Dobrantcheva
Nonna Kalinina
Zinaida Simonian
Switzerland Switzerland
Veronica Edelmann
Doris Hafen
Elisabeth Sager
United States United States of America
Carol Baker
Ruby Fox
Sally Carroll
1982 Venezuela Caracas Soviet Union Soviet Union
Marina Dobrantcheva
Inna Rose
Auksne Treinite
China People's Republic of China
Jianmin Gao
Yi Nang
Zhifang Wen
Sweden Sweden
Monica Aberg
Chris Johansson
Gun Naesman
1983 Austria Innsbruck Sweden Sweden
Monica Aberg
Kerstin Bodin
Sally Remmert
Austria Austria
Corinna Hoffmann
Christine Strahalm
Christa Werk
United States United States of America
Sally Carroll
Ruby Fox
Cathy Graham
1985 Mexico Mexico City Soviet Union Soviet Union
Irada Ashumova
Marina Dobrantcheva
Inna Rose
Sweden Sweden
Kerstin Bodin
Britt Marie Ellis
Maritha Karlsson
West Germany Federal Republic of Germany
Angelika Hermann
Kirsten Steinert
Margit Stein
1986 East Germany Suhl Soviet Union Soviet Union
Marina Dobrantcheva
Irina Kotcherova
Lalita Tsvetkova
East Germany German Democratic Republic
Diana Mueller
Heidrun Richter
Anke Voelker
Sweden Sweden
Kerstin Bodin
Britt Marie Ellis
Maritha Karlsson
1987 Hungary Budapest Soviet Union Soviet Union
Nino Salukvadze
Svetlana Smirnova
Lalita Tsvetkova
Poland Poland
Dorota Bidolach
Maria Janicka-Janda
Julita Macur
West Germany Federal Republic of Germany
Lieselotte Breker
Anetta Kalinowski
Margit Stein
1989 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Sarajevo West Germany Federal Republic of Germany
Lieselotte Breker
Anetta Kalinowski
Margit Stein
Soviet Union Soviet Union
Olga Shilenok
Nino Salukvadze
Svetlana Smirnova
Hungary Hungary
Agnes Ferencz
Anna Gonczi
Marta Kotroczo
1990 Soviet Union Moscow Soviet Union Soviet Union
Marina Logvinenko
Nino Salukvadze
Svetlana Smirnova
West Germany Federal Republic of Germany
Lieselotte Breker
Monika Schilleder
Margit Stein
Bulgaria Bulgaria
Mariya Grozdeva
Margarita Shkodrova
Tania Staneva
1991 Norway Stavanger Soviet Union Soviet Union
Olga Klochneva
Marina Logvinenko
Nino Salukvadze
Germany Germany
Lieselotte Breker
Margit Stein
Anke Voelker
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Yugoslavia
Ksenja Macek
Jasna Šekarić
Mirela Skoko
1994 Italy Milan China People's Republic of China
Xiaoping Fan
Duihong Li
Ge Ma
Bulgaria Bulgaria
Diana Iorgova
Mariya Grozdeva
Tania Staneva
Germany Germany
Doreen Mueller
Margit Stein
Anke Voelker
1998 Spain Barcelona Russia Russia
Galina Beliaeva
Svetlana Smirnova
Marina Logvinenko
China People's Republic of China
Yeqing Cai
Jie Ren
Luna Tao
Germany Germany
Carmen Meininger
Margit Stein
Anke Schumann
2002 Finland Lahti Russia Russia
Olga Kousnetsova
Svetlana Smirnova
Galina Beliaeva
Belarus Belarus
Viktoria Chaika
Liudmila Chabatar
Yuliya Alipava
China People's Republic of China
Luna Tao
Ying Chen
Jie Ren
2006 Croatia Zagreb China People's Republic of China
Jun Hu
Fengji Fei
Ying Chen
Belarus Belarus
Viktoria Chaika
Liudmila Chabatar
Yauheniya Haluza
Russia Russia
Natalia Paderina
Olga Kousnetsova
Svetlana Smirnova
2010 Germany Munich Australia Australia
Lalita Yauhleuskaya
Dina Aspandiyarova
Linda Ryan
South Korea South Korea
Lee Ho-Lim
Kim Byung-Hee
Park Min-Jin
China People's Republic of China
Guo Wenjun
Su Yuling
Zhang Jingjing
2014 Spain Granada TBD TBD TBD
2018 South Korea Changwon TBD TBD TBD

