Seventy (LDS Church)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from First Quorum of the Seventy)
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is about the priesthood office of Seventy within The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. For usages of the term Seventy within the Latter Day Saints movement, see Seventy (Latter Day Saints).

Seventy is a priesthood office in the Melchizedek priesthood of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). Traditionally, a Latter-day Saint holding this priesthood office is a "traveling minister"[1] and an "especial witness"[2] of Jesus Christ, charged with the mission of preaching the gospel to the entire world under the direction of the Twelve Apostles.[3] Latter-day Saints teach that the office of seventy was anciently conferred upon the seventy disciples mentioned in the Gospel of Luke 10:1-2. Multiple individuals holding the office of seventy are referred to collectively as seventies.

History of the seventy in Latter Day Saint movement[edit]

Place in Latter Day Saint hierarchy[edit]

In practical terms, the priesthood office of seventy is one which has varied widely over the course of history. As originally envisioned by Latter Day Saint movement founder Joseph Smith, Jr. in the 1830s, the seventy were to be a body composed of several separate quorums of up to 70 seventies each, all of which would be led by seven presidents. These presidents, chosen from the first quorum, would appoint and direct the other quorums of seventy.[4]

As introduced by Joseph Smith, the apostles and the seventy had authority only outside the main body of Latter Day Saints in Zion, and in the outlying stakes. Members in Zion and the stakes were led by the High Council of Zion (under the direction of the First Presidency) and stake high councils.

Early Latter Day Saint quorums of seventy[edit]

Historically, the First Quorum of the Seventy came into being in 1835 when seven men were set apart as the First Seven Presidents of the Seventy.

In 1837, six of the seven presidents were released because it was discovered that they had previously been ordained high priests. Five of these men were ultimately replaced by others. The other two—Levi W. Hancock and Joseph Young—remained members of the First Seven Presidents for the rest of their lives.[5]

History of the seventy in the LDS Church[edit]

In the LDS Church, the quorums of the seventy are directed and supervised hierarchically by the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, who are in turn directed by the First Presidency.

As a body, the seventy in the LDS Church are considered to be equal in priesthood authority with the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles.[6][7] This presumably means that if the apostles were killed or incapacitated, the seventy could take over the function of the apostles. However, in such circumstances, the seventy would be required to act unanimously.[4]

Structure and history of the seventy in the LDS Church[edit]

In the LDS Church, members of the First and the Second Quorums of the Seventy are general authorities of the church with responsibilities covering the church as a whole.

Members of additional Quorums of the Seventy (currently numbered Third through Eighth) are called an area seventy. Members of these quorums are ordained to the priesthood office of seventy, but they are not general authorities of the church. Area seventies generally have authority only within a geographical unit of the church called an area.

Expanding membership[edit]

By the time Joseph Smith was killed, he had already organized four incomplete quorums of seventy. By 1845, there were ten quorums of seventy. The seventies in the first quorum became the seven presidents for each of the other quorums; that is, there were 63 presidents, 7 for each of the 9 other quorums, and the seven remaining members were the presidency of the first quorum. The members of the first quorum were thus spread out across the church, making meetings of the first quorum rare.

Elders were often ordained to the office of seventy immediately before they left on a mission. Quorums were not restricted to geography, so individual quorums were scattered all over the world.

In 1883, church president John Taylor localized the quorums of seventy. Each stake was given a quorum of seventy, and seventies in that stake would belong to that quorum. Taylor also prescribed that the senior president of the first 64 quorums could meet with the seven presidents of the first quorum and that would constitute a meeting of the first quorum. This never happened, however.[8] This organization continued until church president Spencer W. Kimball's reorganization of the seventies in 1976.

Though the number of seventies in the church grew, the number of presidents remained at seven. In the 1930s, the First Seven Presidents were renamed the First Council of the Seventy.

Eventually, the stake quorums of seventy were no longer numbered and in 1936 they were put under the local responsibility of stake presidents. Subsequently, in 1961, church president David O. McKay ordained those of the First Council of the Seventy who wished to be high priests.[9]

First Quorum of the Seventy formed[edit]

In 1975, under the direction of church president Spencer W. Kimball, the First Quorum of the Seventy was reconstituted. The First Quorum was composed of the former members of the First Council of the Seventy as well as new individuals selected by Kimball. The reason for the change was that the growth of the church necessitated the call of more general authorities. In 1976, the First Council of the Seventy, the First Quorum of the Seventy, and the Assistants to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles were all merged into a new First Quorum of the Seventy under a seven-member Presidency of the Seventy.[10] In 1978, some of the older members of the seventy were "retired" as the first general authorities to be given emeritus status. However, members appointed through 1981 were still granted life tenure.

