Ammonium phosphate

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Ammonium phosphate[1]
Ammonium phosphate.png
Ball-and-stick model of three ammonium cations and one phosphate anion
Identifiers
CAS number 10361-65-6 YesY
ChemSpider 140090 YesY
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula H12N3O4P
Molar mass 149.09 g mol−1
Appearance White, tetrahedral crystals
Solubility in water 58.0 g/100 mL (25 °C)
Hazards
NFPA 704
Flammability code 0: Will not burn. E.g., water Health code 2: Intense or continued but not chronic exposure could cause temporary incapacitation or possible residual injury. E.g., chloroform Reactivity code 0: Normally stable, even under fire exposure conditions, and is not reactive with water. E.g., liquid nitrogen Special hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
Thermochemistry
Std enthalpy of
formation
ΔfHo298
−1671.9 kJ/mol
Related compounds
Other cations Trisodium phosphate
Tripotassium phosphate
Related compounds Diammonium phosphate
Monoammonium phosphate
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
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Infobox references

Ammonium phosphate is the salt of ammonium and phosphate. It is a highly unstable compound with the formula (NH4)3PO4. Because of its instability, it is an elusive and of no commercial value. In addition to (NH4)3PO4, a related double salt (NH4)3PO4.(NH4)2HPO4 is also recognized. It too is unstable. The instability of these salts results of their facile decomposition with evolution of ammonia:[2]

(NH4)3PO4 → H(NH4)2PO4 + NH3

In contrast to the fragile nature of the triammonium salts, diammonium phosphate (H(NH4)2PO4) is a valuable material, mainly used as a fertilizer.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lide, David R. (1998). Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (87 ed.). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press. pp. 4–42, 5–19. ISBN 0-8493-0594-2. 
  2. ^ Klaus Schrödter, Gerhard Bettermann, Thomas Staffel, Friedrich Wahl, Thomas Klein, Thomas Hofmann "Phosphoric Acid and Phosphates" in Ullmann’s Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry 2008, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim. doi:10.1002/14356007.a19_465.pub3