World Championships, total medals[edit]

 Rank  Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  USSR 29 11 9 49
2  China 7 6 4 17
3  Sweden 6 5 7 18
4  Russia 6 2 3 11
5  United States 4 3 5 12
6  Yugoslavia 3 2 1 6
7  Hungary 2 2 3 7
8  Finland 2 2 0 4
9  East Germany 1 5 4 10
10  West Germany 1 3 5 9
11  Germany 1 3 3 7
12  Australia 1 3 0 4
13  France 1 2 6 9
14  Bulgaria 1 2 3 6
15  Serbia 1 2 0 3
15   Switzerland 1 2 0 3
17  Georgia 1 1 0 2
17  Japan 1 1 0 2
19  Great Britain 1 0 1 2
19  Ukraine 1 0 1 2
21  Colombia 1 0 0 1
21  Mongolia 1 0 0 1
23  Belarus 0 4 5 9
24  Romania 0 2 2 4
25  Italy 0 2 1 3
26  Poland 0 2 0 2
27  South Korea 0 1 6 7
28  Brazil 0 1 1 2
29  Austria 0 1 0 1
29  Canada 0 1 0 1
29  Thailand 0 1 0 1
32  Belgium 0 0 1 1
32  Kazakhstan 0 0 1 1
Total 72 72 72 216

Current world records[edit]

Current world records in 10 metre air pistol
Men Qualification 594  Jin Jong-oh (KOR) April 12, 2009 Changwon (KOR) edit
Final 202.8  Hoàng Xuân Vinh (VIE) March 29, 2014 Fort Benning (USA) edit
Teams 1759  Russia (Isakov, Nestruyev, Yekimov) March 16, 2007 Deauville (FRA) edit
Junior Men Individual 588  Leonid Yekimov (RUS)
 Lukas Grunder (SUI)
March 16, 2007
May 24, 2009
Deauville (FRA)
Milan (ITA)
edit
Teams 1730  China (Zhang B., He Q., Sun K.) December 20, 2009 Doha (QAT) edit
Women Qualification 393  Svetlana Smirnova (RUS) May 23, 1998 Munich (GER) edit
Final 203.8  Heena Sidhu (IND) October 11, 2013 Munich (GER) edit
Teams 1161  Russia (Khomileva, Logvinenko, Smirnova)
 China (Chen, Guo, Tao)
August 5, 1993
December 3, 2006
Brno (CZE)
Doha (QAT)
edit
Junior Women Individual 391  Marija Mladenović (YUG) June 19, 1995 Milan (ITA) edit
Teams 1146  China (Fei, Sun, Wang) July 8, 2002 Lahti (FIN) edit

Olympic and World Champions[edit]

The ISSF publishes lists of historical champions.[35][36]

Men[edit]

A green background indicates the Olympic champion.