Discontinuance of local quorums of seventy[edit]

In 1986, all stake quorums of the seventy were discontinued. The church encouraged local leaders to have ordained seventies meet with the local elders quorum or to ordain them as high priests.[11]

Second Quorum of the Seventy formed[edit]

In 1984, some seventies were appointed to the First Quorum of the Seventy who were not to serve for life, but for terms of three to five years. In 1989, these limited-term members were separated into a new Second Quorum of the Seventy. At the same time, the general practice was instituted of retiring all members of the First Quorum at the October general conference following their 70th birthdays, or earlier in the case of serious health problems. Some flexibility on the terms of service has emerged in recent years.[12]

Since 1989, members of the First and Second Quorums have continued as general authorities of the church.[13] Sometimes members are called from the Second Quorum into the First Quorum.

Since the 1976 merger of First Quorum of the Seventy, seventies are the most usual candidates to become members of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. Since 1976, three have been called as apostles who did not serve as general authority seventies prior to their call: Russell M. Nelson, Dallin H. Oaks, and David A. Bednar,[14] Nelson and Oaks were ordained apostles in 1984 under church president Spencer W. Kimball and Bednar in 2004 under church president Gordon B. Hinckley.

Area seventies and additional quorums of seventy[edit]

At the church's April 1995 general conference, church president Gordon B. Hinckley announced the creation of a new leadership position known as the area authority.[15] The area authorities were to replace the regional representatives who had served as bridge of leadership between the general authorities and the local stake and mission presidents. In 1997, it was decided that area authorities would be ordained to the office of seventy. As a result, these area authorities were renamed area authority seventies, and the church announced that these new seventies would become members of the newly created Third, Fourth, and Fifth Quorums of the Seventy.[16] Later, the title "area authority seventy" was shortened to area seventy, which is the title currently in use.

Area seventies serve in the various geographic regions of the world called areas in which the church is governed by area presidencies. An international area presidency is typically composed of members of the First and Second Quorums of the Seventy, while areas in the United States and Canada are directed by a member of the Presidency of the Seventy.[17]

In 2004, the Fifth Quorum of the Seventy was divided to create the Sixth Quorum of the Seventy.[18]

In May 2005, the Seventh and Eighth Quorums of the Seventy were created. The Fourth Quorum, which had served Mexico, Central and South America had grown to 72 members, and was split into the Fourth and Seventh Quorums. The Eighth Quorum was created to allow better geographic organization of the Third Quorum (not because the number of members exceeded seventy). The Third Quorum previously covered all of Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe and the western islands of the Pacific. The new Eighth Quorum serves Southern Asia, Australia, and the western islands of the Pacific. The Third Quorum continued to serve Africa, northern Asia, and Europe.[19]

Seventies who became apostles or members of the First Presidency[edit]

