Ice hockey at the 1964 Winter Olympics

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Ice hockey at the 1964 Winter Olympics
Tournament details
Host country  Austria
Dates 29 January – 9 February
Teams 16
Final positions
Champions Gold medal blank.svg  Soviet Union (2nd title)
Runner-up Silver medal blank.svg  Sweden
Third place Bronze medal blank.svg  Czechoslovakia
Fourth place  Canada
Tournament statistics
Matches played 56
Goals scored 469 (8.38 per match)
Attendance 199,450 (3,562 per match)
Scoring leader(s) Soviet Union Konstantin Loktev 15 points

At the 1964 Winter Olympics held in Innsbruck, Austria, one ice hockey event was held: men's ice hockey. This tournament was also counted as IIHF World Championship and IIHF European Championship. Games were held at the Olympiahalle Innsbruck. It was the Soviet's second Olympic, fourth World, and eighth European championships title. Canada used a national team for the first time, organized and coached by Father David Bauer. They still could have won Gold on the last day with a win over the Soviets, but ended up a controversial fourth.[1][2]

Medalists[edit]

Medal Team
Gold  Soviet Union
Silver  Sweden
Bronze  Czechoslovakia¹

¹The tie-breaking procedures for the Olympics were changed after the competition. By the rules that Canadian officials believed were being used (goal difference between the top four teams),[1][3] Canada was the bronze medal winner, but just before the medal ceremony this was changed, and Czechoslovakia won bronze by the new rules (goal difference in all games of the Olympics). In 2005, the International Ice Hockey Federation attempted to alter the results of World Championship, awarding Canadians a bronze medal, but then it changed its mind, and in September 2005 the IIHF finally rejected Canada's appeal to be awarded 3rd place.[4][5]

Qualification[edit]

Prior to the tournament it was determined that there would be a spot allocated for an Asia/Oceanic representative. Also, for the third (and final time) East played West to decide the German representative in the Olympic hockey tournament.

  • November 23, 1963
    • Japan 17-1 Australia
  • November 26, 1963
    • Japan 17-6 Australia

  • December 6, 1963
    • West Germany 4-4 East Germany
  • December 8, 1963
    • East Germany 3-4 West Germany

First Round (A/B)[edit]

Winners (in bold) qualified for the Group A to play for 1st-8th places. Teams which lost their qualification matches, played in Group B for 9th-16th places. Countries were seeded (roughly) from their placement at the 1963 World Ice Hockey Championships. Switzerland was the only 'B' pool team to win, defeating Norway who was also from the 'B' pool.

  • January 27
    • Switzerland 5-1 Norway
    • Canada 14-1 Yugoslavia
  • January 28
    • USSR 19-1 Hungary
    • Czechoslovakia 17-2 Japan
    • Sweden 12-2 Italy
    • USA 7-2 Romania
    • Germany (UTG) 2-1 Poland
    • Austria 2-8 Finland

World Championship Group A (Austria)[edit]

Final Round[edit]

First place team wins gold, second silver and third bronze.

Rank Team Pld W L T GF GA Pts
1  Soviet Union 7 7 0 0 54 10 14
2  Sweden 7 5 2 0 47 16 10
3  Czechoslovakia 7 5 2 0 38 19 10
4  Canada 7 5 2 0 32 17 10
5  United States 7 2 5 0 29 33 4
6  Finland 7 2 5 0 10 31 4
7  Germany[6] 7 2 5 0 13 49 4
8  Switzerland 7 0 7 0 9 57 0
  • January 29
    • USSR 5-1 USA
    • Czechoslovakia 11-1 Germany (UTG)
    • Canada 8-0 Switzerland
  • January 30
    • Finland 4-0 Switzerland
    • Canada 3-1 Sweden
  • January 31
    • USA 8-0 Germany (UTG)
    • USSR 7-5 Czechoslovakia
  • February 1
    • Czechoslovakia 4-0 Finland
    • USSR 15-0 Switzerland
    • Sweden 7-4 USA
  • February 2
    • Canada 4-2 Germany (UTG)
    • Sweden 7-0 Finland
  • February 3
    • Canada 8-6 USA
  • February 4
    • USSR 10-0 Finland
    • Czechoslovakia 5-1 Switzerland
    • Sweden 10-2 Germany (UTG)
  • February 5
    • Canada 6-2 Finland
    • USSR 10-0 Germany (UTG)
    • Sweden 12-0 Switzerland
    • Czechoslovakia 7-1 USA
  • February 7
    • Germany (UTG) 6-5 Switzerland
    • Finland 3-2 USA
    • USSR 4-2 Sweden
    • Czechoslovakia 3-1 Canada
  • February 8
    • Germany (UTG) 2-1 Finland
    • USA 7-3 Switzerland
    • USSR 3-2 Canada
    • Sweden 8-3 Czechoslovakia

