Lakeview, Oregon

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Lakeview, Oregon
City
Welcome sign at the north end of town
Welcome sign at the north end of town
Nickname(s): The Tallest Town in Oregon
Location in Lake County and Oregon
Location in Lake County and Oregon
Coordinates: 42°11′20″N 120°20′45″W / 42.18889°N 120.34583°W / 42.18889; -120.34583Coordinates: 42°11′20″N 120°20′45″W / 42.18889°N 120.34583°W / 42.18889; -120.34583
Country United States
State Oregon
County Lake
Incorporated 1889
Government
 • Mayor Mike Patrick[1]
Area[2]
 • Total 2.34 sq mi (6.06 km2)
 • Land 2.33 sq mi (6.03 km2)
 • Water 0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)
Elevation 4,802 ft (1,463.6 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 2,294
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 2,261
 • Density 984.5/sq mi (380.1/km2)
Time zone Pacific (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) Pacific (UTC-7)
ZIP code 97630
Area code(s) 541
FIPS code 41-40700[3]
GNIS feature ID 1144791[5]
Website www.lakevieworegon.org

Lakeview is an incorporated city in Lake County, Oregon, United States. The population was 2,294 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Lake County. The town bills itself as the "Tallest Town in Oregon" because of its elevation. Lakeview is situated in the Goose Lake Valley at the foot of the Warner Mountains and at the edge of Oregon's high desert country. Its economy is based on agriculture, lumber production, and government activities. In addition, tourism is an increasingly important part of the town's economy. Oregon's Outback Scenic Byway passes through Lakeview.

History[edit]

Native Americans may have occupied the area around Lakeview for as much as 14,000 years, as evidenced by artifacts found in the Paisley Caves north of Lakeview.[6][7] When the first white explorers came through the Goose Lake Valley, Shoshone speaking people were living in the area.[8]

In 1827, Peter Skene Ogden led a brigade of Hudson's Bay Company trappers through the Goose Lake Valley. He was followed in 1832 by John Work and his trappers. Work noted the hot springs north Goose Lake (now called Hunter's Hot Springs) in his journal. The hot springs are approximately 2 miles (3.2 km) north the Lakeview town site.[9][10]

In 1867 and 1868, General George Crook led United States Army units and Indian scouts from the Wasco and Warm Springs tribes in a successful campaign against Northern Paiute bands in Eastern Oregon and northern California. This was part of the conflict known as the Snake War. Crook used Camp Warner as his supply depot and administrative headquarters. The camp was abandoned in 1874. Camp Warner was located northeast of the site that is now Lakeview.[11][12][13][14]

In 1867, M. W. Bullard settled along Bullard Creek at the mouth of Bullard Canyon at the northern end of the Goose Lake Valley. This is the location that eventually became the town of Lakeview. William Heryford brought cattle into the Goose Lake Valley in 1872. In 1873, the area's first post office was opened at the Tenbrook Ranch, south of present day Lakeview.[9]

Lake County was separated from Jackson County and Wasco County in 1874. The temporary county seat was located in Linkville (now Klamath Falls, Oregon). In June 1876, an election was held to select a permanent county seat. Prior to the election, W. M. Bullard offered to donate 20 acres (8.1 ha) along Bullard Creek in the Goose Lake Valley as a site for the county courthouse. In the election, "Bullard Creek" received 120 votes while Linkville got only 88 votes. However, a majority of the 384 votes cast was needed to determine the permanent county seat. Bullard Creek fell short because many voters wrote in names like "Goose Lake", "Goose Lake Valley", "Bullard's ranch", or "Bullard's creek". As a result, a second elect was scheduled in November 1876. Prior to that election, the town of Lakeview was organized at a meeting of Goose Lake Valley residents. The town site they selected was on Bullard Creek. In the second election, the new town site of Lakeview was select to replace Linkville as Lake County's seat of government. After the election, Bullard donated 20 acres (8.1 ha) for the county courthouse as promised. Bullard sold an additional 300 acres (120 ha) to John A. Moon, who filed a town plat with the state of Oregon, officially creating the town of Lakeview. The Lakeview post office was opened on 8 December 1876.[7][15][16]

