It's Five O'Clock Somewhere

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"It's Five O'Clock Somewhere"
Single by Alan Jackson featuring Jimmy Buffett
from the album Greatest Hits Volume II
B-side "That'd Be Alright"[1]
Released June 2, 2003
Recorded May 2003
Genre Country
Length 3:52
Label Arista Nashville
Writer(s) Jim "Moose" Brown
Don Rollins
Producer(s) Keith Stegall
Certification Gold (RIAA)
Alan Jackson singles chronology
"That'd Be Alright"
(2002)
"It's Five O'Clock Somewhere"
(2003)
"Remember When"
(2003)
Jimmy Buffett singles chronology
"Far Side for the World"
(2002)
"It's Five O'Clock Somewhere"
(2003)
"Hey Good Lookin'"
(2004)

"It's Five O'Clock Somewhere" is a song performed by Alan Jackson with Jimmy Buffett, and written by Jim "Moose" Brown and Don Rollins. It was released in June 2003 as the lead single from Jackson's 2003 compilation album Greatest Hits Volume II. It spent eight non-consecutive weeks at Number One on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart in summer of 2003. In addition, the song hit number 17 on the US Hot 100, making it the biggest pop hit for Jackson and the first top forty hit for Buffett since the seventies. On November 5, 2003, it also won the Country Music Association (CMA) Award for Vocal Event of the Year. The song became the #3 country song of the decade on Billboard's Hot Country Songs Chart.

Content[edit]

The title refers to a popular expression used to justify drinking at any time of day, given that somewhere in the world it's 5:00 p.m. (the end of the work day for a traditional "nine-to-five" worker). The narrator states that he hasn't had a day off in over a year and that he wants to leave work and relieve his stress by drinking alcohol. The lyrics include the phrase, "It's only half-past twelve but I don't care. It's five o'clock somewhere", which means that even though it is not five o'clock in the narrator's time zone, it must be in another part of the world.

History[edit]

Jim "Moose" Brown wrote "It's Five O'Clock Somewhere" with Don Rollins. Although Brown had several other cuts recorded by other artists, this song was the first to make the final cut of an album. The title lyric was inspired by a teacher who worked with Rollins. Brown recorded the demo and offered it to Kenny Chesney, who turned it down. It was then offered to Alan Jackson, who said that he was looking for a song that he could record as a duet with Jimmy Buffett.[2]

Music video[edit]

The portion of the music video featuring Jimmy Buffett was shot at Verizon Wireless Music Center in Noblesville, Indiana. The tiki bar featured in the video is the Square Grouper in Jupiter, Florida, near Jackson's home. It also features Jackson's personal boat, the "Hullbilly".

Chart performance[edit]

"It's Five O'Clock Somewhere" debuted at number 31 on the U.S. Billboard Hot Country Songs for the week of June 21, 2003. The song held the number 1 position for 7 consecutive weeks, falling to number 2 on the chart dated September 27, 2003 while Dierks Bentley's "What Was I Thinkin'" overtook it at number 1. On the following chart (October 4), Bentley's song fell, allowing "It's Five O'Clock Somewhere" to return to number 1 for an eighth and final week. The song has sold 1,332,000 copies in the US as of April 2014.[3]

Chart (2003) Peak
position
US Hot Country Songs (Billboard)[4] 1
US Billboard Hot 100[5] 17

Year-end chart[edit]

Chart (2003) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot Country Songs 4
Preceded by
"Red Dirt Road" by Brooks & Dunn
"What Was I Thinkin'" by Dierks Bentley
U.S. Hot Country Singles & Tracks
number-one single

August 9–September 20, 2003 (first run)
October 4, 2003 (second run)
Succeeded by
"What Was I Thinkin'" by Dierks Bentley
"Real Good Man" by Tim McGraw

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2008). Hot Country Songs 1944 to 2008. Record Research, Inc. p. 201. ISBN 0-89820-177-2. 
  2. ^ Gazdziak, Sam (14 December 2010). "The story behind "It's Five O'Clock Somewhere"". The 9513. Retrieved 14 December 2010. 
  3. ^ Grein, Paul (April 16, 2014). "Chart Watch: "Happy" tops 4M". Yahoo! Music. Yahoo!. 
  4. ^ "Alan Jackson Album & Song Chart History" Billboard Hot Country Songs for Alan Jackson.
  5. ^ "Alan Jackson Album & Song Chart History" Billboard Hot 100 for Alan Jackson.