Hillsboro School District

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Hillsboro School District
Hillsboro School District logo.png
Type and location
Type Public
Grades K-12
Established 1851
Region Greater Hillsboro, Oregon
Country United States
Location Washington County
District information
Superintendent Mike Scott[1]
Budget $216 million
Students and staff
Students 20,375[2]
Teachers 1,105
Staff 1,089
Athletic Conference Northwest Oregon Conference
Other information
High Schools 4
Middle Schools 4
Elementary Schools 24
Website www.hsd.k12.or.us

The Hillsboro School District 1J is a unified school district located in Hillsboro, Oregon, United States. The district operates 26 elementary schools, four middle schools, and four high schools. Founded in 1851, the school district covers Hillsboro, Scholls, Reedville, North Plains, West Union, and other area communities. Total enrollment as of the 2007-2008 school year is 20,401 students, fourth largest in the state.[3]

The district is labeled 1J as the district absorbed the West Union School District, the first district in the county and the J (joint) represents that the district extends into other counties, Yamhill and Multnomah.[4][5] Hillsboro's elementary schools had been District 7 prior to consolidation in 1996.[4] The high school district was 3J and included students from grades 7 through 12, and received students from the Hillsboro elementary district and five other elementary districts.[4]

The Hillsboro School District Board of Directors (school board) consists of seven elected members serving four-year terms. Board members receive no pay for their work on the Board. The district is part of the Northwest Regional Education Service District.[6] The district also runs a special alternative school and the Hare Field athletic complex. The school district has drawn criticism for a 12-year contract signed with Coca-Cola to provide soft drinks to the district’s schools.[7]

History[edit]

Hillsboro’s first school district was formed in 1851 as School District 7.[8] The Reverend Horace Lyman established the district and was the first commissioner, with that title later becoming school superintendent.[8] The first school in the district was a single-room log cabin built in 1853 after a school levy was passed to raise $600 for construction.[8] In 1875, a new frame constructed school was built, with the smaller log cabin kept for additional space.[8]

Map of Hillsboro and school locations as of 2008

Then in 1890 a new eight-room schoolhouse was finished at the present site of David Hill Elementary.[8] In September 1908, tenth grade was added to the Hillsboro school district, with the classes held on the top floor of the school.[9] Eleventh and twelfth grades were soon added, and in June 1911 the first students to complete four years of high school graduated.[10] This class totaled five students, four girls and one boy.[10] A stand alone high school was completed by 1913,[11] and a gymnasium was built beginning in 1915.[12] The district overall employed a total of 19 teachers for the 1913 to 1914 school year.[13]

All five of the teachers in the High School district resigned in 1914 in a dispute with management.[14] The school board had allowed the students to vote on which teachers to retain, which the teachers resented even though all were retained in the vote.[14] The mass walkout led to classes being canceled for a time.[14] The district paid high school teachers $133 per month, and the other teachers $125 per month, and the principals earned $1500 per year for the 1920 to 1921 school year.[15] In 1929, a new high school building was finished with additional buildings and the wings added later.[8] The neighboring Cornelius school district was dissolved in 1960, and part of their enrollment area was shifted to the Hillsboro districts, while the remainder went to the Forest Grove School District.[16]

Brookwood Elementary was opened in 1953, followed by Poynter Junior High, Brown Junior High, and Mooberry Elementary all in 1963.[8] In May 1961, voters in all the districts feeding the high school voted on a proposal to merge into a single district.[17] Voters decided not to merge, but the next year in February voters did approve merging the junior high grades into the high school district.[18] The high school district then purchased Poynter from the elementary district for $772,566, and passed a bond measure in March 1962 to pay for that purchase, expand the school, and pay for the new junior high school that became Brown.[19]

The district opened Hare Field in 1965, a multi-sport facility with a track, baseball stadium, and football field.[20][21] In 1970, a new senior high school opened on 48 acres (190,000 m2) on the south side of Hillsboro, with enrollment of the high school district reaching 3,621 students that year.[8] The Union High School District's teachers held a three-day strike in March 1973 over their contracts, the first teacher's strike in Oregon history.[22]

