Immortalist Society

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Immortalist Society
Founded June 27, 1967; 47 years ago (1967-06-27)
Founder(s) Robert Ettinger and others
Headquarters
Coordinates 42°33′18.7″N 82°51′59.83″W / 42.555194°N 82.8666194°W / 42.555194; -82.8666194
Formerly called Cryonics Society of Michigan, Cryonics Association
Website cryonics.org/info.html

The Immortalist Society is a charitable 501(c)(3) organization devoted to research and education in the areas of cryonics and life extension. It was incorporated as a Michigan corporation by Robert Ettinger and five other local residents on June 27, 1967 as the Cryonics Society of Michigan, Inc.. In September 1976, the name of the corporation was changed to Cryonics Association in acknowledgement that its scope of operations was not limited to a single state. On October 20, 1985, the Articles of Incorporation were amended once more to change the name to Immortalist Society.

Organization[edit]

All Officers of the Immortalist Society are also Directors. As of May 2008, the Immortalist Society officers were:

President York Porter
Vice-President John Bull
Secretary Royse Brown
Treasurer John Besançon

Operation[edit]

Every two months the Immortalist Society publishes its flagship journal Long Life: Longevity through Technology (formerly The Immortalist), which is sent free to Members of the Cryonics Institute, but must be paid for by subscribers or Immortalist Society Members who do not join the Cryonics Institute. It is also available online for free. Long Life covers not only the activities of the Cryonics Institute, but activities of the American Cryonics Society and life extension news. Published six times per year, the magazine presents news, book reviews, technical articles, biographies, conference reports and other articles of interest to members.

The Immortalist Society is particularly supportive of the work of the Cryonics Institute. Donations to the Immortalist Society Research Fund are given to finance the research of Dr. Yuri Pichugin, the full-time Russian cryobiologist employed by the Cryonics Institute to develop vitrification mixture, improve perfusion protocol and find formulations to minimize cold ischemia (a concern for organ transplantation). Dr. Pichugin resigned from the Cryonics Institute in December 2007.[1] At the time of his resignation the Cryonics Institute noted that Dr. Pichugin intended to work in Russia and continue his research for the Cryonics Institute and other interested organizations on a contract basis.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dr. Pichugin resigns, Chana de Wolf visits". Cryonics Institute. 2007-12-14. Retrieved 2008-05-01. 

External links[edit]