On 22 May 1900, a fire burned most of Lakeview. No lives were lost, but sixty-four buildings were destroyed. Only two business structures in the downtown area survived the fire. However, the staff of the Lake County Examiner newspaper rescued enough equipment and material to publish a special edition the day after the fire. Most of the town was rebuilt by October of that year. The town's rapid recovery was due in large part to the financing and leadership provided by Bernard Daly.[16][17][18][19]

The Federal government established the Goose Lake Forest Reserve in 1906. Later that year, the name was changed to Fremont National Forest Reserve to honor Captain John C. Fremont, who explored the area in 1843. In 1908, the Fremont National Forest was created, administered by the United States Forest Service. The forest headquarters was located in Lakeview.[20][21]

Second county courthouse built in 1909

In 1909, the Oregon Valley Land Company conducted a week-long auction to dispose of land grants acquired from the construction of the Oregon Central Military Wagon Road in 1865 and 1869. The auction was advertised nationwide. The rural parcels also included a separate town lot in Lakeview. Thousands of people came to Lakeview for the auction and many others purchased property sight-unseen. During the auction, a total of 340,000 acres (140,000 ha) were sold in approximately 14,000 parcels. Only a few of the buyers ever moved onto the land they purchased. Lake County used part of its income from the sale to finance a new county courthouse. The new brick courthouse was built in the center of town, replacing the wooden building that had served as the county court since 1876.[22][23]

In 1911, a narrow gauge railway connected Lakeview with Reno, Nevada. The Nevada-California-Oregon Railway operated the line until 1927, when it was sold to the Southern Pacific Railroad. Southern Pacific converted the track to standard gage. The new standard rail connection prompted several sawmills to begin operating in Lakeview, expanding the town's economic base.[24][25]

Heryford Brothers Building built in 1913

In 1913, William P.Heryford commissioned the construction of a three-story commercial building in downtown Lakeview, across the street from the Lake County courthouse. The Heryford Brothers Building cost approximately $100,000 to construct. When it was completed, the building was the largest and most expensive structure in Lakeview. It was also the most modern, with its own power generator, central stream heat, elevators, electric lights, hot water, and telephones.[26][27][28]

By 1940, Lakeview had seven sawmills operating in town. All of the mills had recently installed new dry kilns which allowed year around operations. This increased winter employment opportunities in Lakeview, increasing economic stability in the community. The number of sawmills decrease during World War II, leaving only three by 1946. That year, only 39,000,000 board feet of timber was cut on the Fremont National Forest. However, that national forest's timber harvest increased to 81,200,000 board feet per year by 1952. To accommodate this increase, Lakeview's sawmills were expanded and modernized. In the 1950s, the payrolls and income from Lakeview's sawmills accounted for more than half of the town's economy.[29][30]

In the mid-1950s, a large number uranium mining claims were filed in the mountains north of Lakeview. However, only two mines, White King and Lucky Lass, were developed. In 1958, a uranium processing plant was built on the outskirts of Lakeview. The mill had the capacity to process 210 tons of uranium ore per day. The mill employed 50 people. Another 120 people were employed at the two mines.[31] The uranium plant closed in 1961.[32]

In 1985, Southern Pacific announced it planned to abandon its spur line to Lakeview. However, the company continued to operate the line until it was purchased by Lake County in January 1986. Lake County contracted operation of the line to Great Western Railway. In 1996, Lake County took over the railroad operation, and renamed it the Lake County Railroad. From 2007, the Modoc Northern Railroad leased the line from the county. In 2009, Frontier Rail began operating the line under the name Lake Railroad.[33]

Geography[edit]

Lakeview is located in the Goose Lake Valley at the foot of the Warner Mountains to the east. It is on the edge of the high desert country of southeastern Oregon. At an elevation of 4,800 feet (1,500 m), Lakeview is one of the highest cities in Oregon.[34]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 2.34 square miles (6.06 km2), of which, 2.33 square miles (6.03 km2) is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) is water.[2]

Climate[edit]

