Angelique Widjaja

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Angelique Widjaja
黄依林
Angelique Widjaja.jpg
Country  Indonesia
Residence Bandung, Indonesia
Born (1984-12-12) 12 December 1984 (age 30)
Bandung, Indonesia
Height 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in)
Turned pro 1999
Retired 2008
Plays Right-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money US$533,037
Singles
Career record 118–86
Career titles 2 WTA, 1 ITF
Highest ranking No. 55 (31 March 2003)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open 1R (2003, 2004)
French Open 2R (2002)
Wimbledon 2R(2002, 2003)
US Open 2R (2002)
Doubles
Career record 103–69
Career titles 2 WTA, 6 ITF
Highest ranking No. 15 (2 February 2004)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open QF (2004)
French Open 3R (2002)
Wimbledon QF (2003, 2004)
US Open QF (2003)
Grand Slam Mixed Doubles results
Australian Open 2R (2004)
French Open QF (2004)
Wimbledon 1R (2004)
US Open 1R (2004)
Last updated on: 31 May 2009.
Angelique Widjaja
Medal record
Women's Tennis
Competitor for  Indonesia
Asian Games
Gold 2002 Busan Women's Team
Silver 2002 Busan Women's Doubles
Southeast Asian Games
Silver 2007 Thailand Women's Team

Angelique Widjaja (Chinese: 黄依林; pinyin: Huang Yīlín) (born 12 December 1984 in Bandung, Indonesia) is a retired Chinese Indonesian professional tennis player. She won the Junior Championships at Wimbledon in 2001, defeating Dinara Safina. She reached a peak of No.55 in the Women's Tennis Association singles rankings in March 2003, and a peak of No.15 in the doubles rankings in February 2004. She retired from the professional circuit in 2008.

Career[edit]

Widjaja started playing tennis at the age of four. She first began playing at ITF juniors events in 1998 at the age of 13. Her first professional event was an ITF event in Jakarta in April 1999, when she was 14 years old.

She enjoyed considerable success as a junior player. In 2001 she won the singles competition of the Junior Championships at Wimbledon, defeating Dinara Safina 6–4 0–6 7–5. In so doing, she became the first Indonesian to win any title at Wimbledon. In 2002 she won the doubles competition of the Australian Open Junior Championships, partnered by Gisela Dulko. That year, she also won the singles competition of the Junior Championships at the French Open. She reached a peak Junior rank of #2. Also, she obtained an invite from Hong Kong Tennis Patrons' Association to play The Hong Kong Ladies Challenge 2002 in January.

The first WTA tournament she won was the 2001 Wismilak International in Bali, a Tier III WTA event, which she entered at the age of 17 on a wildcard. She was the youngest Indonesian ever to win a WTA singles title. Her WTA singles rank prior to the tournament was #579, and as such was the lowest-ranked player ever to win a WTA singles title.

2002 was her most successful year in Grand Slam singles competition, reaching the second round at three consecutive Majors. At the French Open, she defeated Jill Craybas in the first round. She was beaten by Evie Dominikovic in the second round. At Wimbledon, she beat 15th seed Anna Smashnova in the first round, before losing to Meilen Tu in round two. At the US Open, she beat Anna Kournikova in the first round, and was eliminated in the next round by Stéphanie Foretz.

Widjaja represented Indonesia at the 2002 Asian Games in Busan, collecting a silver medal in the women's doubles with partner Wynne Prakusya, and also the gold medal in the team event.

In November 2002, she won a second WTA tournament: the Tier V event at Pattaya.

She continued to perform well in the WTA tour through 2003. After her third round exit from the Tier I tournament at Indian Wells in 2003, she reached her career's highest rank: #55. She remained in the Top 100 for the remainder of 2003.

From 2003 to 2004, Widjaja enjoyed considerable success in Doubles competition, primarily partnered by María Vento-Kabchi. The pair reached the quarterfinals at Wimbledon and the US Open in 2003, and the Australian Open and Wimbledon in 2004. They also won a Tier III WTA tour event at Bali in 2003, and reached the final of one Tier I event, the 2003 Canada Masters. Following the 2004 Australian Open, Widjaja reached No.15 in the WTA's Doubles Rankings. This was her peak doubles rank.