Name Dates as
a seventy
Specific quorum or position as a seventy Dates in other position(s)
GeorgeAlbertSmith.jpg George A. Smith 1835–39 First Quorum of the Seventy Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (1839–68);
First Presidency (1868–75)
Amasamlyman.gif Amasa M. Lyman 1835–42 First Quorum of the Seventy Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (1842–43; 1844–67);
First Presidency (1843–44)
Erastussnow.jpg Erastus Snow 1836–49 Second Quorum of the Seventy Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (1849–88)
Wilford Woodruff 1889.jpg Wilford Woodruff 1837–38 First Quorum of the Seventy Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (1839–89);
President of the church (1889–98)
Lorenzosnow.jpg Lorenzo Snow 1840 None: was ordained a high priest the day after being ordained a seventy Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (1849–98);
First Presidency (1873–77);
President of the church (1898–1901)
Jedediahmgrant.gif Jedediah M. Grant 1845–54 First Council of the Seventy Apostle (1854–56); First Presidency (1854–56)
Abraham H. Cannon.jpg Abraham H. Cannon 1882–89 First Council of the Seventy Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (1889–96)
George Q. Morris2.jpg George Q. Morris 1889–1908 Stake seventy Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (1954–62)
Richard L. Evans.JPG Richard L. Evans 1938–53 First Council of the Seventy Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (1953–71)
Bruce R. McConkie2.jpg Bruce R. McConkie 1946–72 First Council of the Seventy Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (1972–85)
Neal A. Maxwell.jpg Neal A. Maxwell 1974–81 First Council of the Seventy (1974–76);
Presidency of the Seventy (1976–81)
Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (1981–2004)
James E. Faust2.jpg James E. Faust 1976–78 Presidency of the Seventy Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (1978–95);
First Presidency (1995–2007)
Alvin R. Dyer2.jpg Alvin R. Dyer 1976–77 First Quorum of the Seventy
(only person to be ordained a seventy after being ordained an apostle)
Apostle (1967–77); First Presidency (1968–70)
M. Russell Ballard 1976–85 First Quorum of the Seventy;
Presidency of the Seventy (1980–85)
Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (1985–)
Robert D. Hales 1976–85 First Quorum of the Seventy Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (1994–)
Joseph B. Wirthlin 1976–86 First Quorum of the Seventy;
Presidency of the Seventy (1986)
Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (1986–2008)
Richard G. Scott.JPG Richard G. Scott 1977–88 First Quorum of the Seventy;
Presidency of the Seventy (1983–88)
Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (1988–)
Jeffrey R. Holland2.jpg Jeffrey R. Holland 1989–94 First Quorum of the Seventy Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (1994–)
Henry B. Eyring.jpg Henry B. Eyring 1992–95 First Quorum of the Seventy Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (1995–2007);
First Presidency (2007–)
D. Todd Christofferson 1993–2008 First Quorum of the Seventy (1993–2008);
Presidency of the Seventy (1998–2008)
Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (2008–)
Neil L. Andersen4.jpg Neil L. Andersen 1993–2009 First Quorum of the Seventy (1993–2009);
Presidency of the Seventy (2005–09)
Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (2009–)
Dieter F. Uchtdorf3.jpg Dieter F. Uchtdorf 1994–2004 Second Quorum of the Seventy (1994–96);
First Quorum of the Seventy (1996–2004);
Presidency of the Seventy (2002–04)
Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (2004–08);
First Presidency (2008–)
Quentin L. Cook 1996–2007 Second Quorum of the Seventy (1996–98);
First Quorum of the Seventy (1998–2007);
Presidency of the Seventy (2007)
Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (2007–)
Elder Bednar.jpeg David A. Bednar 1997–2004 Area seventy; Fifth Quorum of the Seventy Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (2004–)

Other noteworthy seventies[edit]