The city averages about 35 rainy days per year, 12 days with high temperatures of 90 °F (32 °C) or higher, and 167 days with low temperatures below freezing. The average temperature in January is 27 °F (−3 °C), and in July it is 67 °F (19 °C). Annual snowfall averages 54 inches (137 cm).[35]

Climate data for Lakeview, Oregon
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 37
(3)
40
(4)
47
(8)
57
(14)
65
(18)
74
(23)
85
(29)
84
(29)
74
(23)
63
(17)
49
(9)
40
(4)
59.6
(15.1)
Average low °F (°C) 18
(−8)
21
(−6)
25
(−4)
31
(−1)
36
(2)
43
(6)
49
(9)
47
(8)
40
(4)
33
(1)
26
(−3)
20
(−7)
32.4
(0.1)
Precipitation inches (mm) 1.9
(48)
1.8
(46)
1.5
(38)
1.1
(28)
1.4
(36)
1.1
(28)
0.3
(8)
0.2
(5)
0.6
(15)
1.0
(25)
1.6
(41)
1.8
(46)
14.3
(363)
Source: Weatherbase[35]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 270
1890 770 185.2%
1900 761 −1.2%
1910 1,253 64.7%
1920 1,139 −9.1%
1930 1,799 57.9%
1940 2,466 37.1%
1950 2,831 14.8%
1960 3,260 15.2%
1970 2,705 −17.0%
1980 2,770 2.4%
1990 2,526 −8.8%
2000 2,474 −2.1%
2010 2,294 −7.3%
source:[3][36]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census of 2010, there were 2,294 people, 1,034 households, and 632 families residing in the town. The population density was 984.5 inhabitants per square mile (380.1 /km2). There were 1,212 housing units at an average density of 520.2 per square mile (200.9 /km2). The racial makeup of the town was 91.3% White, 1.6% Native American, 0.8% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 2.9% from other races, and 3.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.8% of the population.[3][37]

There were 1,034 households of which 27.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.7% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.1% had a male householder with no wife present, and 38.9% were non-families. 35.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.18 and the average family size was 2.78.[3]

The median age in the town was 43.9 years. 21.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23% were from 25 to 44; 28.3% were from 45 to 64; and 20.2% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 49.3% male and 50.7% female.[3]

2000 census[edit]

As of the census of 2000, there were 2,474 people, 1,037 households, and 695 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,582.7 people per square mile (612.3/km²). There were 1,220 housing units at an average density of 780.5 per square mile (302.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 91.47% White, 0.04% African American, 2.47% Native American, 0.93% Asian, 0.16% Pacific Islander, 3.07% other races, and 1.86% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.86% of the population.[3]

Lake County courthouse in Lakeview, 2008

There were 1,037 households out of which 29.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.3% were married couples living together, 9.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.9% were non-families. 30.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.85.[3]

In the city the population was spread out with 25.4% under the age of 18, 5.0% from 18 to 24, 24.1% from 25 to 44, 25.9% from 45 to 64, and 19.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 94.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.8 males.[3]

The median income for a household in the city was $30,960, and the median income for a family was $38,953. Males had a median income of $31,958 versus $22,198 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,649. About 14.3% of families and 15.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.1% of those under age 18 and 13.3% of those age 65 or over.[3]

Economy[edit]

Lakeview's economy has traditionally been based on agriculture, lumber, and government. Cattle ranching and hay production are important elements of the local economy. The Fremont–Winema National Forest provides timber for lumber and wood products. Because agricultural and lumber-related employment varies with the seasons, government employees of the national forest, of the Bureau of Land Management and of other agencies help stable the community's economic base. Tourism is a growing part of the economy because of the many recreational opportunities in the area around Lakeview.[7]

Lakeview is the county seat of Lake County.[38] A significant number of people in Lakeview are also employed by federal and state government agencies. In addition to government employment, Lakeview has several schools, a hospital, a sawmill, a perlite mine, and a wide range of agriculture enterprises.[39][40] According to the 2012 American Community Survey conducted by the United States Census Bureau, the largest areas of employment in Lakeview are health care (18%), public service (17%), agriculture and forestry (10%), manufacturing (9%), retail (9%), technical professions (7%), and transportation (6%).[41]