By 1987, enrollment in all the districts feeding into the high school district along with the high school district reached approximately 12,325 students.[23] In 1987, the Union High School District began plans to unify the high school district with the six elementary districts that feed into the district's junior and senior high schools.[23] In 1991, the Oregon Legislature passed a law requiring school districts to unify by 1996, which forced some reluctant elementary districts to unify into the Hillsboro School District.[24] On July 1, 1996, Hillsboro Elementary, North Plains, Farmington View, Groner, Reedville, West Union, and Hillsboro Union High School districts unified into a single district, the fifth largest in Oregon at that time.[25]

Twenty-first century[edit]

In 2003, the district made national news when 17 days of classes were cut from the school year which allowed students to be out in May due to budget cuts to education in Oregon.[26] That year enrollment reached 18,951 for the unified district.[27] In 2006, the district implemented a statistical tracking program that keeps track of all student information such as demographics, attendance, and academic achievement.[28]

The district faced opposition in 2009 over the demolition of J. B. Thomas Middle School, a building preservationists wanted to save for use as a community building.[29] The district planned to tear down the old building after a 2006 bond measure approved construction of several new schools including a new middle school, and expansion at the other existing middle schools.[30] A new elementary school was built with funds from this levy on the eastern part of Thomas' grounds, with the buildings of the old school to be torn down to make way for athletic fields.[29] In July 2009, a court allowed the demolition to go forward.[30]

By November 2009 the district had become the first in Oregon to use an Internet-based crisis management program to allow for easier access to information on schools by the district.[31] HSD purchased 40 acres (16 ha) in the South Hillsboro area in April 2014 to house a fifth high school, and along with prior acquisitions could add up to four elementary schools and a middle school in that area.[32]

Schools[edit]

The district operates 32 schools, including four high schools, four middle schools, and 26 elementary schools.[33] HSD also operates an alternative combined middle and high school as well as a charter school. As of April 2008, four new elementary schools and one new middle school were under construction.[33] Staffing includes 1,089 full-time classified employees, 1,105 full-time teachers, and 73 administrator staff members.[33] The average student to teacher ratio is 26:1 with a 3.5% drop-out rate for the 2005 to 2006 school year.[33] In the 2009 school year, the district had 403 students classified as homeless by the Department of Education, or 2.0% of students in the district.[34] The annual budget is $216 million.[35]

Elementary schools[edit]

The 25 elementary schools in the district serve students in kindergarten through sixth grade.[36]

Brookwood[edit]

Brookwood

Located in the middle portion of the city on Southeast Cedar Street, the single-story Brookwood Elementary opened in 1953 and was named after the area.[8][37] It was the first building in the district to be built using prefabricated forms, and had to be expanded in 1957.[8] The building now totals 40,641 square feet (3,775.7 m2) of space.[38] The school's mascot is the bobcat,[37] and enrollment at the school is 448 students.[39] As of 2009, the school has repeatedly missed targets for federal academics and is on the troubled list, scored 73.5 on the state's achievement index, and was listed as satisfactory by the state for achievement.[39]

Butternut Creek[edit]

Butternut Creek

Originally part of the Reedville School District, Butternut Creek is located east of Hillsboro in Reedville.[40] The school opened in 1977 with ten classrooms,[40] with the students known as the Bulldogs.[41][42] Butternut Creek is a single-story, wood-sided structure with a total of 42,638 square feet (3,961.2 m2) of space.[43] The school has 452 students and is named after the nearby creek of the same name, a tributary of the Tualatin River.[42] As of 2009, the school has repeatedly met all targets for federal academics, scored 87.5 on the state's achievement index, and was listed as satisfactory by the state for achievement.[42]

Eastwood[edit]

Eastwood

Home of the Eagles, the school is located in the central part of the city on Northeast Lincoln Street adjacent to Shadywood Park.[44] The single-story building is faced with red-brick and has 45,963 square feet (4,270.1 m2) of space.[45] Eastwood opened in 1978 and has a current enrollment of 467 students.[44][46] As of 2009, the school has missed its target for federal academics and is on a watch list, scored 76.5 on the state's achievement index, and was listed as satisfactory by the state for achievement.[46]

Farmington View[edit]