Name Dates as a general,
area, or local Seventy[a]
Specific quorum or position as a seventy Significance
Elijah Abel.jpg Elijah Abel 1836–84 Local seventy First black seventy
Ángel Abrea 1981–2003[b] First Quorum of the Seventy (1981–2003);
Emeritus general authority (2003–)
First resident of Latin America general authority
Joseph Anderson 1976–78 First Quorum of the Seventy (1976–78);
Emeritus general authority (1978–92)
Second oldest-lived general authority in LDS Church history (102)
Merrill J. Bateman 1992–94; 1995–2007[b] Second Quorum of the Seventy (1992–94);
First Quorum of the Seventy (1995–2007);
Presidency of the Seventy (2003–07);
Emeritus general authority (2007–)
Presiding Bishop of the church (1994–95);
President of Brigham Young University (1996–2003)
Samuel O. Bennion.jpg Samuel O. Bennion 1933–46 First Council of the Seventy
Gladden Bishop c. 1837–42 Local seventy Abandoned the church in 1842 and established his own Latter Day Saint sect after 1844
Clayton Christensen World Economic Forum 2013.jpg Clayton M. Christensen Area Seventy; Sixth Quorum of the Seventy Professor at Harvard Business School
Kim B. Clark PR photo.jpeg Kim B. Clark 2007–14 Area Seventy; Fifth Quorum of the Seventy President of Brigham Young University–Idaho (2007–);
Former dean of Harvard Business School
John Van Cott 1846.jpg John Van Cott 1847–83 Local seventy (1847–62);
First Council of the Seventy (1862–83)
Missionary to Scandinavia
Charles A. Didier 1975–2009[b] First Quorum of the Seventy;
Presidency of the Seventy (1992–95; 2001–07);
Emeritus general authority (2009-)
First resident of Europe general authority
Edward Dube 2013– First Quorum of the Seventy (2013-) First Zimbabwean and second black African general authority
Paul H. Dunn.jpg Paul H. Dunn 1964–89 First Council of the Seventy (1968–76);
First Quorum of the Seventy (1964–89);
Presidency of the Seventy (1976–80);
Emeritus general authority (1989–98)
in 1991, publicly admitted to falsifying and embellishing stories of personal experiences in past sermons and books
John H. Groberg 1976–2005[b] First Quorum of the Seventy (1976–2005);
Presidency of the Seventy (2004–05);
Emeritus general authority (2005–)
2001 film The Other Side of Heaven is based on his missionary experiences in Tonga
Zenas H. Gurley, Sr.jpg Zenas H. Gurley c. 1840–44 Local seventy Led a group of dissenters after 1844 and in 1853 became an apostle in the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
Han In Sang 1991–96 Second Quorum of the Seventy (1991–96) First Korean general authority
Milton R. Hunter.jpg Milton R. Hunter 1945–75 First Council of the Seventy co-author of Ancient America and the Book of Mormon
Jon Huntsman Sr 2004 Huntsman Award Ceremony.jpg Jon Huntsman, Sr. 1996–2011 Area Seventy; Fifth Quorum of the Seventy American businessman and philanthropist
Yoshihiko Kikuchi 1977–2011[b] First Quorum of the Seventy
Emeritus general authority (2011–)
First resident of Asia general authority
W. Rolfe Kerr.jpg W. Rolfe Kerr 1996–2007[b] Second Quorum of the Seventy (1996–97);
First Quorum of the Seventy (1997–2007);
Emeritus general authority (2007–)
Commissioner of Church Education (2005–08)
J. Golden Kimball.jpg J. Golden Kimball 1892–1938 First Council of the Seventy Legendary general authority wit
Adney Y. Komatsu 1976–93[b] First Quorum of the Seventy (1976–93);
Emeritus general authority (1993–)
First general authority of Asian descent
George P. Lee 1975–89 First Quorum of the Seventy First Native American general authority;
most recent general authority to be excommunicated
Augusto A. Lim 1992–97 Second Quorum of the Seventy (1992–97) First Filipino general authority
Gerald N. Lund 2002–08 Second Quorum of the Seventy Author of The Work and the Glory novels
J.W. Marriott, Jr. 1997–2011 Area Seventy; Sixth Quorum of the Seventy American hotelier and businessman
Helvécio Martins 1990–2005 Second Quorum of the Seventy (1990–95) First general authority of black African descent
Hugo E. Martinez 2009– Area Seventy (2009–14); Second Quorum of the Seventy (2014–) First Caribbean general authority and first Puerto Rican general authority
A. Roger Merrill (?–2004) Area Seventy General President of the Sunday School (2004–09)
James O. Mason.jpg James O. Mason 1994–2000 Second Quorum of the Seventy (1994–2000) Acting Surgeon General of the United States from 1989 to 1990
Joseph White Musser 1892–1921 Local seventy Early leader in the Mormon fundamentalist movement after being excommunicated in 1921
RobertOaks.jpg Robert C. Oaks 2000–09 Second Quorum of the Seventy;
Presidency of the Seventy (2004–07)
Former commander of Air Training Command and United States Air Forces in Europe
Warren Parrish 1835–37 First Quorum of the Seventy Scribe for Joseph Smith; apostatized in 1837
Rafael E. Pino 2008– First Quorum of the Seventy The first Venezuelan general authority.
Zera Pulsipher.jpg Zera Pulsipher 1838–62 First Council of the Seventy A missionary who preached to Wilford Woodruff;
excommunicated in 1862; rebaptized the same year
George Reynolds (LDS).JPG George Reynolds 1866–1909 Local seventy (1866–90);
First Council of the Seventy (1890–1909)
Secretary to the First Presidency; party to U.S. Supreme Court polygamy case Reynolds v. United States
Brigham Henry Roberts2.jpg B. H. Roberts 1877–1933 Local seventy (1877–88);
First Council of the Seventy (1888–1933)
Prominent Mormon historian and apologist
CecilSamuelson.JPG Cecil O. Samuelson 1994–2011[b] First Quorum of the Seventy;
Presidency of the Seventy (2001–03)
Emeritus general authority (2011–)
President of Brigham Young University (2003–14)
Joseph W. Sitati 2004– Area seventy (2004–09);
First Quorum of the Seventy (2009–)
First black African general authority of the church; second general authority of black African descent[20]
Edward Stevenson.jpg Edward Stevenson 1847–97 Local seventy (1847–94);
First Council of the Seventy (1894–97)
Widely-traveled Mormon missionary
WmWhitTaylor.JPG William W. Taylor 1875–84 Local seventy (1875–80);
First Council of the Seventy (1880–84)
Son of John Taylor; Mormon politician
Jose A. Teixeira 1997– Area seventy (1997–2005);
First Quorum of the Seventy (2008–)
First Portuguese general authority
Earl C. Tingey 1990–2008 First Quorum of the Seventy;
Presidency of the Seventy (1996–2008)
Senior member of the Presidency of the Seventy (2001–08)
Benjamin Winchester 1835–44 First Quorum of the Seventy Editor of first independent Mormon periodical; became a Rigdonite apostle after 1844; ultimately repudiated Mormonism
Richard B. Wirthlin 1996–2001 Second Quorum of the Seventy (1996–2001)
Chief strategist and pollster for Ronald Reagan
Kevin J Worthen 2010– Area Seventy President of Brigham Young University (2014–)
Joseph Young.jpg Joseph Young 1835–81 First Council of the Seventy Senior and Presiding President of the Seventy from 1835 to 1881 (a position subsequently held by his son Seymour B. Young, grandson Levi E. Young, and great-grandson S. Dilworth Young)
  1. ^ Members called to the seventy continue to hold the priesthood office of seventy after being released from a specific quorum or position. Time as an emeritus general authority not included in this date range.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Released, but retains general authority emeritus status.

