Jewish Standard

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Jewish Standard
Jewish Standard logo.jpg
Type Weekly newspaper
Founded 1931
Headquarters Teaneck, New Jersey
ISSN 0021-6747
Official website www.jstandard.com

The Jewish Standard is a newspaper based in Teaneck, New Jersey, USA, that primarily serves the Jewish community in Bergen County and Northeastern New Jersey.[1][2] The Jewish Standard was founded in 1931, and is the oldest Jewish weekly in New Jersey.[3][4][5]

Unaffiliated with any program, organization, or movement, it states it is dedicated to giving expression to all phases of Jewish life. The Jewish Standard is independently owned, and says it is committed to "Jewish continuity and to Israel and America's well-being that have made both countries blessed."[6]

Expansion[edit]

In 1984, the company took over publishing of the Jewish Community News, the Jewish newspaper of Passaic County.[6] In 1991, the company began publishing the Rockland Jewish Reporter as the official publication of The Jewish Federation of Rockland County.[6] In 2002, the company began publishing About Our Children, a source for information for Jewish families.[6]

The papers have won numerous awards from the American Jewish Press Association, the North Jersey Press Club, the Society of Professional Journalists and from Parenting Publications of America.[6]

Competition[edit]

The Jewish Standard competes with the New Jersey Jewish News.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jerome H Blass (2012). The Family Counselor. Retrieved April 12, 2013. 
  2. ^ New Jersey: A Guide to Its Present and Past. North American Book Dist LLC. 1939. Retrieved April 12, 2013. 
  3. ^ Carolyn Farquhar Ulrich (1987). Ulrich's International Periodicals Directory. Bowker. Retrieved April 12, 2013. 
  4. ^ Joseph Jacobs Organization (1972). The Joseph Jacobs directory of the Jewish press in America. Retrieved April 12, 2013. 
  5. ^ Ethnic directory of New Jersey. W. H. Wise. 1978. Retrieved April 12, 2013. 
  6. ^ a b c d e "About Us". The Jewish Standard. Retrieved April 12, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Whiplash Can Follow a Car Crash or a Wedding Announcement, by Peter Applebome". New York Times. October 6, 2010. 

External links[edit]