Chai Ling

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Chai Ling
Chai Ling.JPG
Chai Ling (2009)
Born (1966-04-15) April 15, 1966 (age 48)
Rizhao, Shandong, China
Alma mater Peking University
Beijing Normal University
Princeton University (MLA)
Harvard Business School (MBA)
Occupation President & Chief Operating Officer of Jenzabar
Spouse(s) Feng Congde
Robert Maginn

Chai Ling (Chinese: 柴玲; Pinyin: Chái Líng) (born April 15, 1966) has been nominated twice for the Nobel Peace Prize[1], and is the author of A Heart for Freedom: The Remarkable Journey of a Young Dissident, her Daring Escape, and her Quest to Free China's Daughters. Chai was one of the key student leaders during the Tiananmen Square protests (also known as the June Fourth Movement) of 1989.[2] She has attended Peking University, where she obtained a BA in psychology, Princeton University, where she received a MPA in public affairs and international relations, and Harvard Business School, from which she also graduated with an MBA.[3] Today, she is the founder, president, and COO of Jenzabar, Inc., as well as the founder of All Girls Allowed, an organization that is dedicated to ending China`s One-Child Policy.[4] [5]

Biography[edit]

Chai was born on April 15, 1966 to a family who placed a lot of emphasis on education; [6] both Chai’s mother and father had been doctors in the People’s Liberation Army during the 1950s. [7] Chai is the eldest of four children, [8] and is from Rizhao, in Shandong province, China. [9] In 1983, Chai Ling began her education at Peking University where she eventually earned a BA in psychology. [10] In Beijing, she met and married Feng Congde, another student leader, in 1988, a relationship that later ended in a divorce. [11] In 2001, Chai Ling married Robert Maginn (12), an American businessperson who has also been involved in politics. [12] They reside together in the United States, [13] where they have three daughters. [14] In 2009, with the support and prayers of multiple friends and mentors, Chai became a Christian and was later baptized on April 4, 2010 at Park Street Church in Boston. [15] Chai claims that her proudest moment and accomplishment has been becoming a “Jesus-follower.” [16]

Protest and Exile[edit]

Chai's fellow students elected Chai Ling as commander-in-chief of the student democracy movement during the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989. [17] She participated in the demonstrations that called upon the Chinese government for reforms and open dialogue. [18] During the demonstrations, Chai assisted in organizing the hunger strikes. [19] Ultimately, the military ended the protests on June 4, 1989 with bloodshed, and the Chinese government listed Chai as one of the 21 most wanted students. [20] After escaping from Beijing, Chai spent the next ten months hiding and on the run until she escaped to Hong Kong, from which she proceeded to Paris, France. She eventually accepted a full scholarship to Princeton University, which led her to settling in the United States. [21]

Later career[edit]

After arriving in the United States, Chai Ling continued her education by obtaining an MPA in public affairs and international relations from Princeton University, and an MBA from Harvard Business School. [22] She then moved on to become an U.S.-based Internet entrepreneur. In 1998, Chai founded Jenzabar, an Internet system that allows students to communicate amongst themselves and their teachers, and keep track of what is going on in the news and on campus. [23] Their mission is to “support education by enabling institutions of higher education to thrive, grow, and achieve student success.” [24] She also co-founded The Jenzabar Foundation, which provides grant opportunities for humanitarian efforts by student leaders. [25]

In 2010, Chai founded All Girls Allowed, a non-profit organization that aims to stop human rights violations in China that are related to the One-Child Policy. [26] Their policy states that “Through exposing the injustice of China’s One-Child Policy, rescuing girls and mothers from gendercide in society, and celebrating women by embracing them as equal image-bearers of God, Chai hopes to restore life, value, and dignity to women.” [27]

In 2011, Tyndale Publishers released A Heart for Freedom: The Remarkable Journey of a Young Dissident, her Daring Escape, and her Quest to Free China's Daughters. [28] This memoir written by Chai, details her early life before the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, her involvement as a key student leader and commander-in-chief, and her life afterwards as a dissident and finding God.