The Fremont National Forest was administratively combined with Winema National Forest in 2002. Lakeview was selected as the location for the combined Fremont–Winema National Forest headquarters. Lakeview is also the home of the Lakeview Ranger District, an administrative subdivision of the Fremont–Winema National Forest.[20][42] The Bureau of Land Management's Lakeview District is co-located with the national forest headquarters.[43] The Lakeview Interagency Fire Center is located in Lakeview. The center coordinated wildfire suppression activities between the local agencies including the United States Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, United States Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, and the Oregon Department of Forestry.[44]

The nearby Warner Creek Correctional Facility opened in 2005.[45] The prison, one of several built in Oregon to house an expanding inmate population, was opposed by many Lake County voters.[46] The minimum-security prison, 4 miles (6 km) northwest of the city, employs a staff of 100 and holds about 400 inmates.[45]

Tourism is an important part of Lakeview's economy. Lakeview markets itself as the "Tallest Town in Oregon" because of its 4,800-foot (1,500 m) elevation. It is part of the "Oregon Outback" and workings to attract tourist, sportsmen, and outdoors enthusiasts. Local attractions include fishing, birdwatching, camping, hang gliding, paragliding, hiking, rockhounding, hunting, and nature viewing.[47][48]

Since 1999, Lake County and the town of Lakeview has offered tax incentives to encourage renewable energy companies to locate in the area. Several private development projects have resulted. Iberdrola Renewables built a 26.8-megawatt biomass facility that converts sawmill waste and forest slash into power. As of 2012, that operation employed 20 people in the plant and a t least 50 more in related forest jobs. In 1912, Nevada Geothermal Power began drilling wells for a 30-megawatt geothermal power plant. The plant will add 15 jobs to the local economy.[49]

Recreation and other points of interest[edit]

In the summer, the Fremont–Winema National Forest's Lakeview District provided a number of outdoor recreation opportunities in the area around Lakeview. The Lakeview District as 22 trails open to mountain bike riders. All those trails and more are available for hiking. The national forest has a number of lakes and streams available for sport fishing. There are also camping and picnic sites located near Lakeview.[50]

In the winter, alpine skiers can enjoy their sport at Warner Canyon Ski Area. The ski hill is located in the Fremont–Winema National Forest 10 miles (16 km) northeast of Lakeview on Oregon Route 140. Snowmobiling is also a popular recreation activity during the winter months.[51]

Lakeview is known as one of the best places in North America for hang gliding and paragliding and was designated "the Hang Gliding Capital of the West" in 1991. The national championships for hang gliding were held in Lakeview in 1993, 1997, 2000, and 2008, while the national championships for paragliding were held in Lakeview in 1998 and 2007.[52] And for at least the past twenty years, Lakeview has hosted the "Umpteenth Annual Festival of Free Flight" over the Fourth of July holiday weekend, sponsored by the Lake County Chamber of Commerce, and various local businesses. This event draws pilots and families from all over the United States, as well as other countries, for hang gliding and paragliding.[53]

MC Chuck Wagon Western Heritage Exhibit

Lakeview is also known for the hot water geyser, Old Perpetual, located at Hunter's Hot Springs. The geyser sometimes go "silent" from about the first of September until around mid-October. Some people attributed this to farm irrigation during the spring and summer; others believe it may be caused by geothermal development the City of Lakeview has undertaken to supply the Warner Creek Correctional Facility with water for heating. However, the Town and the Oregon Department of Corrections deny any cause-and-effect relationship between geothermal development and the geyser's periodic dormancy. To date, there is no evidence available to identify the actual cause(s) of the geyser's dormancy.[54]

Other points of interest include:

Education[edit]

Daly Middle School in Lakeview

Lakeview High School, the only high school in the city, is part of Lakeview School District #7; serving students in grades 7 through 12. Daly Middle School, was relocated to Lakeview High School in 2012 and serves students in grades 7–8. There are two elementary schools, located across the street from each other. Fremont Elementary School houses K-3 while A.D. Hay Elementary School, considered the main building, houses grades 4–6.[62] In 2013, the former Daly Middle School building began housing the Klamath Community College, Innovative and Learning Center. The new Center is being utilized to bring KCC classes and degree programs to Lakeview, removing the obstacle of driving 100 miles (160 km) each way to attend classes.