Current organization[edit]

As of 2008, the Quorums of the Seventy are organized into eight quorums with a presidency of seven. The seventy act as emissaries of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and First Presidency of the church in organizing, training, proselytizing, and administering to millions of people scattered all across the globe. The seventy are the layer between local church administration and general church administration.

In general, seventies must first be at least elders in the Melchizedek priesthood, but in practice most have previously been ordained to the office of high priest. Seventies, being equal in authority, act under the direction of the First Presidency and the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles as they labor in their apostolic ministry.[21] Members of the LDS Church understand that being “equal in authority” (D&C 107:26) means they preside over the church when the First Presidency and the Quorum of the Twelve are not constituted.[22]

This means that the seventies have the power to do anything required to organize and administer the church, as long as they do so under the direction of the First Presidency or the Quorum of the Twelve (D&C 107:33–34). They do not, as quorums, preside over the church by their own authority unless the First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve are no longer in existence. Apart from the seven presidents of the seventy, seventies do not hold priesthood keys but are delegated the necessary keys to perform their duties. Seventies hold apostolic authority in the sense of being “especial witnesses of Christ.”[21] and the Quorums of the Seventy may become the presiding authority over the church if the First Presidency and the Quorum of the Twelve cease to exist.

Presidency of the Seventy[edit]

Historically, seven members of the First Quorum of the Seventy were called to serve as the Presidency of the Seventy. This precedent was broken, however, when in 2004 Robert C. Oaks of the Second Quorum of the Seventy was sustained to the Presidency to fill the vacancy created by Dieter F. Uchtdorf's call to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. The church now states that the seven presidents are drawn from the “members of the First or Second Quorum of the Seventy.”[23]

Historically, members of the Presidency of the Seventy would often serve as heads of various church ecclesiastical departments. This practice changed in 2004, when area presidencies in the United States and Canada were dissolved; these areas were put directly under the jurisdiction of the Presidency of the Seventy.[24] The management of these areas is currently the primary responsibility of the Presidency of the Seventy.

The Presidency of the Seventy is unique in the church in that not only are there seven members but all seven hold the priesthood "keys" of presidency.[25] The man with the longest tenure of uninterrupted service in the presidency is called to preside over the other six as the presiding president or senior president of the seventy.

