Dolphin (emulator)

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Dolphin
Dolphin-logo.svg
Dolphin Emulator 4.0.png
Dolphin Emulator
Original author(s) F|RES, ector
Developer(s) Dolphin Team
Initial release 2003
Stable release 4.0.2 / November 30, 2013; 4 months ago (2013-11-30)[1]
Written in C++, C, Assembly
Operating system Windows XP+, OS X 10.7+, GNU/Linux, FreeBSD, Android
Platform IA-32 or x64 with SSE2
ARM
Size 4.6 MiB: Windows, x86
5.2 MiB: Windows, x86-64
14.3 MiB: OS X
5.61 MiB: Android
Type Video game console emulator
License GNU General Public License version 2 (only)
Website Official website

Dolphin is a free and open-source emulator of Nintendo GameCube, Wii and Triforce that runs on Microsoft Windows, OS X, GNU/Linux, and Android.[2][3][4] It was the first emulator to successfully run commercial Nintendo GameCube and Wii games, and is the only emulator capable of running commercial Wii games. Its name refers to the development codename for the GameCube.[5]

Development[edit]

Origins (2003–2007)[edit]

Dolphin was first released in 2003 as an experimental Nintendo GameCube emulator that could boot up and run commercial games. Audio was not yet emulated, and there were performance issues. Many games crashed on start up or barely ran at all; average speed was from 2 to 20 FPS.

Dolphin was officially discontinued in 2004, with the developers releasing version 1.01 as the final version of the emulator. The developers decided to revive the project in 2005 and then in 2007 version 1.03 was released with minor improvements and basic sound support.

Open source and Wii emulation (2008–present)[edit]

Dolphin became an open-source project on July 13, 2008 when the developers released the source code publicly on a SVN repository on Google Code under the GPLv2. At this point, the emulator even had basic Wii emulation implemented. Upon its open sourcing, various developers were attracted, and development on the emulator has been continuous since, with regular releases of SVN builds. These preview builds and unofficial SVN builds were released with their revision number (e.g., RXXXX) rather than version numbers (e.g., 1.03). As with previous builds, differences between consecutive builds are typically minor.[6]

Dolphin's Wii emulation reached a milestone in February 2009 when it made a breakthrough, managing to successfully boot and run the official Wii System Menu v1.0. Shortly after, all versions of the Wii OS became bootable.[citation needed] There is no full support for Wii channels, which must be launched through the main Dolphin interface.

By April 2009, most commercial games, GameCube and Wii alike, could be fully played albeit with a few minor problems and errors, with a large number of games running with virtually no defect. Improvements to the emulator had allowed users to play select games at full speed for the first time, audio had dramatically improved, and the graphics capabilities were fairly consistent except for a few minor problems.[7]

By late October 2009, numerous new useful features were incorporated into the emulator such as automatic frame-skipping, which increased the performance of the emulator as well as increased stability of the emulator overall. Also improved was the NetPlay feature of the emulator, which allowed players to play multiplayer GameCube and Wii games online with friends, as long as the game does not require a Wii remote. The GUI was reworked to make it more user-friendly. The DirectX plug-in also received huge developments, and is now often faster than the OpenGL plug-in.

By the end of November 2010, the developers fixed most of the sound issues (such as crackling), added compatibility with even more games, and increased the overall emulation speed and accuracy.

In July 2011, version 3.0 was released and the emulator reached its final stages of development. There was roughly 2500 code commits between 2.0 and 3.0. Strange User Interface behavior, crashes, graphical glitches and other problems were fixed. For example, many games which did not boot at all in Dolphin, now work. The configuration dialogs were restructured in a more sensible manner to ease Dolphin usage for new users. The video configuration dialog received a complete overhaul and features a description panel for each option. Various features were added including support for the Wiimote speaker, EFB format change emulation, graphics debugger, audio dumping, and many others. Because of numerous fixes to the LLE emulator engine, audio emulation in Dolphin is close to perfect now (provided that one has the necessary DSP dumps). The developers also added a Direct3D 11 video backend and an XAudio2 audio backend. The 2.0 release already had seen the introduction of plugin rewrites; the new plugins have been brought to feature parity and were replaced so well, that it was decided to merge all plugins into the Core. Further improvements are better suited as additions in the current infrastructure since this architecture allows for a much better integration with the other parts of Dolphin. A set of eight translations (Arabic, Brazilian Portuguese, French, Greek, Hungarian, Portuguese, Spanish, Turkish) is also included with Dolphin 3.0. There have been some performance optimizations (especially in the texture decoder), but generally speaking, performance decreased in favor of more accurate hardware emulation.

Dolphin running Super Smash Bros. Brawl.