Chai has been called to testify before Congress 8 times, most recently on Jun 3, 2013. Her testimony has mainly related to Human Rights Issues in China.[29]


Controversies[edit]

Documentary controversy

In a documentary titled The Gate of Heavenly Peace, footage from May 28, 1989 shows viewers parts of an interview between Chai and reporter Philip Cunningham. The footage insinuates that Chai claimed that the student leaders were intentionally putting the students’ lives at risk in order to further their own interests. Chai argues that the documentary suggests she “exposed her student followers to bloodshed and death” and “minimized the fact that she stayed until the last hour.” [30] Chai, claims that she had been misquoted and that the footage used "selective quotes and interpretive and erroneous translation,” [31] and in reality the student leaders, including herself, had remained united and at the square until the very last hours of the protest [32]

Chai and her firm have launched multiple lawsuits against the non-profit organization that created this film. An initial suit, in which Chai alleged defamation, has been dismissed. An additional suit claims that the organization infringed upon Jenzabar's trademark by mentioning the firm's name in the keyword meta tags and title tag for a page about Jenzabar on its website.[33] Her lawsuits have been criticized by some commentators, including columnists for the Boston Globe and the New Yorker.[34][35] [36][37] In the end, Chai has lost all the lawsuit cases in the Massachusetts appeals court.[38][39]

"Insufficiently Religious" discrimination lawsuit against Jenzabar, All Girls Allowed and Chai Ling

Jing Zhang and Women's Rights in China sued Jenzabar Inc., The Jenzabar Foundation, All Girls Allowed and their founder and Jing's former employer, Chai Ling. [40]

Jing Zhang, is a Chinese activist who once spent five years in a Chinese prison for promoting freedom and democracy. In the United States, Zhang had established her own nonprofit, Women’s Rights in China, when she joined forces with Chai to develop programs to prevent forced abortions in China. Then, she alleges, Chai fired her for being insufficiently religious and for declining to engage in “weekly corporate worship.” [41]

References[edit]