Farmington View

Opened in 1950, Farmington View was previously a part of its own single school district prior to unification in 1996.[25] Prior to 1950 the schoolhouse for the district was in several other locations, including on Rood Bridge Road at Burkhalter Road east of the current building site. Located south of Hillsboro on Oregon Route 219, the school has an enrollment of 206, and students are known as the Bobcats.[47][48] The single-story school building has 20,467 square feet (1,901.4 m2) of space.[49] As of 2009, the school has repeatedly met all targets for federal academics, scored 101.0 on the state's achievement index, and was listed as outstanding by the state for achievement.[48]

Free Orchards[edit]

Free Orchards

Located in the neighboring city of Cornelius to the west of Hillsboro, Free Orchards is named for the original name for Cornelius.[50] The school is on the eastern edge of the Cornelius on the south side of TV Highway (Baseline Street). Home to the Foxes, the school opened in September 2008 and has an enrollment of 453.[51] The two-story building was paid for from a 2006 bond measure.[52]

Groner[edit]

Groner

Originally the only school in the independent Groner School District, the school opened in 1949,[53] and was merged into the Hillsboro district in 1996.[25] The Groner district was created by a merger of the schools for the communities of Midway, Jacktown, and Mountainside south of Hillsboro in 1946.[53] The current school consists of three single-story structures, with one also having a basement, and two have a brick veneer.[54] In all the school has 32,402 square feet (3,010.2 m2) of space.[54]

Part of the enrollment area of the school was proposed to be transferred to the Beaverton School District in 2010.[55] Located in the community of Scholls along Oregon Route 210, Groner has 190 students, known as the Grizzles.[56][57] As of 2009, the school has repeatedly missed targets for federal academics and is on the troubled list, scored 79.8 on the state's achievement index, and was listed as satisfactory by the state for achievement.[57]

W. L. Henry[edit]

Henry

Opened in 1968, the school is located in the central part of Hillsboro, adjoining Turner Creek Park.[8] Known as the Wildcats, the school has 628 students.[58][59] The school is named for Walter L. Henry who worked in the district for 38 years as a teacher and principal.[8] The single-story structure has 48,813 square feet (4,534.9 m2) of space.[60]

As of 2009, the school has repeatedly missed targets federal academic guidelines and must either offer free tutoring or transfers to students under the No Child Left Behind Act.[59][61] Under state goals, Henry scored 54.1 on the state's achievement index, and was listed as needs improvement for achievement.[59] Henry was the only school in the district listed as needs improvement by the state in 2009.[62]

Imlay[edit]

Imlay

Imlay Elementary is located in southeastern Hillsboro near Century High School.[63] The school, known as the Eagles, opened in 2002.[63][64] As of 2009, the school has repeatedly met all targets for federal academics, scored 93.7 on the state's achievement index, and was listed as outstanding by the state for achievement.[65] The school has 624 students.[65]

Indian Hills[edit]

Indian Hills

Opened in 1979, the school was originally part of the Reedville School District that merged into the Hillsboro district in 1996.[25] Known as the Bears, the 450 student school is on the eastern edge of Hillsboro in the Reedville area along Rock Road.[66][67] The one-story building contains 45,181 square feet (4,197.5 m2).[68] As of 2009, the school has repeatedly met all targets for federal academics, scored 104.3 on the state's achievement index, and was listed as outstanding by the state for achievement.[67]

Jackson[edit]

Jackson

Located in the north-central part of Hillsboro along Northeast Jackson School Road, the school opened in 1990.[69] The school's mascot is the jaguar,[70] and enrollment at the school is 536 students.[71] The school building is a single-story, brick structure with 48,367 square feet (4,493.4 m2) of space.[72] As of 2009, the school has repeatedly met all targets for federal academics, scored 97.2 on the state's achievement index, and was listed as outstanding by the state for achievement.[71]

Ladd Acres[edit]

Ladd Acres

Originally part of the Reedville School District, the school opened in 1968 with eight classrooms, later expanded in 1974.[25][40][69] Named for William S. Ladd, the school is located on Cornelius Pass Road on the eastern edge of Hillsboro in the Reedville area.[69] The 624 students are known as the Astros.[73][74] The one-story building totals 60,825 square feet (5,650.8 m2) of space.[75] As of 2009, the school has repeatedly met all targets for federal academics, scored 84.4 on the state's achievement index, and was listed as satisfactory by the state for achievement.[73]

Lenox[edit]

