Dorothy Cotton

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Dorothy Cotton (born 1930) was a leader of the 1960s African-American Civil Rights Movement[1] and a member of the inner-circle of one of its main organizations, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). As the SCLC's Educational Director, she was arguably the highest ranked female member of the organization.

Cotton helped James Bevel organize the students during the 1963 Birmingham Movement and its Children's Crusade, and conducted citizenship classes throughout the South during the era. She also accompanied Martin Luther King, Jr., the co-founder and first president of the SCLC, on his trip to Oslo, Norway to receive the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize.

An in-depth interview with Dorothy Cotton was done by the Oral Histories of the Civil Rights History Project, conducted through the University of North Carolina.[2]

Cotton currently resides in Ithaca, New York.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Seeger, Pete; Reiser, Bob (1989). Everybody says freedom. W. W. Norton & Company. pp. 119–. ISBN 978-0-393-30604-0. Retrieved 2 August 2011. 
  2. ^ Oral Histories, Civil Rights History Project: Dorothy Cotton, Civil Rights Activist, UNC Chapel Hill, 7/25/2011.