Bernard Dudot

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Bernard Dudot
Born (1939-01-30) January 30, 1939 (age 75)[1]
Nancy, France
Nationality French
Education Engineering
Alma mater Centre d'Etudes Supérieures des Techniques Industrielles
Occupation Engineering Director GP2 and GP3 series
Employer GP2 Series , GP3 Series

Bernard Dudot (French pronunciation: ​[beʁnaʁ dydo]) (born January 30, 1939) is a French engineer who was instrumental in the development of the turbo and normally aspirated V10 engines of Formula One while working for Alpine and Renault.[2][3] As of 2005, he is Head of Engineering of the GP2 Series.[4] He has a similar role in GP3 Series since the creation of that category.[5] He is also a consultant for Le Mans organisation.[1]

Career[edit]

Alpine and Renault years[edit]

In 1967, he joined Automobiles Alpine, after convincing Jean Rédelé. Rédelé commissioned him to organize a motor development department of their own to reduce dependence on those of Gordini, Mignotet and Moteur Moderne.[6] There he began to develop a turbo engine, which would be one of the bases for the future Renault’s Formula One turbo engine.[3][6] In 1971, he tuned a R16’s engine to be mounted on a chassis designed by André de Cortanze for the French F3 Championship.[7]

In 1973, before the merger between Alpine and Renault-Gordini, Jean Terramorsi, Chairman of the second company, sent Dudot to the United States to study the potential of turbo technology in motorsport.[8] There he was finally convinced of the possibilities.[3][2] Back in France, he went to work at the Renault Sport’s Viry-Châtillon factory where he and other developers (François Castaing and Jean-Pierre Boudy) began adapting the CH1 (a two-litre engine for F2 and Sport) to make it a smaller turbo engine.[2][9]

In early 1975, Castaing took a more administrative role and Boudy went to the design office, so Dudot was left in charge of developing an engine for Le Mans and the secret design of the 1.5-litre turbo for Formula One.[2][9] After some tests, the car fitted with the new and innovative Renault-Gordini EF1 engine, the RS01, debuted at the 1977 British Grand Prix.[2][10]

In 1980, when Castaing was transferred to other activities within Renault and left Renault Sport, Dudot was appointed Technical Director.[2][11] In 1986, he led the design of the EF15B[12] power plant, which included for the first time in Formula One the pneumatic valve return, an innovation that would have a major impact on the era of atmospheric engines.[3][13] At the end of that year, Renault ceased its turbo programme.[3] Soon after, Patrick Faure entrusted to him to design a naturally aspirated engine in view of the regulations that would take effect from 1989.[14] He devised a 3.5-litre V10 that was revolutionary at a time when other manufacturers were betting on the V8 and V12.[2][3][12]

Prost Grand Prix, USA interlude and return to Renault[edit]

At the end of 1997 Renault left the Formula One and Dudot was hired as Prost Grand Prix’s Technical Director, but in June 1999 he was replaced by Alan Jenkins.[2] In 2001, he joined Nissan’s Infiniti engine programme in the Indy Racing League as Project Manager.[15] On 26 February 2003, after some time with Menard, he was rehired by Renault as Deputy Managing Director in charge of the Renault F1 Team's engine department at Viry-Châtillon.[16][17] He left that position on April 1, 2005, and his functions were divided between Rob White and André Lainé.[18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Bernard Dudot". Oldracingcars.com. 16 November 2005. Retrieved 31 May 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "People: Bernard Dudot". Grandprix.com. Inside F1. Archived from the original on 31 May 2012. Retrieved 31 May 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f Scarborough, Craig. "Technically Challenged: Renault Innovations in Formula One". Atlas F1. ScarbsF1.com. Archived from the original on 4 June 2012. Retrieved 4 June 2012. 
  4. ^ "Bernard Dudot joins the GP2 series". Auto123.com. 5 April 2005. Retrieved 31 May 2012. 
  5. ^ "The Staff". GP3Series.com. Retrieved 31 May 2012. 
  6. ^ a b Smith, Roy (2008). Alpine & Renault: The Development of the Revolutionary Turbo F1 Car 1968 to 1979. Veloce Publishing. p. 54. ISBN 1845841778. 
  7. ^ Smith, Roy (2008). Alpine & Renault: The Development of the Revolutionary Turbo F1 Car 1968 to 1979. Veloce Publishing. p. 43. ISBN 1845841778. 
  8. ^ Smith, Roy (2008). Alpine & Renault: The Development of the Revolutionary Turbo F1 Car 1968 to 1979. Veloce Publishing. p. 47. ISBN 1845841778. 
  9. ^ a b Smith, Roy (2008). Alpine & Renault: The Development of the Revolutionary Turbo F1 Car 1968 to 1979. Veloce Publishing. p. 46. ISBN 1845841778. 
  10. ^ "RS01". Renault. Retrieved 31 May 2012. 
  11. ^ Saward, Joe (1 August 1992). "Interview: Bernard Dutot". Grandprix.com. Inside F1. Archived from the original on 4 June 2012. Retrieved 4 June 2012. 
  12. ^ a b "Renault and F1". Renault. Archived from the original on 7 February 2012. Retrieved 17 October 2011. 
  13. ^ Taulbut, Derek. "Note 89 - TurboCharging background". Grand Prix Engine Development 1906 - 2000. Grandprixengines.co.uk. Archived from the original on 4 June 2012. Retrieved 4 June 2012. 
  14. ^ "People: Patrick Faure". Grandprix.com. Inside F1. Retrieved 22 February 2012. 
  15. ^ "Friday notebook: New hire". Sportsillustrated.cnn.com. May 25, 2001. Retrieved 31 May 2012. 
  16. ^ "Engine Designer Bernard Dudot Rejoins Renault". SPEEDTV.com. 26 February 2003. Retrieved 31 May 2012. 
  17. ^ "Engine wizard Dudot rejoins Renault". autosport.com. Haymarket Publishing. 27 February 2003. Retrieved 6 June 2012. 
  18. ^ "Bernard Dudot to retire from Renault". ManipeF1.com. 16 March 2005. Archived from the original on 7 February 2012. Retrieved 31 May 2012.