Lenox

Named for early settler David Thomas Lenox who helped establish the nearby West Union Baptist Church, the school's mascot is the pioneers.[76] Located in the Rock Creek area near the Sunset Highway and Cornelius Pass Road, the school has 390 students.[76][77] The school opened in 1978 and was originally part of the West Union School District.[25][69] A single-story, the structure covers 51,074 square feet (4,744.9 m2) of space.[78] As of 2009, the school has repeatedly met all targets for federal academics, scored 96.8 on the state's achievement index, and was listed as outstanding by the state for achievement.[77]

Lincoln Street[edit]

Lincoln Street

Opened in 2008, the school is located in downtown Hillsboro and replaced David Hill Elementary.[50] The two-story, brick-faced structure was paid for from a 2006 bond measure.[52] Students at the 533-pupil school are known as the Lynx.[69][79]

W. Verne McKinney[edit]

McKinney

Built for $941,000, the school was named after longtime Hillsboro Argus publisher and editor W. Verne McKinney.[8] Opened in 1970, this was the first of the open classroom schools in the district with multiple grades held in one large classroom.[8] The school is located in northwest Hillsboro and the 504 students are known as the Cougars.[80][81] The single-story structure has 53,129 square feet (4,935.8 m2) of space.[82] As of 2009, the school has repeatedly met all targets for federal academics, scored 84.9 on the state's achievement index, and was listed as satisfactory by the state for achievement.[81]

Minter Bridge[edit]

Minter Bridge

Named for the nearby street of the same name, the school is located in southeast Hillsboro adjacent to Hillsboro High School. The school opened in 1980 and the 446 students are known as the Dolphins.[83][84] The school building is a single-story, brick-faced structure with 47,563 square feet (4,418.7 m2) of space.[85] As of 2009, the school has repeatedly met all targets for federal academics, scored 85 on the state's achievement index, and was listed as satisfactory by the state for achievement.[84]

Mooberry[edit]

Mooberry

Mooberry is located in northeast Hillsboro on 10th Street. The 34,400-square-foot (3,200 m2) school opened in 1963 at a cost of $348,000.[8] Known as the Mustangs, the school has 508 students.[86][87] The school was named after two teachers, Lester and Margaret Mooberry.[8] The school building is a single-story, brick-faced structure with the school grounds covering 215,000 square feet (20,000 m2).[88] As of 2009, the school has repeatedly missed targets federal academic guidelines and must either offer free tutoring or transfers to students under the No Child Left Behind Act.[61] Under state goals, Mooberry scored 67.6 on the state's achievement index, and was listed as satisfactory for achievement.[87]

North Plains[edit]

North Plains

Located north of Hillsboro in the city of North Plains on Northwest North Avenue, the school was part of the North Plains Elementary School District 70 until unified with the Hillsboro district in 1996.[25] The North Plains district was formed in 1886, with the current elementary school constructed in 1954.[4] The school building is a single-story structure with 46,913 square feet (4,358.4 m2) of space.[89] Students at the 317 student school are known as the Hawks.[90][91] As of 2009, the school has repeatedly met all targets for federal academics, scored 100.9 on the state's achievement index, and was listed as outstanding by the state for achievement.[91]

Orenco[edit]

Orenco

The Orenco neighborhood, once a city east of Hillsboro incorporated from 1913 to 1938, formed a school district (district 38) in 1908 when it split from the Shute district.[92] The community was laid out in 1908 and the first school building was opened in 1909 near 228th and Birch.[92] The school grew to include high school classes by 1918.[93] Orenco's school district was later merged into the West Union School District and the school was later torn down after 1976, though the district retained the land.[4]

In 1996, the West Union district merged into the Hillsboro district,[4] and in 2000 the new Orenco Elementary school opened on the same property as the old school, though a block east of the original school building.[94] Known as the Orcas, the school has 424 students.[95][96] The school building is a two-story, brick-faced structure with 69,435 square feet (6,450.7 m2) of space.[97] As of 2009, the school has repeatedly met all targets for federal academics, scored 95.1 on the state's achievement index, and was listed as outstanding by the state for achievement.[96]

Paul L. Patterson[edit]

