Color symbolism

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Color symbolism in art and anthropology refers to the use of color as a symbol in various cultures. There is great diversity in the use of colors and their associations between cultures[1] and even within the same culture in different time periods.[2] In fact, the same color may have very different associations within the same culture at any time. For example, red is often used for stop signs[3] or danger.[4] At the same time, red is also frequently used in association with romance, e.g. with Valentine's Day.[5] White variously signifies purity, innocence, wisdom or death. Blue has similarly diverse meanings.

Symbolic representations of religious concepts or articles may include a specific color with which the concept or object is associated.[6] There is evidence to suggest that colors have been used for this purpose as early as 90,000 BC.[7]

Extensive associations for each color are listed in their respective articles.

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitfield TW, Wiltshire TJ. (Nov 1990). "Color psychology: a critical review". Genet Soc Gen Psychol Monogr 4 (116): 385–411. 
  2. ^ http://books.google.com/books?id=utSjRYHEJ90C&printsec=frontcover&dq=Color+Psychology&source=bl&ots=xn8fzE-kSm&sig=1YNsZd8UakLSU18gvigMxj7LzX4&hl=en&ei=DaF6S-KPF5D7nAeR5KzICQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=6&ved=0CBoQ6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q=&f=false
  3. ^ http://mutcd.fhwa.dot.gov/SHSm/regulatory.pdf
  4. ^ File:Zeichen 101.svg
  5. ^ http://images.google.com/images?q=valentine
  6. ^ "religious symbolism and iconography." Encyclopædia Britannica. 2010. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. 17 February 2010 <http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/497416/religious-symbolism>.
  7. ^ Hovers, E.; Ilani, S.; Bar‐yosef, O.; Vandermeersch, B. (2003). "An Early Case of Color Symbolism: Ochre Use by Modern Humans in Qafzeh Cave". Current Anthropology 44 (4): 491. doi:10.1086/375869.  edit

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