Thales Air Defence

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Thales Air Defence Limited
Type Private
Industry Defence
Founded January 26, 1993
Headquarters Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom
Products Missiles
Revenue £88.9 million GBP
Net income £15.3 million
Employees 579
Parent Thales Group
Website www.thales-airdefence.com

Thales Air Defence Limited, formerly Shorts Missile Systems, is a defence contractor based in Belfast, Northern Ireland producing short-range or close air defence missiles. The company has a turnover of approximately £70m and pre-tax profits of £7m.

Shorts Missile Systems (SMS) was established as a joint venture between Shorts' owners Bombardier and Thomson-CSF in 1993. In 2000 Thomson-CSF bought Bombardier's 50% share to become the sole owner. In the same year Thomson-CSF went through a series of mergers and acquisitions to become the Thales Group, consequently in 2001 Shorts Missile Systems was renamed Thales Air Defence Limited (TADL).

The then Shorts Missile Systems was a partner in Raytheon's Future Medium Range Air-Air Missile (FMRAAM) project, which was to replace the AIM-120 AMRAAM missile used by European air forces. In May 2000 the UK selected the MBDA Meteor to fulfil the requirement.

TADL products have been deployed by 56 armed forces around the world. The company employs around 510 people based in Belfast and Paris. The company also operates a remote facility in rural County Down, between Ballynahinch and Downpatrick where missiles are tested and stored.

Products[edit]

Javelin is a man-portable surface-to-air missile and is being replaced by Starstreak.
A High Velocity Missile (HVM) used in the air defence role. Used in many roles with man-portable, attack helicopter and vehicle mounted variants.
Built by Thales under licence from the United States for the Ministry of Defence. Hellfire is designed to defeat tanks and other individual targets while minimizing the exposure of the launch vehicle to enemy fire.

Ordered by the MoD as the FASGW(L) missile on 5 April 2011 to be operated by the Royal Navy's new Lynx Wildcat helicopter.[1]

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