The current Presidency of the Seventy and their areas of responsibility (as of April 2014) are:

Assists in all Areas
Utah North, Utah Salt Lake City, Utah South Areas[28]
North America Northeast Area[30]
North America Northwest and North America West Areas
Idaho and North America Central Areas[30]
North America Southeast Area[32]
North America Southwest Area

First Quorum of the Seventy[edit]

The First Quorum of the Seventy are general authorities, meaning they have authority throughout the church. They usually serve until their 70th birthday or until their health fails them, at which time they are given emeritus status and released from active service as a general authority.[23]

Members of the First Quorum of the Seventy serve under the direction of the Quorum of the Twelve and the Presidency of the Seventy. They do not generally visit local units of the church, teach or give sermons in church meetings except when given specific assignment. Often, members of this quorum will accompany the Twelve on their visits to missions and stakes throughout the church. Other times, they will be sent to act in behalf of the Quorum of the Twelve to stake conferences and to provide training and support to stakes, missions, areas, and temples. As general authorities, members of the First Quorum are often asked to speak at church general conferences.

Emeritus general authorities[edit]

Although no longer fully functioning general authorities, emeritus general authorities may be asked to be temple presidents or mission presidents. With the exception of Eldred G. Smith (Patriarch to the Church) and three other men (who were formerly in the Presiding Bishopric) all emeritus general authorities in church history have served as members of the First Quorum of the Seventy. They remain general authorities until their deaths, but an emeritus general authority is not a member of a seventies quorum. John K. Carmack, the former head of the Perpetual Education Fund and W. Rolfe Kerr, a former Church Commissioner of Education, are both emeritus general authorities. Jacob de Jager served as a bishop after he was given emeritus status. In the general conference meeting in which Ezra Taft Benson was first sustained as president of the church, the emeritus general authorities were sustained.[34] However, when Howard W. Hunter was sustained as president of the church the emeritus general authorities were not mentioned in the list of church officials that were sustained.[35]

Second Quorum of the Seventy[edit]

Members of the Second Quorum of the Seventy serve a similar role to that of the First Quorum. They are general authorities, which means they have authority throughout the church and are frequently asked to speak in general conference. They are called to serve for approximately five to six years.[23] Upon their release, they cease to be general authorities or members of the Second Quorum. However, they do retain the priesthood office of seventy.

Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth Quorums of the Seventy[edit]

Members of the Third through Eighth Quorums of the Seventy are not general authorities, and generally maintain their non-religious vocations. Unlike apostles and members of the First and Second Quorums, they are not required to relocate to Salt Lake City in order to be close to church headquarters. Members of these quorums are area seventies. As assigned, they carry out the duties typically carried out by members of the First and Second Quorums of Seventy,[23] which include reorganizing and creating stakes, training stake presidencies, presiding at stake conferences, serving in area presidencies, touring missions, and training mission presidents. They serve in their callings for approximately six to ten years. Upon their release, they cease to be area seventies and members of a quorum of the seventy, but retain the priesthood office of seventy.

  • Third Quorum of the Seventy
The Third Quorum members live and serve in the Africa Southeast, Africa West, Europe, Europe East, and Middle East/Africa North areas of the church.
  • Fourth Quorum of the Seventy
The Fourth Quorum members live and serve in the Caribbean, Central America, Mexico and South America Northwest areas of the church.
  • Fifth Quorum of the Seventy
The Fifth Quorum members live and serve in the Idaho, North America Northwest, North America West, Utah North, Utah Salt Lake City, and Utah South areas of the church.
  • Sixth Quorum of the Seventy
The Sixth Quorum members live and serve in the North America Central, North America Northeast, North America Southeast, and North America Southwest areas of the church.
  • Seventh Quorum of the Seventy
Members of the Seventh Quorum live and serve in the Brazil and South America South areas of the church.
  • Eighth Quorum of the Seventy
The Eighth Quorum of the Seventy live and serve in the Asia, Asia North, Pacific, and Philippines areas of the church.

