International Union of Operating Engineers

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IUOE
IUOE logo.png
Full name International Union of Operating Engineers (IUOE)
Founded December 7, 1896
Members 400,000
Country United States, Canada
Affiliation AFL-CIO, CLC
Key people James T. Callahan, president
Office location Washington, D.C.
Website iuoe.org

The International Union of Operating Engineers (IUOE) is a trade union within the United States-based AFL-CIO representing primarily construction workers who work as heavy equipment operators, mechanics, surveyors, and stationary engineers (also called operating engineers or power engineers) who maintain heating and other systems in buildings and industrial complexes, in the United States and Canada.

Founded in 1896, it currently represents roughly 400,000 workers in approximately 170 local unions and operates nearly 100 apprenticeship programs.

Local 3[edit]

IUOE Local 3, based in Alameda, California, is the largest building and construction trades local in the U.S., with jurisdiction covering four states: California, Nevada, Hawaii and Utah. Most of Local 3's 42,600 members work as heavy equipment operators, and construction workers, but the local also represents public employees, such as maintenance workers and peace officers, Technical Engineers, Surveyors and Construction Inspectors as well as Building Inspectors. Local 3 is headed by Business Manager Russ Burns.

Local 94 headquarters, New York

Local 4[edit]

IUOE Local 4, based in Medway, Massachusetts, has over 4,500 members in central and eastern Massachusetts (including Boston, Massachusetts), eastern New Hampshire, and Maine.[1]

Local 14-14B[edit]

IUOE Local 14-14B, based in Flushing, New York, represents approximately 1,600 members working in the five boroughs of New York City.[2]

Local 98[edit]

IUOE Local 98, based in East Longmeadow, Massachusetts, represents approximately 1,300 members in Western Massachusetts, Western New Hampshire, and Vermont.[3]

Local 150[edit]

Local 150, based in Countryside, Illinois, is the third-largest local in the International (23,000 + Members) with jurisdiction in parts of three states: Illinois, Indiana and Iowa. Local 150's President and Business Manager is James "Jim" Sweeney. Local 150 represents the most traditional Operating Engineers (Hoisting and Portable, Heavy-Highway, Building Trade, Quarry, Landfill, and Underground) employees in the International. Local 150 has an advanced Operating Engineers (Hoisting and Portable) apprenticeship program.[4]

Local 825[edit]

Local 825 covers New Jersey and the 'lower counties' (Rockland, Orange, Ulster, Sullivan & Delaware) of New York State. The Local 825 Business Manager is Greg Lalevee. The Local 825 training center is located adjacent to the NJ Turnpike.[5]

Local 115[edit]

Local 115, based in Burnaby, British Columbia Canada, represents over 10,000 skilled workers in construction, road building, transportation, mining, aviation and various industrial sectors throughout British Columbia and the Yukon. Local 115's Business Manager is Brian Cochrane and its President is Wayne Mills. Local 115 runs a Training Institute that is accredited with Private Career Training Institutions and delivers programs in accordance with British Columbia’s Industry Training Authority. Students learn how to operate many different pieces of heavy equipment in a real-life environment at its Maple Ridge Training Facility, a 41-acre site operated by the Training Association. This state-of-the-art facility also features a facility and heavy equipment inventory worth more than $3 million as well as computer simulation equipment. Courses are also offered in other centres around the region. Experienced and professional instructors provide courses in excavator, backhoe, dozer, grader, asphalt laydown, and aggregate/asphalt plant. Local 115 also provide all courses necessary for the BC Association of Crane Safety ticketing process.

Temporary Foreign Worker legal challenge[edit]

In 2013, IUOE Local 115, along with the BC Building Trades Union, had tried to overturn permits given to a Murray River coal mine near Tumbler Ridge, British Columbia to hire 201 Chinese temporary workers to work on a new mine owned by Chinese nationals. The unions claimed that the job ads were written to exclude Canadian workers, and instead chose to hire Chinese workers for lower wages rather than source or train local miners from the immediate area or the province.

However a federal court judge disagreed. Russell Zinn found that HD Mining, the owner of the coal mine had fulfilled the requirements set out in a federally-mandated Labour Market Opinion (LMO) and dismissed the unions’ challenge. However, public and media attention on the case resulted in some changes being implemented into the Canadian Temporary Foreign Worker Program to ensure that foreign workers are not chosen over local resources, where available. [6]

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