Through 2004, Widjaja appeared in the Mixed Doubles competition of all four Majors. Her best result came at the French Open, where she and partner Lucas Arnold Ker beat Leander Paes and Martina Navratilova to reach the quarterfinals. There, they lost to the French pair Tatiana Golovin and Richard Gasquet.

Widjaja played at the 2004 Summer Olympics at Athens. She defeated Tamarine Tanasugarn in the first round of the singles competition, but was beaten by Karolina Šprem in the second round. She also took part in the doubles competition, partnered by Wynne Prakusya, and they were eliminated in the first round.

Through 2005, Widjaja took a hiatus from professional tennis due to various injuries. Following her return in 2006, she did not replicate her previous success, and did not take part in any singles competitions in WTA or ITF events after that year, but did remain active in doubles competition.

In 2007, she was part of the Indonesian women's team that won the silver medal at the Southeast Asian Games in Thailand.

In 2008, at the age of 23, Widjaja and partner Liza Andriyani won the doubles competition of an ITF tournament in Jakarta. This would be Widjaja's last tournament, as shortly afterwards she announced that she was quitting the professional tour, saying she was burnt out by the injuries and travel requirements.[1]

During her professional career, Widjaja had recorded wins over several prominent players including Dinara Safina, Jelena Janković, Alicia Molik, Anna Smashnova, Anna Kournikova and Tamarine Tanasugarn. She was mainly coached by Meiske H. Wiguna and Deddy Tedjamukti.

She was part of Indonesia's Fed Cup team in 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2006.

WTA Tour finals (8)[edit]

Legend
Grand Slam (0)
WTA Championships (0)
Tier I (1)
Tier II (0)
Tier III (6)
Tier IV & V (1)
Olympic Games (0)

Singles (2)[edit]

Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent in the final Score
Winner 1. 30 September 2001 Indonesia Bali, Indonesia Hard South Africa Joannette Kruger 7–6(2), 7–6(4)
Winner 2. 10 November 2002 Thailand Pattaya, Thailand Hard South Korea Cho Yoon-jeong 6–2, 6–4

Doubles: 6 (2-4)[edit]

Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents in the final Score
Winner 1. 29 April 2002 Croatia Bol, Croatia Clay Italy Tathiana Garbin Russia Elena Bovina
Slovakia Henrieta Nagyová
7–5, 3–6, 6–4
Runner–up 1. 10 February 2003 Qatar Doha, Qatar Hard Venezuela María Vento-Kabchi Indonesia Wynne Prakusya
Chinese Taipei Janet Lee
1–6, 3–6
Runner–up 2. 19 May 2003 Spain Madrid, Spain Clay Italy Rita Grande South Africa Liezel Huber
United States Jill Craybas
4–6, 6–7(6)
Runner–up 3. 11 August 2003 Canada Toronto, Canada Hard Venezuela María Vento-Kabchi United States Martina Navratilova
Russia Svetlana Kuznetsova
6–3, 1–6, 1–6
Winner 2. 8 September 2003 Indonesia Bali, Indonesia Hard Venezuela María Vento-Kabchi Australia Nicole Pratt
France Émilie Loit
7–5, 6–2
Runner–up 4. 3 November 2003 Thailand Pattaya, Thailand Hard Indonesia Wynne Prakusya China Sun Tiantian
China Li Ting
4–6 3–6

ITF finals[edit]

Singles: 2 (1-1)[edit]

Legend
$100,000 tournaments
$75,000 tournaments
$50,000 tournaments
$25,000 tournaments
$10,000 tournaments
Outcome No. Date Location Surface Opponent in the final Score
Runner–up 1. 12 August 2001 Thailand Nonthaburi, Thailand Hard Chinese Taipei Hsieh Su-wei 6–7(4) 2–6
Winner 2. 7 April 2002 United Arab Emirates Dubai, UAE Hard Japan Shinobu Asagoe 7–6(4) 6–2

Doubles: 8 (6-2)[edit]