On December 25, 2012 version 3.5 was released, featuring improved accessory support, a FreeBSD port, and emulation fixes.[8]

On April 6, 2013, the emulator team released the first builds for Google's Android mobile operating system. As of September 2013, only a handful of devices have the hardware to support OpenGL ES 3.0, with Google officially supporting the standard in software since July 2013 with the introduction of Android 4.3 Jelly Bean. Games run at an average of 1 FPS. The developer has cited the Samsung Galaxy S4 as one of the first phones capable of playing games at higher speeds, but even it will have considerable speed limitations.[9]

On September 22, 2013, version 4.0 was released, featuring backend improvements to OpenGL rendering and OpenAL audio, broader controller support, networking enhancements, and performance tweaks for OS X and Linux builds.[10][11] However, some critical bugs slipped through the release, leading to bugfix releases 4.0.1[12] and 4.0.2.[1]

Features[edit]

System requirements
Minimum Recommended
Microsoft Windows[2][13][14]
Operating system Windows XP or higher Windows 7 x64
CPU SSE2 support Modern quad-core CPU. Intel i5-2500K or higher.
Memory 2 GB RAM or more.
Graphics hardware Pixel Shader 3.0, and DirectX 10 or OpenGL 3 support Modern DirectX 11 GPU.
OS X
Operating system OS X Lion 10.7 or higher.
Graphics hardware Pixel Shader 4.0 and OpenGL 3 support.
Linux
Operating system Any up-to-date Linux distro.
Android
Operating system Android 4.x
CPU ARMv7 with NEON
Memory 1 GB RAM 2 GB RAM
Graphics hardware OpenGL ES 3 support

Development builds of Dolphin offer new enhancements, fixes, and experimental features which may be incorporated into future versions of Dolphin.

Controller[edit]

  • Real Wii Remote support over bluetooth (a real MotionPlus can be used for games that require it)
  • Wii Remote expansions support (MotionPlus adapter, Nunchuk, Classic controller, Guitar, Drums, Turntable)
  • Support for multiple controllers with DirectInput or XInput support for emulated GameCube controllers and Wii Remotes with or without expansions (unofficial builds are available that emulate MotionPlus for games that require it)
  • Jailbroken iOS devices can be used as emulated Wii Remotes through iController[15]

Networking[edit]

Graphical improvements[edit]

Like many other PC emulators, Dolphin supports arbitrary resolutions, whereas the GameCube and Wii only support up to 480p.[7] The ability for high resolution graphics has been widely lauded by the gaming community and has received features on numerous gaming networks, as the emulator has surpassed the limits of the original console.[17]

Emulated software features[edit]

  • Ability to skip Wii Menu or GameCube BIOS when starting a game
  • Ability to start a region-locked game from any region
  • NAND emulation
  • WAD (downloadable games) support (mostly used for WiiWare, Virtual Console, etc.)
  • Support for Homebrew and XFB emulation

Other features[edit]

Reception[edit]

Dolphin has received widespread critical acclaim from various independent gaming sites. Eurogamer and 1UP.com commended the ability to play games in high-definition.[18][19] It has also been praised for the high compatibility across both the Gamecube and the Wii, in addition to the Triforce arcade board. It has also received the attention of many websites due to it being the first emulator to properly emulate a seventh generation console.[20]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Official Dolphin Emulator Website - Dolphin 4.0.2 Release Announcement". Dolphin-emu.org. Retrieved 2013-11-30. 
  2. ^ a b "Dolphin FAQ". Dolphin-emu.org. Retrieved 25 November 2012. 
  3. ^ "Linux_Build". 2012-12-11. Retrieved 2012-12-22. 
  4. ^ "Dolphin Emulator". Google Play. Retrieved 2013-09-22. 
  5. ^ "Say Hello to Project Dolphin". IGN. 1999-05-04. Retrieved 2008-01-27. 
  6. ^ "Changes - dolphin-emu". Dolphin Team. Retrieved 28 July 2009. 
  7. ^ a b "Super Smash Bros. Brawl on Dolphin the Wii Emulator (720p HD) – News". renebarahona. YouTube. March 18, 2009. Retrieved 28 July 2009. 
  8. ^ "Dolphin 3.5 Release Announcement". Forums.dolphin-emu.org. Retrieved 2013-09-22. 
  9. ^ "Donations for Dolphin Android Development". Dolphin Team. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  10. ^ a b "Official Dolphin Emulator Website - Dolphin 4.0 Release Announcement". Dolphin-emu.org. Retrieved 2013-09-22. 
  11. ^ "Dolphin Emulator 4.0 Released For GameCube, Wii". Phoronix. Retrieved 2013-09-23. 
  12. ^ "Official Dolphin Emulator Website - Dolphin 4.0.1 Release Announcement". Dolphin-emu.org. Retrieved 2013-10-21. 
  13. ^ "Dolphin Manual - Dolphin Emulator Wiki". Wiki.dolphin-emu.org. Retrieved 2013-09-22. 
  14. ^ "Dolphin_Emulator_Manual.pdf - Google Drive". Docs.google.com. Retrieved 2013-09-22. 
  15. ^ "[PATCH] UDPWii: Use iPhone as WiiMote [NEW: Nunchuck and IR support]". Forums.dolphin-emu.org. Retrieved 2012-11-25. 
  16. ^ "Official Dolphin Emulator Website - Wii Network Guide". Dolphin-emu.org. Retrieved 2013-09-22. 
  17. ^ "How Your Wii Games Would Look In 720p - Wii - Kotaku - News". Luke Plunkett. Kotaku. March 27, 2009. Retrieved 28 July 2009. 
  18. ^ Purchese, Robert (2009-07-06). "Wii emulator runs Mario Galaxy in 720p News • News • Wii •". Eurogamer.net. Retrieved 2012-11-25. 
  19. ^ Pereira, Chris. "See What Super Mario Galaxy Looks Like in 720p". 1up.com. Retrieved 2012-11-25. 
  20. ^ Zackheim, Ben (2004-12-21). "Dolphin emulator final build available". Joystiq. Retrieved 2012-11-25. 

External links[edit]