Patterson

Located in the northwest part of Hillsboro on Northeast Lenox Street, the elementary school opened in 2000.[98] The school is named after former Governor Paul L. Patterson and the school mascot is the panthers.[98] The school building is a two-story, brick-faced structure with 69,435 square feet (6,450.7 m2) of space.[99] As of 2009, the school has repeatedly met all targets for federal academics, scored 83.1 on the state's achievement index, and was listed as satisfactory by the state for achievement.[100] Enrollment at the school is 510 students.[100]

Quatama[edit]

Quatama

Opened in 2008 in the Orenco area near 231st and Cornell Road, the school is a short distance from Orenco Elementary and adjacent to Sonrise Church.[50] The two-story school has a capacity of 600,[101] with students known as the Coyotes.[102] The beige and silver-colored structure was paid for from a 2006 bond measure.[52] Quatama is named after the locale located about 1 mile east of the school where the Quatama MAX station sits. The community, settled by Hungarians who worked for the Oregon Nursery Company, received its name from the Quatama station on the Oregon Electric Railway at that location.[103]

Reedville[edit]

Reedville

Reedville School District 29 was formed by 1859 with a one-room schoolhouse built that same year at what is now Johnson Road and 209th Avenue.[40] In 1920, that building was demolished and a three-room school was built at the same site.[40] The school continued to expand, growing to 12 classrooms, a gym, and several other rooms by 1976.[40] This single-story building remains in use as the current Reedville Elementary School, and has a total of 16,247 square feet (1,509.4 m2) of space.[104]

Located in the Reedville area, the school and district were merged into the Hillsboro district in 1996.[25] The 278-student school has Rams as their mascot.[105][106] As of 2009, the school has repeatedly met all targets for federal academics, scored 69.1 on the state's achievement index, and was listed as satisfactory by the state for achievement.[106]

Rosedale[edit]

Rosedale

Home of the Pride, the $21 million school opened in 2009 with a capacity of 600 students.[107] The two-story, red-brick building was paid for from a 2006 bond measure,[52] and has environmentally friendly features such as using recycled rainwater for irrigation.[107] The school has approximately 330 students, and became the first school in the district to reach LEED certification when it earned Gold status in February 2010.[108][109] The school is located in the southeastern part of Hillsboro, south of Tualatin Valley Highway (TV Highway) at the edge of the urban growth boundary.[52] In 1921, the Rosedale School District was established, but by 1955 the district had merged into the Hillsboro Elementary School District and the single Rosedale school was closed.[4][110]

L. C. Tobias[edit]

Tobias

Located southeast of Hillsboro near West Baseline Road and 206th Avenue, the 554 students at the school are known as the Tigers.[111][112] The 52,650-square-foot (4,891 m2), one-story, brick building was completed in 1992 and was originally part of the Reedville School District until the merger with the Hillsboro districts in 1996.[25][113] As of 2009, the school has missed its target for federal academics and is on a watch list, scored 80.4 on the state's achievement index, and was listed as satisfactory by the state for achievement.[112]

West Union[edit]

West Union

Opened in 1948 as part of the West Union School District, the district and school merged into the Hillsboro district in 1996.[25][114] West Union School District 1 was established in 1851 and was the first district in the county.[4] The school is located north of Hillsboro in the community of West Union. Known as the Wolverines, the school has an enrollment of 317.[115][116] As of 2009, the school has repeatedly met all targets for federal academics, scored 103.7 on the state's achievement index, and was listed as outstanding by the state for achievement.[116]

Witch Hazel[edit]

Witch Hazel

Located in southeast Hillsboro at Brookwood Avenue near TV Highway, the school is named for the former community of Witch Hazel where the school is situated. Opened in 2003, the current building replaced an older building located several blocks north on the south side of TV Highway where Brookwood Avenue now crosses the highway at the railroad tracks.[117] The old school had previously been in its own school district and the Reedville School District.[4][40]

The 655 students at the school are known as the Wolves.[118][119] As of 2009, the school has repeatedly missed targets federal academic guidelines and must either offer free tutoring or transfers to students under the No Child Left Behind Act.[61][118] At the state level, Witch Hazel scored 77.9 on the state's achievement index and was listed as satisfactory by the state for achievement.[118]

Middle schools[edit]

South Meadows
  • Brown Middle School
  • Evergreen Middle School
  • Poynter Middle School

