Burpham, Surrey

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Coordinates: 51°15′25″N 0°32′47″W / 51.257°N 0.5463°W / 51.257; -0.5463

Burpham
St Luke's, Burpham - geograph.org.uk - 1144264.jpg
St Luke's Church, Burpham in snow with
part of the Sutherland Memorial Park
Burpham is located in Surrey
Burpham
Burpham
 Burpham shown within Surrey
Population 5,221 [1]
OS grid reference TQ015518
District Guildford
Shire county Surrey
Region South East
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town Guildford
Postcode district GU1, GU4
Dialling code 01483
Police Surrey
Fire Surrey
Ambulance South East Coast
EU Parliament South East England
List of places
UK
England
Surrey
There is also a Burpham in West Sussex, England near Arundel

Burpham /ˈbərfəm/ is a suburb of Guildford, a town in Surrey, England[2] with historic village centre. It includes George Abbot School, a parade of small shops, and the nationally recognised Sutherland Memorial Park.

Burpham is bordered by the neighbourhoods of Merrow to the south-east and Jacobs Well to the north-west. Burpham is separated from Merrow by the New Guildford Line, the railway line between Guildford and Effingham Junction.

Between Burpham and Jacobs Well is Burpham Court Farm Park, a rare breeds conservation centre that straddles the River Wey.

History[edit]

Burpham appears in Domesday Book as Borham. It was held partly by Turald (Thorold) from Roger de Montgomery and by Godfric from Thurold. Its domesday assets were: 3 hides; one mill worth 15s, 6½ ploughs, 25 acres (10 ha) of meadow, woodland worth 83 hogs. It rendered £8.[3][4]

It was, until the consecration of its church, known as the manor of Burpham or Burgham[5] in Worplesdon[6] Its owner in the 13th century was Thurstan le Despenser and it then passed through the de Wintershull (by release), Bassett, Unwyn, Wolley, Mainwaring, and finally Wyrley families by relatives. By marriage its owner became Robert Wroth the MP for Guildford in 1704, 1707 and 1714 who died in 1720.[7]

From 1720 the owner of the Manor was Baron Onslow,[5] whose title was elevated to an Earldom from a Barony in the early nineteenth century and who were frequent MPs for Guildford.

The Church of St Luke,[8] Lilac Cottage co-listed with New Inn Farmhouse a 17th-century building on London Road with extensions[9] and Pimms Row[10] are the listed buildings in the area excluding Abbotswood below. The church is an ornate nineteenth century work built in 1859 designed by Henry Woodyer[8] fronting the northwest of Sutherland Memorial Park and by a primary school.

Amenities and places of worship[edit]

Within its bounds are a Sainsbury's superstore, the Surrey County Cricket Centre, two Church of England churches, a police station, a council offices building, a long parade of shops on London Road and in its eastern straight border woodland and to the north-east the working farm of Gosden Hill Farm, partly in the Clandon civil parish and village.

Holy Spirit Church[edit]

This is a second Church of England church, known locally as "CHS" serving the parishioners alongside St Luke's. The 1960s building is an unusual structure, with a cross-shaped floorplan, where laminated wooden beams at each corner define both walls and roof.[11]

Transport[edit]

Guildford's eastern-most junction with the A3 trunk road is named The Burpham Interchange, despite the fact that there is only one on-ramp and one off-ramp. It is a restricted junction, only providing access for traffic heading to or from the London direction. This restriction has provoked opposition by the residents association as the local traffic such as from the Slyfield Business/Industrial Estate bound for the southwest including much of Guildford has no option but to pass through the village or part of it.[12]

Burpham is on several bus routes that start or finish in Guildford. It is also a stop for some services heading to or from London on the A3.

Burpham Lock is some distance from the village, on the River Wey Navigation.

Abbotswood[edit]

Abbotswood is the closest part of Burpham to Guildford and its only distinctively named neighbourhood. It comprises detached houses and the George Abbot School - it includes a road named Abbotswood and only a few other side roads off London Road such as Boxgrove Avenue; as with Burpham, within the post town of Guildford, directly north and east of the small roundabout north of Stoke Park. The land here ranges from a line of western drained fields at almost river level, named spreads, in flood times, marshland to ascending gentle slopes eastwards including the street Ganghill reaching towards the New Guildford Line railway. It has two listed buildings: Woodways[13] and Stoke Park Farm House.[14]

Sutherland Memorial Park[edit]

In the centre of the village is the Sutherland Memorial Park a 6.53 hectares (16.1 acres) open space which is a focus of community life in Burpham. The formal landscaped gardens provide for passive recreation alongside the many sporting facilities offered, and an area has been set aside and planted as a wildflower meadow.

The Park was adopted by Guildford Corporation in 1954 after the land was donated by the Duke of Sutherland under a Deed of Gift. It was given as a dedicated War Memorial in memory of the residents of Burpham who were killed on active service during the Second World War. Adjoining land was developed and incorporated in the 1990s, including a car park.

The Park has won Green Flag Awards in 2004, 2005 and 2006, in recognition of it being "an excellent example of a community park as it addresses the needs and wishes of the local community and current users".[15][16]

The multi-use pavilion is home to a local nursery school, and provides changing and other facilities for the sports undertaken in the park. There are playgrounds for all ages, including a separate toddler area and a basketball court for the teenagers.