Sealing power[edit]

Members of the First and Second Quorums of Seventy receive the sealing power which authorizes them to seal husbands to wives, and children to their parents, in any of the church's temples. Members of the other quorums of seventy do not receive this as part of their calling.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Doctrine and Covenants, Section 107:97
  2. ^ The Doctrine and Covenants, Section 107:25
  3. ^ The Doctrine and Covenants, Section 107:34
  4. ^ a b The Doctrine and Covenants, Section 107:27
  5. ^ Hancock was originally one of the six who were removed, but he was reinstated when it was discovered that he in fact had not been ordained a high priest.
  6. ^ The Doctrine and Covenants, Section 107:26
  7. ^ Gordon B. Hinckley, “The Quorum of the First Presidency”, Ensign, December 2005, p. 47.
  8. ^ Parrish, Alan K. (1992), "Seventy: Overview", in Ludlow, Daniel H, Encyclopedia of Mormonism, New York: Macmillan Publishing, pp. 1300–1303, ISBN 0-02-879602-0, OCLC 24502140 
  9. ^ The then-presiding president Levi Edgar Young (1874–1963) did not.
  10. ^ Spencer W. Kimball, “The Reconstitution of the First Quorum of the Seventy”, Ensign, November 1976, p. 9.
  11. ^ "Stake Seventies Quorums Discontinued". Ensign: 97–98. November 1986. Retrieved 2009-09-23. 
  12. ^ Cowan 2011
  13. ^ Tingey 2009
  14. ^ Although Bednar was an Area Seventy at the time of his call (New authorities (9 October 2004). Church News published by Deseret News Publishing Company. Last accessed 14 April 2009).
  15. ^ Gordon B. Hinckley, “This Work Is Concerned with People”, Ensign, May 1995, p. 51.
  16. ^ Gordon B. Hinckley, “May We Be Faithful and True”, Ensign, May 1997, p. 4.
  17. ^ In some cases, an area seventy may be called as a counselor to an area president; by reverse exception, apostles Dallin H. Oaks, Jeffrey R. Holland, and L. Tom Perry have all recently served as area presidents.
  18. ^ “First Presidency Announces Creation of the Sixth Quorum of the Seventy”, Ensign, July 2004, p. 74.
  19. ^ “Seventh and Eighth Quorums of the Seventy Announced", Ensign, July 2005, p. 74.
  20. ^ Helvécio Martins, who was a general authority between 1990 and 1995, was the first general authority of black African descent. Martins was of Brazilian nationality.
  21. ^ a b "When they are ordained, members of the Seventy do receive apostolic authority to bear witness that Jesus is the Christ and to go forth in all the world as the Twelve may send them." Earl C. Tingey, "Area Authority Seventies: 'To Bear Record of My Name in All the World'", Liahona, October 2002, pp. 50–55.
  22. ^ “Likewise, the Seventy, who serve under the direction of the Twelve, would become equal in authority only in the event that the First Presidency and the Quorum of the Twelve were somehow destroyed.” Gordon B. Hinckley, "The Quorum of the First Presidency", Ensign, December 2005, pp. 46–50.
  23. ^ a b c d Earl C. Tingey, “The Quorums of the Seventy”, Liahona, August 2005, pp. 30–32.
  24. ^ “New Area Leadership Assignments”, Ensign, August 2004, pp. 76–77.
  25. ^ LDS Church, "Priesthood Keys", Handbook 2: Administering the Church (2010, Salt Lake City, Utah: LDS Church) § 2.1.1.
  26. ^ "Elder Andersen, Elder Rasband Called to the Presidency of the Seventy", Ensign, August 2005, p. 76.
  27. ^ "The Sustaining of Church Officers", General Conference address, 2008-04-05, retrieved 2008-05-06.
  28. ^ a b First Presidency announces changes, Church News, 2012-02-11.
  29. ^ "Elder Hallstrom called to Presidency of the Seventy", Church News.
  30. ^ a b "Area leadership assignments announced for 2012", Church News.
  31. ^ "Elder Craig C. Christensen called to the Presidency of the Seventy", Church News.
  32. ^ a b "Elder Soares called to Presidency of the Seventy", Church News.
  33. ^ "Leadership Change, New General Authorities and New Sunday School General Presidency Announced". 
  34. ^ "Solemn Assembly and Sustaining of Church Officers,” Ensign, May 1986, p. 73.
  35. ^ “The Solemn Assembly Sustaining of Church Officers,” Ensign, Nov 1994, p. 4.

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]