South Meadows[edit]

Opened in 2009, the school replaced J. B. Thomas Middle School.[108] Thomas was home to the Trojans, and South Meadows is home to the Hawks.[120] The $41 million, two-story school has a capacity of 1,000 students, with enrollment at about 750 when it opened.[107] Silver and light brown in color, the building was paid for from a 2006 bond measure,[52] though Hillsboro's Parks Department provided an additional $500,000 to allow for a larger gym that is utilized by the parks department when school is not in session.[107]

The school is located in southeast Hillsboro, adjacent to Witch Hazel Elementary. South Meadows is Hillsboro's only school that has the middle school version of the International Baccalaureate program.[107] As of 2009, Thomas had repeatedly missed targets for federal academics and was on the troubled list, scored an 60.4 on the state's achievement index, was listed as satisfactory by the state for achievement, and had 547 students.[121] South Meadows receives students from W.L. Henry, Brookwood, Minter Bridge, Farmington View, Groner, Rosedale, and Witch Hazel elementary schools.[69]

High schools[edit]

In order of creation:

Other schools[edit]

Former schools[edit]

Thomas Middle School
  • Peter Boscow Elementary
  • David Hill Elementary
  • Barnes Junior High School
  • J. B. Thomas Middle/Junior High School: The beige-colored buildings were located on Northeast Lincoln at Sixth Avenue.[122] The main school building was a three-story structure with 47,096 square feet (4,375.4 m2) of space.[122] The eastern wing was constructed in 1963.[122]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Owen, Wendy (May 7, 2009). "Hillsboro School District names new superintendent". The Oregonian. Retrieved 2009-05-09. 
  2. ^ Owen, Wendy (October 22, 2009). "Enrollment up in Beaverton, Hillsboro and Sherwood school districts; down in Tigard-Tualatin". The Oregonian. Retrieved 2009-10-23. 
  3. ^ Oregon Public School Enrollment Increases during 2007-08. Oregon Department of Education. Retrieved on February 8, 2008.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i Benson, Robert L. (October 19, 1976). "Historic Potpourri: Courthouse fire destroys school records in '20s". Hillsboro Argus. p. 10. 
  5. ^ House, Kelly (November 4, 2013). "Multnomah County election: District boundary quirks put Hillsboro measure on ballot". The Oregonian. Retrieved 5 November 2013. 
  6. ^ Hillsboro board rethinks, accepts education service district budget. The Oregonian, February 27, 2003.
  7. ^ Warner, Melanie. Lines Are Drawn for Big Suit Over Sodas. The New York Times, December 7, 2005.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Philpott, Betty (October 19, 1976). "Schools and Churches: Hillsboro school began in one-room log cabin in 1854". The Hillsboro Argus. pp. 10–11. 
  9. ^ "Hillsboro Adds Tenth Grade". The Oregonian. September 21, 1908. p. 13. 
  10. ^ a b "Five Students of Hillsboro High School Complete Four Year Course". The Oregonian. June 6, 1911. p. 5. 
  11. ^ "Hillsboro Exercises Held". The Oregonian. June 1, 1913. p. 12. 
  12. ^ "Hillsboro High School Notes". The Oregonian. December 19, 1915. p. 10. 
  13. ^ "19 Teachers Are Engaged". The Oregonian. April 24, 1913. p. 6. 
  14. ^ a b c "Jobs up to Pupils; Teachers All quit". The Oregonian. April 24, 1914. p. 7. 
  15. ^ "School Budget Adopted". The Oregonian. April 17, 1920. p. 7. 
  16. ^ "Board To Mull Land Shift". The Oregonian. October 20, 1960. p. 18. 
  17. ^ "Vote Slated in Hillsboro". The Oregonian. May 14, 1961. p. 22. 
  18. ^ "Board Buys Junior High". The Oregonian. February 18, 1962. p. 22. 
  19. ^ "Voters Back Bond Issue". The Oregonian. March 13, 1962. p. 27. 
  20. ^ McKinney, Dick. Sparts win first game at Hare. The Hillsboro Argus, October 19, 1976.
  21. ^ Gaynair, Gillian. Hillsboro thinks things will go better with Coke. The Oregonian, May 21, 1998.