Sports facilities include: a cricket pitch (plus practice nets); two 11-a-side and two (junior) 7-a-side football pitches; two pétanque courts; lawn bowls; and a floodlit artificial pitch providing either three tennis courts or two 5-a-side football pitches.

The Park is the home ground of Burpham Football Club, who play in the Premier Division of the Surrey Elite Intermediate League.

The Green Man[edit]

The Green Man was a former coaching inn on the original A3 route from Guildford to London; a public house had been on the site for more than 400 years.[17] The Green Man had been a 'Harvester' restaurant since 1984,[17] but was sold for redevelopment early in 2006. A proposal that the former pub be demolished and replaced by an Aldi supermarket and residential dwellings was opposed by local residents.[17] However, the opposition was unsuccessful, and after Aldi removed the roofing tiles, leaving the building vulnerable to weather damage, demolition took place in December 2008. (Aldi had previously undertaken to not demolish the building until their planning application had been approved.[17]) Opposition by local residents continues, and the Residents' Association is still campaigning for a public house on the site rather than a supermarket. Recently just under 90% of respondents to Aldi's latest planning application opposed the scheme. [18]

Collisons on the A3[edit]

Several collisions per year occur on the section of the A3 dual carriage way that runs by the Burpham junction being a London and M25 south-west approach. On Wednesday 11 December 2002, several motorists telephoned to report that a car had veered off the A3. Dispatched officers found no sign of a newly crashed vehicle at the scene but did discover the wreckage of a Vauxhall Astra, containing the remains of a man, no more than 20 metres (66 ft) from the reported crash site. The car was buried in twisted undergrowth, nose-down in a ditch, invisible from the road. A police spokesman later said: "We believe the car left the road and ended up in the ditch during July. It doesn't appear that any other vehicles were involved. The car was discovered as a result of a report from members of the public who thought they saw a car's headlights veering off the road."[19][20]

Burpham Court Farm Park[edit]

Burpham Court Farm Park is a rare breeds centre occupying a former dairy farm on land between Burpham (specifically, north of the Wey Navigation cut to Burpham Lock) and Jacobs Well. Some of the farm buildings date back to 1600. The farm straddles the River Wey on land owned by the National Trust.[21]

Former farmer Bob Dearnley died after a spillage of rat poison on the morning of 28 May 2009. Several emergency personnel were also admitted to hospital. He had been served with an eviction notice having unsuccessfully contested a court case against the council, the land owner, been arrested for affray earlier in the week of his death and incurred very large debts.[21][22]

Burpham Court Farm Park was never reopened, although signs of regeneration are becoming apparent.[23]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Census data
  2. ^ OS Explorer map 145:Guildford and Farnham. Scale: 1:25 000. Publisher:Ordnance Survey – Southampton. ISBN 978 0319239261
  3. ^ Surrey Domesday Book[dead link]
  4. ^ "Place: Burpham". (Map from geodata of Domesday Book of 1086). Domesday Map. Retrieved 25 April 2011. 
  5. ^ a b British History, University of London & History of Parliament Trust - Parish of Worplesdon - see paras 6-9 under Manor
  6. ^ Edward Wedlake Brayley, A Topographical History of Surrey, Vol. II London 1850 Free e-book
  7. ^ From: 'Parishes: Worplesdon', A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3 (1911), pp. 390-395. [1] Date accessed: 13 June 2012.
  8. ^ a b English Heritage. "Details from listed building database (1029301)". National Heritage List for England .
  9. ^ English Heritage. "Details from listed building database (1377865)". National Heritage List for England .
  10. ^ English Heritage. "Details from listed building database (1029300)". National Heritage List for England .
  11. ^ Burpham Churches website - details of Sunday services, pastoral work, etc
  12. ^ Hardy, Graham (2002-11-04). "Memorandum by Burpham Community Association (SHC 50)". Select Committee on: Housing, Planning, Local Government and the Regions. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Retrieved 2007-02-22. 
  13. ^ English Heritage. "Details from listed building database (1029340)". National Heritage List for England .
  14. ^ English Heritage. "Details from listed building database (1119784)". National Heritage List for England .
  15. ^ Confirmation of award from Nov 2006 issue of 'About Guildford', newspaper published by Guildford Borough Council
  16. ^ "Green Flag Award- The national standard for parks and green spaces". Retrieved 2007-02-22. [dead link]
  17. ^ a b c d Report of the Borough Honorary Remembrancer for the Municipal Year 2006/07 PDF (2.19 MB),
    Roger Marjoribanks, Hon. Remembrancer, Borough of Guildford (Accessed 3 May 2009)
  18. ^ http://www2.guildford.gov.uk/DLDC_Version_2/acolnetcgi.gov?ACTION=UNWRAP&RIPNAME=Root.PgeResultDetail&TheSystemkey=137525
  19. ^ http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-151325/Did-drivers-ghostly-replay-death-crash.html
  20. ^ http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1438583/Skeleton-found-five-months-after-crash.html
  21. ^ a b BBC
  22. ^ BBC [2]
  23. ^ [3]

External links[edit]