ADC Aircraft

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Aircraft Disposals Company (Airdisco)
Industry Aviation
Fate Wound up
Founded 1920
Defunct 1930
Key people Frederick Handley Page, Frank Halford

The Aircraft Disposals Company (ADC) or Airdisco, was a British firm established in March 1920 to take advantage of the large number of World War I-surplus military aircraft on the market.[1]

History[edit]

One of the founders was Frederick Handley Page, the British aviation pioneer. ADC bought the entire available stock of surplus aircraft engines and spares, including 10,000 airframes and 30,000 engines, for the sum of £1,000,000 plus a share of any profits.[2] Many ex-military aircraft were converted to various civil roles before being sold on while others were sold to military buyers.

By 1925, it had sold 2,000 airframes and 3,000 engines, generating profits of over £2,500,000, of which half was returned to the British Treasury.[3]

The company had several sites across Britain including 11 acres (45,000 m2) of Regents Park in London known as Marylebone Green. Three of the National Aircraft Factories became part of the Aircraft Disposal Company including Aintree in Liverpool, Waddon in Croydon, and at Stockport near Manchester.

Registered Office[edit]

  • The company became known as Airdisco from its telegraph address. The company had offices at Regent House, 89 Kingsway London WC2. The company name was changed to The Imperial & Foreign Corporation Ltd and was finally wound up in 1930.

Aircraft[edit]

Aircraft engines[edit]

The company produced a small range of aircraft engines under the direction of Frank Halford, the 'Cirrus' line continued to be manufactured by Cirrus Aero Engines Ltd and their successors.[4]

See also[edit]

Related lists

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Gunston 2005, p.7.
  2. ^ Barnes 1976, pp.26-27.
  3. ^ Barnes 1976, p.27.
  4. ^ Lumsden 2003, p.54.

Bibliography[edit]