Year Venue Individual Team
1970 Phoenix  Kornel Marosvari (HUN)  Soviet Union
1974 Thun  Grigori Kosych (URS)  Soviet Union
1978 Seoul  Paavo Palokangas (FIN)  Finland
1979 Seoul  Geoffrey Robinson (GBR)  Sweden
1981 Santo Domingo  Don Nygord (USA)  Bulgaria
1982 Caracas  Vladas Turla (URS)  Soviet Union
1983 Innsbruck  Ragnar Skanåker (SWE)  Soviet Union
1985 Mexico City  Rolf Beutler (SUI)  Soviet Union
1986 Suhl  Igor Basinski (URS)  Soviet Union
1987 Budapest  Zoltan Papanitz (HUN)  Soviet Union Junior Men
1988 Seoul  Tanyu Kiryakov (BUL) Individual Team
1989 Sarajevo  Sergei Pyzhianov (URS)  Soviet Union  Andrei Kandikov (URS)  Hungary
1990 Moscow  Bernardo Tobar (COL)  Soviet Union
1991 Stavanger  Uwe Potteck (GER)  Soviet Union  Kanstantsin Lukashyk (URS)  France
1992 Barcelona  Wang Yifu (CHN)
1994 Milan  Franck Dumoulin (FRA)  China  Alexander Wiskepzev (RUS)  Hungary
1996 Atlanta  Roberto Di Donna (ITA)
1998 Barcelona  Wang Yifu (CHN)  China  Teemu Tiainen (FIN)  Germany
2000 Sydney  Franck Dumoulin (FRA)
2002 Lahti  Mikhail Nestruyev (RUS)  Russia  Denis Koulakov (RUS)  South Korea
2004 Athens  Wang Yifu (CHN)
2006 Zagreb  Pang Wei (CHN)  China  Pu Qifeng (CHN)  China
2008 Beijing  Pang Wei (CHN)
2010 Munich  Tomoyuki Matsuda (JPN)  Russia  Zhang Bin (CHN)  China
2010 Singapore  Denys Kushnirov (UKR)
2012 London  Jin Jong-Oh (KOR)

Women[edit]

A green background indicates the Olympic champion.