  1. ^ All Girls Allowed, accessed March 19, 2014. http://www.allgirlsallowed.org/about/chai-ling
  2. ^ A Heart for Freedom Website, accessed March 19, 2014. http://aheartforfreedom.com/index.php/the-book/
  3. ^ All Girls Allowed, accessed March 19, 2014. http://www.allgirlsallowed.org/about/chai-ling
  4. ^ All Girls Allowed, accessed March 19, 2014. http://www.allgirlsallowed.org/about/chai-ling
  5. ^ Gevirtz, L. (1999, Jun 01). Dissident now internet entrepreneur. National Post. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.proxy.lib.sfu.ca/docview/329422516?accountid=13800
  6. ^ Ling Chai, A Heart for Freedom. Carol Stream, Illinois: Tyndale House, 2011 IBSN 978-1-4143-6246-5. P.7.
  7. ^ Ling Chai, A Heart for Freedom. Carol Stream, Illinois: Tyndale House, 2011 IBSN 978-1-4143-6246-5. P.11.
  8. ^ Ling Chai, A Heart for Freedom. Carol Stream, Illinois: Tyndale House, 2011 IBSN 978-1-4143-6246-5. P 11.
  9. ^ Ling Chai, A Heart for Freedom. Carol Stream, Illinois: Tyndale House, 2011 IBSN 978-1-4143-6246-5. P.3.
  10. ^ Ling Chai, A Heart for Freedom. Carol Stream, Illinois: Tyndale House, 2011 IBSN 978-1-4143-6246-5. P.15.
  11. ^ Ling Chai, A Heart for Freedom. Carol Stream, Illinois: Tyndale House, 2011 IBSN 978-1-4143-6246-5. P.235.
  12. ^ Ling Chai, A Heart for Freedom. Carol Stream, Illinois: Tyndale House, 2011 IBSN 978-1-4143-6246-5. P.268.
  13. ^ Outside of the Box, Robert A. Maginn: A learning environment, accessed March 22, 2014. http://www.bizjournals.com/boston/stories/2009/03/16/story14.html?page=all
  14. ^ Outside of the Box, Robert A. Maginn: A learning environment, accessed March 22, 2014. http://www.bizjournals.com/boston/stories/2009/03/16/story14.html?page=all
  15. ^ ChinaAid, Tiananmen Square Leader Chai Ling Embraces Christian Faith and Freedom, accessed March 19, 2014. http://www.chinaaid.org/2010/04/tiananmen-square-leader-chai-ling.html
  16. ^ All Girls Allowed, accessed March 19, 2014. http://www.allgirlsallowed.org/about/chai-ling
  17. ^ ChinaAid, Tiananmen Square Leader Chai Ling Embraces Christian Faith and Freedom, accessed March 19, 2014. http://www.chinaaid.org/2010/04/tiananmen-square-leader-chai-ling.html
  18. ^ Andrew Lui (2000) Looking Back at Tiananmen Square, Peace Review: A Journal of Social Justice, 12:1, 139-145, DOI: 10.1080/104026500113935
  19. ^ Ling Chai, A Heart for Freedom. Carol Stream, Illinois: Tyndale House, 2011 IBSN 978-1-4143-6246-5. P.129.
  20. ^ All Girls Allowed, accessed March 19, 2014. http://www.allgirlsallowed.org/about/chai-ling
  21. ^ All Girls Allowed, accessed March 19, 2014. http://www.allgirlsallowed.org/about/chai-ling
  22. ^ All Girls Allowed, accessed March 19, 2014. http://www.allgirlsallowed.org/about/chai-ling
  23. ^ Jenzabar, accessed March 21, 2014. http://www.jenzabar.com/about-us/mission
  24. ^ Jenzabar, accessed March 21, 2014. http://www.jenzabar.com/about-us/mission
  25. ^ Jenzabar Foundation, accessed March 22, 2014. http://jenzabarfoundation.org/
  26. ^ All Girls Allowed, accessed March 19, 2014. http://www.allgirlsallowed.org/about/chai-ling
  27. ^ All Girls Allowed, accessed March 19, 2014. http://www.allgirlsallowed.org/about/chai-ling
  28. ^ Ling Chai, A Heart for Freedom. Carol Stream, Illinois: Tyndale House, 2011 IBSN 978-1-4143-6246-5.
  29. ^ "Biographical History of Ling Chai". c-span.com. Retrieved July 11, 2013. 
  30. ^ Ling Chai, A Heart for Freedom. Carol Stream, Illinois: Tyndale House, 2011 IBSN 978-1-4143-6246-5. P.178.
  31. ^ Wang Dan, Defense for Chai Ling, accessed March 22, 2014. http://www.64memo.com/d/Default.aspx?tabid=97
  32. ^ Wang Dan, Defense for Chai Ling, accessed March 22, 2014. http://www.64memo.com/d/Default.aspx?tabid=97
  33. ^ MacArtney, Jane (May 4, 2009). "Tiananmen activist Chai Ling sues makers of film about 1989 protest". The Times (London). Retrieved April 28, 2010. 
  34. ^ Abraham, Yvonne (June 7, 2009). "Beijing lesson unlearned". The Boston Globe. 
  35. ^ Letter from China: The American Dream: The Lawsuit: The New Yorker
  36. ^ Chai Ling: Speech-Squelching Narcissistic Megalomaniac B*tch!
  37. ^ Jenzabar Continues To Try To Censor Criticism Via Trademark Bullying
  38. ^ http://www.citmedialaw.org/blog/2012/dmlp-victory-mass-appeals-court-finds-no-trademark-infringement-critical-website
  39. ^ http://www.socialaw.com/slippf.htm?cid=21662&sid=119
  40. ^ http://www.courthousenews.com/2012/06/19/47589.htm
  41. ^ http://articles.boston.com/2012-07-01/metro/32486299_1_chinese-rights-activist-religious-discrimination-eternal-life

External links[edit]