  22. ^ Culwell, Eva (March 29, 1973). "Vote ends school strike in Hillsboro". The Oregonian. pp. 1, 41. 
  23. ^ a b Ostergren, Jack. Hillsboro hears report on unified school district plan. The Oregonian, September 9, 1987.
  24. ^ Di Rado, Alicia. Agness stays true to its history. The Oregonian, October 1, 1995.
  25. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Franzen, Robin. Leaving nothing to chance. The Oregonian, May 30, 1996.
  26. ^ Oregon schools cutting class. CNN.com. Retrieved on February 8, 2008.
  27. ^ Most school districts in county see growth. The Oregonian, October 5, 2004.
  28. ^ Navas, Melissa. 'Data warehouse' tracks students. The Oregonian, May 17, 2007.
  29. ^ a b Owen, Wendy (June 28, 2009). "Fate of Hillsboro school rends city and district". The Oregonian. Retrieved 2009-07-06. 
  30. ^ a b Gordanier, Susan (July 2, 2009). "Judge clears way for Thomas demolition". The Hillsboro Argus. Retrieved 2009-07-06. 
  31. ^ Owen, Wendy (November 24, 2009). "Hillsboro schools using Web-based program to manage crises". The Oregonian. Retrieved 26 November 2009. 
  32. ^ Fuller, Kathy (April 11, 2014). "Prepping for the future". Hillsboro Tribune. Retrieved 12 April 2014. 
  33. ^ a b c d Fast Facts. Hillsboro School District. Retrieved on March 28, 2008.
  34. ^ "Count of homeless students in Oregon school districts, 2008-2009". The Oregonian. p. 6. Retrieved 2009-09-18. 
  35. ^ 2006-2007 Annual Report. Hillsboro School District. Retrieved on April 1, 2008.
  36. ^ "Elementary Schools (K-6)". Hillsboro School District. Retrieved 2009-09-09. 
  37. ^ a b "Brookwood". Hillsboro School District. October 30, 2008. Retrieved 11 December 2009. [dead link]
  38. ^ "Brookwood Elementary School". Rapid Visual Screening - Senate Bill #2 - Seismic Needs Assessment. Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries. 2006. Retrieved 29 March 2010. 
  39. ^ a b "Brookwood Elementary School". The Oregonian. Your Schools. OregonLive.com. Retrieved 11 December 2009. 
  40. ^ a b c d e f g Jensen, Doris (October 17, 1976). "Communities: Reedville named for early resident". Hillsboro Argus. p. 17. 
  41. ^ "Butternut Creek". Hillsboro School District. October 30, 2008. Retrieved 11 December 2009. [dead link]
  42. ^ a b c "Butternut Creek Elementary School". The Oregonian. Your Schools. OregonLive.com. Retrieved 11 December 2009. 
  43. ^ "Butternut Creek Elementary School". Rapid Visual Screening - Senate Bill #2 - Seismic Needs Assessment. Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries. 2006. Retrieved 29 March 2010. 
  44. ^ a b "Eastwood". Hillsboro School District. October 30, 2008. Retrieved 15 December 2009. [dead link]
  45. ^ "Eastwood Elementary School". Rapid Visual Screening - Senate Bill #2 - Seismic Needs Assessment. Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries. 2006. Retrieved 29 March 2010. 
  46. ^ a b "Eastwood Elementary School". The Oregonian. Your Schools. OregonLive.com. Retrieved 15 December 2009. 
  47. ^ "Farmington View". Hillsboro School District. October 30, 2008. Retrieved 15 December 2009. 
  48. ^ a b "Farmington View Elementary School". The Oregonian. Your Schools. OregonLive.com. Retrieved 15 December 2009. 
  49. ^ "Farmington View Elementary School". Rapid Visual Screening - Senate Bill #2 - Seismic Needs Assessment. Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries. 2006. Retrieved 29 March 2010. 
  50. ^ a b c Trappen, Michelle (December 22, 2007). "Where will they go? Hillsboro schools redraw the lines". The Oregonian. Retrieved 5 January 2010. 
  51. ^ "Free Orchards". Hillsboro School District. October 30, 2008. Retrieved 20 December 2009. [dead link]
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External links[edit]

Coordinates: 45°32′40″N 122°56′05″W / 45.544448°N 122.934726°W / 45.544448; -122.934726