World Championship Group B (Austria)[edit]

Consolation Round[edit]

Teams in this group play for 9th-16th places.

Rank Team Pld W L T GF GA Pts
9  Poland 7 6 1 0 40 13 12
10  Norway 7 5 2 0 40 19 10
11  Japan 7 4 2 1 35 31 9
12  Romania 7 3 3 1 31 28 7
13  Austria 7 3 3 1 24 28 7
14  Yugoslavia 7 3 3 1 29 37 7
15  Italy 7 2 5 0 24 42 4
16  Hungary 7 0 7 0 14 39 0
  • January 30
    • Austria 6-2 Yugoslavia
    • Poland 6-1 Romania
    • Italy 6-4 Hungary
    • Japan 4-3 Norway
  • January 31
    • Poland 4-2 Norway
    • Japan 6-4 Romania
  • February 1
    • Austria 3-0 Hungary
    • Yugoslavia 5-3 Italy
  • February 2
    • Norway 9-2 Italy
    • Romania 5-5 Yugoslavia
  • February 3
    • Poland 6-2 Hungary
    • Austria 5-5 Japan
  • February 4
    • Yugoslavia 6-4 Japan
  • February 5
    • Poland 7-0 Italy
    • Austria 2-5 Romania
    • Norway 6-1 Hungary
  • February 6
    • Austria 5-3 Italy
    • Yugoslavia 4-2 Hungary
    • Japan 4-3 Poland
    • Norway 4-2 Romania
  • February 8
    • Austria 2-8 Norway
    • Poland 9-3 Yugoslavia
    • Romania 6-2 Italy
    • Japan 6-2 Hungary
  • February 9
    • Austria 1-5 Poland
    • Norway 8-4 Yugoslavia
    • Romania 8-3 Hungary
    • Italy 8-6 Japan

Leading scorers[edit]

Rk Team GP G A Pts
1 Soviet Union Konstantin Loktev 8 6 9 15
2 Sweden Sven Tumba 8 11 3 14
3 Soviet Union Viktor Yakushev 8 9 4 13
4 Sweden Ulf Sterner 8 7 5 12
5 Czech Republic Josef Černý 8 6 6 12
T6 Czech Republic Jiří Dolana 8 8 3 11
T6 Soviet Union Vyacheslav Starshinov 8 8 3 11
8 Soviet Union Boris Majorov 8 5 5 10
9 Canada Gary Dineen 8 3 7 10
10 Sweden Anders Andersson 7 7 2 9

Final ranking[edit]

  1.  Soviet Union
  2.  Sweden
  3.  Czechoslovakia
  4.  Canada
  5.  United States
  6.  Finland
  7.  Germany
  8.  Switzerland
  9.  Poland
  10.  Norway
  11.  Japan
  12.  Romania
  13.  Austria
  14.  Yugoslavia
  15.  Italy
  16.  Hungary

European Championship final ranking[edit]

  1.  Soviet Union
  2.  Sweden
  3.  Czechoslovakia
  4.  Germany
  5.  Finland
  6.  Switzerland

Tournament awards[edit]

Originally Boris Mayorov was selected as best forward, but the Soviet coaches chose to present the award to Ivanov despite the fact that he was actually a defenseman.[3][5]

Citations[edit]

References[edit]