Outcome No. Date Location Surface Partner Opponents in the final Score
Winner 1. 5 November 2000 Indonesia Jakarta, Indonesia Hard Indonesia Liza Andriyani South Korea Kim Jin-Hee
South Korea Chae Kyung-yee
2–4 5–3 4–2 0–4 4–0
Winner 2. 12 November 2000 Indonesia Bandung, Indonesia Hard IndonesiaLiza Andriyani India Rushmi Chakravarthi
India Sai Jayalakshmy Jayaram
4–1, 4–2, 4–0
Winner 3. 12 March 2001 Chinese Taipei Kao-Hsiung, Chinese Taipei Hard IndonesiaDea Sumantri South Korea Kim Jin-Hee
South Korea Chae Kyung-yee
6–3, 6–2
Winner 4. 13 August 2001 Thailand Nonthaburi, Thailand Hard Indonesia Romana Tedjakusuma South Korea Kim Jin-Hee
South Korea Chae Kyung-yee
4–6, 6–3, 7–5
Runner–up 1. 1 April 2002 United Arab Emirates Dubai, UAE Hard Morocco Bahia Mouhtassine Netherlands Seda Noorlander
Germany Kirstin Freye
2–6 4–6
Winner 5. 7 November 2006 Indonesia Jakarta, Indonesia Hard Indonesia Romana Tedjakusuma South Korea Kim Hea-Mi
Japan Keiko Taguchi
walkover
Runner–up 2. 12 November 2007 India Pune, India Clay Indonesia Wynne Prakusya Hong Kong Zhang Ling
Thailand Varatchaya Wongteanchai
6–1, 5–7 (5–10)
Winner 6. 4 August 2008 Indonesia Jakarta, Indonesia Hard Indonesia Liza Andriyani South Korea Kim Jin-Hee (sr)
Chinese Taipei Chen Yi
6–3, 6–1

Singles performance timeline[edit]

To prevent confusion and double counting, information in this table is updated only once a tournament or the player's participation in the tournament has concluded.

Tournament 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Career W/L
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A A A LQ 1R 1R A A 0–2
French Open A A A 2R 1R LQ A A 1–2
Wimbledon A A A 2R 2R 1R A A 2–3
US Open A A A 2R 1R 1R A A 1–3
Grand Slam W/L 0–0 0–0 0–0 3–3 1–4 0–3 0–0 0–0 4–10
Olympic Games
Summer Olympics Not Held A Not Held 2R Not Held 1–1
Career Statistics
Tournaments Won1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 3
Overall W/L1 2–2 10–6 16–7 27–14 18–25 18–13 0–0 27–18 118–852
Win % 50% 62% 70% 66% 42% 58% N/A 60% 58%
Year End Ranking Unknown 709 148 69 95 135 N/A 228 N/A
  • 1 Includes ITF tournaments.
  • 2 The sum of wins/losses by year records from the WTA website does not add up to the career record presented on the same website.

Doubles performance timeline[edit]

To prevent confusion and double counting, information in this table is updated only once a tournament or the player's participation in the tournament has concluded.

Tournament 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Career W/L
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A A A A 1R QF A A A A 3–2
French Open A A A 3R 2R 1R A A A A 3–3
Wimbledon A A A 1R QF QF A A A A 6–3
US Open A A A 1R QF 1R A A A A 3–3
Grand Slam W/L 2–3 7–4 6–4 15–11
Olympic Games
Summer Olympics Not Held A Not Held 1R Not Held A 0–1
Career Statistics
Tournaments Won1 0 2 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 8
Overall W/L1 1–2 10–3 10–4 13–12 36–23 9–12 0–0 17–11 3–2 4–0 105–69 2
Win % 33% 70% 71% 52% 61% 43% N/A 61% 60% 100% 60%
Year End Ranking 607 290 82 18 73 102 N/A
  • 1 Includes ITF tournaments.
  • 2 The sum of wins/losses by year records from the WTA website does not add up to the career record presented on the same website.

Grand Slam Mixed Doubles Performance Timeline[edit]

To prevent confusion and double counting, information in this table is updated only once a tournament or the player's participation in the tournament has concluded.

Tournament 2004 Career W-L
Grand Slams
Australian Open 2R 1–1
French Open QF 2–1
Wimbledon 1R 0–1
U.S. Open 2R 0–1
Win-Loss 3–4 3–4

Awards[edit]

  • Achievement Award 2001 – the Asian Tennis Federation
  • The Best Women Athlete of Indonesia 2001 – RCTI

References[edit]

  1. ^ Emond, Bruce (23 September 2008). "Angelique Widjaja". The Jakarta Post. Retrieved 26 February 2010. 

External links[edit]