Kingmaker

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Kingmaker is a term that refers to a person or group that has great influence in a royal or political succession, without being a viable candidate. Kingmakers may use political, monetary, religious, and military means to influence the succession. Originally, the term applied to the activities of Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick—"Warwick the Kingmaker"—during the Wars of the Roses in England.[1] Kingmakers may be assigned as Minister of State without Portfolio.

Examples include:

In game theory[edit]

In game theory, a kingmaker is a player who lacks sufficient resources or position to win at a given game, but possesses enough remaining resources to decide which of the remaining viable players will eventually win.

Contemporary usage[edit]

By analogy, "Kingmaker" is also used in some countries to refer to those individuals with the ability to influence the selection of political leaders. The term though always unofficial, has tended to gain more importance in places of power struggle—e.g., politics, sports organizations etc. Consequently, bestowment of such a title is looked upon significantly and more often as a means of indirect gratification for individuals wanting to silently dictate the affairs of the organization. The term is also occasionally used in a pejorative sense during elections, where a small number of independent political candidate(s) who hold a sizable sway in the "vote bank", can most likely decide the course of an outcome.

Instead of referring to an individual, the term can also be applied to institutions or think tanks whose opinions are held in great regard by the interested organization. The influence of the religious orders like the Roman Catholic Church in running the affairs of the state during medieval times (through the King) is a well-known example. Kingdoms and empires in the Indian sub-continent often relied on their religious heads. Besides religious orders, even countries can fit into this terminology when they can dictate the affairs of the other country (either directly or indirectly). In current political scenarios across the world the term can expand its scope to include powerful lobbying groups, whose role is often seen as a defining factor on major issues.

Modern kingmakers[edit]

Modern politicians known as "kingmaker" include:

In fiction[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ BBC News: "What is a 'kingmaker'?"
  2. ^ "Kingmaker". Tititudorancea.com. 2009-05-19. Retrieved 2012-04-14. 
  3. ^ "The King Maker Kamaraj, Former Chief Minister of Tamilnadu and Former President of All India Congress Committee". Kamaraj.com. Retrieved 2012-04-14. 
  4. ^ Name (required). "Sonia Gandhi, the king-maker of India « Sumangal's space". Sumangalgenius.wordpress.com. Retrieved 2012-04-14. 
  5. ^ Over-50 (2010-09-25). "Dick Morris: Kingmaker - Over-50". Over-50.typepad.com. Retrieved 2012-04-14. 
  6. ^ Zee news
  7. ^ Politico
  8. ^ "Obama's Power Players: Axelrod Helps Refine the President's Message", U.S. News & World Report, 19 May 2009.
  9. ^ Nyasa Times
  10. ^ {{cite web|url=http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/8440502.stm |title=Nick Clegg 'will not be a post-election king-maker' |publisher=BBC News |date=2010-01-05 |accessdate=2012-04-14}}
  11. ^ http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-63177527.html