Year Venue Individual Team
1970 Phoenix  Sally Carroll (USA)  Soviet Union
1974 Thun  Zinaida Simonian (URS)
1978 Seoul  Kerstin Hansson (SWE)  Sweden
1979 Seoul  Ruby Fox (USA)  United States
1981 Santo Domingo  Nonna Kalinina (URS)  Soviet Union
1982 Caracas  Marina Dobrantcheva (URS)  Soviet Union
1983 Innsbruck  Kerstin Bodin (SWE)  Sweden
1985 Mexico City  Marina Dobrantcheva (URS)  Soviet Union
1986 Suhl  Anke Völker (GDR)  Soviet Union
1987 Budapest  Jasna Brajković (YUG)  Soviet Union Junior Women
1988 Seoul  Jasna Šekarić (YUG) Individual Team
1989 Sarajevo  Nino Salukvadze (URS)  West Germany  Mirosława Sagun-Lewandowska (POL)  Poland
1990 Moscow  Jasna Šekarić (YUG)  Soviet Union
1991 Stavanger  Marina Logvinenko (URS)  Soviet Union  Stefanie Koch (GER)  France
1992 Barcelona  Marina Logvinenko (EUN)
1994 Milan  Jasna Šekarić (YUG)  China  Karen Macary (FRA)  Denmark
1996 Atlanta  Olga Klochneva (RUS)
1998 Barcelona  Dorjsürengiin Mönkhbayar (MGL)  Russia  Viktoria Chaika (BLR)  Hungary
2000 Sydney  Tao Luna (CHN)
2002 Lahti  Olena Kostevych (UKR)  Russia  Katarzyna Szymanska (POL)  China
2004 Athens  Olena Kostevych (UKR)
2006 Zagreb  Natalia Paderina (RUS)  China  Brankica Zarić (SRB)  China
2008 Beijing  Guo Wenjun (CHN)
2010 Munich  Zorana Arunovic (SRB)  Australia  Khongorzul Tsagaandalai (MGL)  South Korea
2010 Singapore  Kim Jang-Mi (KOR)
2012 London  Guo Wenjun (CHN)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rules 6.3.12 and 6.3.15. General Technical Rules for all Shooting Disciplines, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-18 
  2. ^ Rule 6.3.6.3.4. General Technical Rules for all Shooting Disciplines, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-18 
  3. ^ Rule 6.3.15.4. General Technical Rules for all Shooting Disciplines, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-18 
  4. ^ Rule 6.3.2.6. General Technical Rules for all Shooting Disciplines, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-18 
  5. ^ Rule 8.12.2. Special Technical Rules for Pistol Shooting, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  6. ^ Rule 8.6.3.1.1.1 Special Technical Rules for Pistol Shooting, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  7. ^ a b Rule 8.15.0. Special Technical Rules for Pistol Shooting, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  8. ^ Rule 8.6.3.1.1.2. Special Technical Rules for Pistol Shooting, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  9. ^ Rule 3.5.1.4. ISSF General Regulations, International Shooting Sport Federation, November 30, 2005, archived from the original on June 10, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  10. ^ International Shooting Events, SIUS-ASCOR, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  11. ^ For example, the Megalink target system is used on club level in its native Norway. Klubber, luftpistol.no, retrieved 2008-06-16 
  12. ^ Rule 8.16.0. Special Technical Rules for Pistol Shooting, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  13. ^ Rowling, Patrick, Air Pistol Competition – A Brief History, The Air Pistol Home Page, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  14. ^ Rule 8.4.3.1. Special Technical Rules for Pistol Shooting, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  15. ^ Air Gun Testing Target Pellets Archived March 27, 2009 at the Wayback Machine
  16. ^ Rule 8.4.7. Special Technical Rules for Pistol Shooting, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  17. ^ Rule 8.4.2.3. Special Technical Rules for Pistol Shooting, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  18. ^ Rule 8.2.8. Special Technical Rules for Pistol Shooting, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  19. ^ Air Gun Shooting Sports Safety Guide, National Rifle Association, p. 5, retrieved 2008-06-04 
  20. ^ Nesbitt, Graeme, Air Pistol Shooting: beginner to club level shooter, retrieved 2008-06-04 
  21. ^ Rules 8.4.7.4 and 8.10.0. Special Technical Rules for Pistol Shooting, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  22. ^ Rule 8.4.2.6.3. Special Technical Rules for Pistol Shooting, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  23. ^ Rules 3.3.6 and 3.6.8.4.1. ISSF General Regulations, International Shooting Sport Federation, November 30, 2005, archived from the original on June 10, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  24. ^ Rules 8.2.7 and 8.5.1. Special Technical Rules for Pistol Shooting, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  25. ^ Rule 8.7.2. Special Technical Rules for Pistol Shooting, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  26. ^ Rule 8.6.4.1. Special Technical Rules for Pistol Shooting, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  27. ^ Rule 8.6.4.4.1. Special Technical Rules for Pistol Shooting, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  28. ^ Rule 8.6.4.4.2. Special Technical Rules for Pistol Shooting, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  29. ^ Rule 8.14.2.1. Special Technical Rules for Pistol Shooting, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  30. ^ Rule 8.12.2. Special Technical Rules for Pistol Shooting, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  31. ^ http://www.issf-sports.org/results/records/final_world_records.ashx
  32. ^ Rule 8.14.7. Special Technical Rules for Pistol Shooting, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  33. ^ Rule 8.14.8. Special Technical Rules for Pistol Shooting, International Shooting Sport Federation, January 16, 2006, archived from the original on June 17, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  34. ^ a b World Championships, International Shooting Sport Federation, archived from the original on May 15, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-04 
  35. ^ a b List of Olympic medalists, International Shooting Sport Federation, archived from the original on April 10, 2008, retrieved 2008-06-04 
  36. ^ a b List of World Championship medalists, International Shooting Sport Federation, archived from the original on September 27, 2007, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  37. ^ ISSF World Championships Zagreb: Final results, 10m Air Rifle Men, ISSF TV, July 24, 2006, retrieved 2008-06-19 
  38. ^ Quigley, Bm (1982), "Men's world records", Medicine and science in sports and exercise (International Shooting Sport Federation) 14 (4): 303–7, doi:10.1249/00005768-198204000-00009, ISSN 0195-9131, PMID 7132649, archived from the original on September 27, 2007, retrieved 2008-06-04 
  39. ^ ESC Calendar, European Shooting Confederation, retrieved 2008-06-04