Many students from high schools in Lake County have attended college on scholarships provided in trust by pioneer physician Bernard Daly. Known as the Bernard Daly Educational Fund, the funds have helped over 1,600 Lake County students. Daly was a medical doctor, rancher, banker and politician. He was associated with an act of frontier heroism that occurred when a fire broke out during a Christmas program at the isolated Oregon town of Silver Lake in December 1894. Rancher Ed O'Farrell rode to Lakeview some 100 miles away in sub-zero temperatures to fetch Daly. The ride took 19 hours, during which O'Farrell stopped at ranches along the way to change horses. Daly and driver William Duncan made the return trip to Silver Lake in 13 hours using a buggy. Forty-three people died in the fire, the worst in Oregon history.[63]

Transportation[edit]

Lakeview is located on U.S. Route 395 and Oregon Route 140. Oregon's Outback Scenic Byway passes through Lakeview along Highway 395. By road, the nearest incorporated towns are Klamath Falls, Oregon, 96 miles (154 km) west of Lakeview; Bend, Oregon, 175 miles (282 km) to the northwest; Burns, Oregon, 139 miles (224 km) to the northeast; Winnemucca, Nevada, 211 miles (340 km) to the east; and Alturas, California, 54 miles (87 km) south of Lakeview.[34][55]

The Lake Railroad (formerly the Lake County Railroad) is a spur line from Lakeview to Alturas, California. It provides Lakeview with freight service, but does not carry passengers. It is owned by Lake County. The railroad is currently operated by Frontier Rail. Lakeview is 96 mi (154 km) from the passenger train station in Klamath Falls, Oregon.[33]

The Lake County Airport is located 3 miles (4.8 km) southwest of the Lakeview's downtown area. It is a public airport owned by Lake County. The airport covers 1,000 acres (405 ha) and includes a single 5,318-foot (1,621 m) asphalt runway.[64][65]

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Incorporated Cities: Lakeview". Oregon Secretary of State. 2013. Retrieved 6 July 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "U.S. Gazetteer: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 6 July 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "American FactFinder". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 6 July 2013. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2 June 2013. 
  5. ^ "Lakeview". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. 28 November 1980. Retrieved 6 July 2013. 
  6. ^ "Researchers, Led by Archaeologist, Find Pre-Clovis Human DNA", Newswise, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, 3 April 2008.
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  38. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. 2013. Retrieved 6 July 2013. 
  39. ^ "Chamber Membership", Lake County Chamber of Commerce, Lakeview, Oregon, 19 July 2014.
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  47. ^ Welcome to Lake County - Oregon's Outback
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  52. ^ Cascade Paragliding: About the club
  53. ^ Festival of Free Flight, Hang Gliding and Paragliding Event, lake County Chamber of Commerce, Lakeview, Oregon, 19 July 2014.
  54. ^ Preusch, Matthew (21 February 2010). "Lakeview's Iconic Geyser Seems to Be Running Out of Steam. But Why?". The Oregonian. Retrieved 22 February 2010. 
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  56. ^ a b c d "Self Guided Tours", Lake County Chamber of Commerce, Lakeview, Oregon, 19 July 2014.
  57. ^ MC Chuck Wagon Western Heritage Exhibit, interpretive museum, Lakeview, Oregon, 16 August 2014.
  58. ^ MC Chuckwagon & Western Heritage Exhibit receives award, Lake County Examiner, Lakeview, Oregon, 28 May 2014.
  59. ^ a b c d e Oregon National Register List (PDF), Oregon Parks and Recreation Department: Salem, Oregon, 6 June 2011, p. 19.
  60. ^ "Gearhart Mountain Wilderness", Fremont–Winema National Forest, United States forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Lakeview, Oregon, 19 July 2014.
  61. ^ "Abert Rim" (PDF), The Oregon Outback Scenic Byway, National Scenic Byway Driving Guide, Oregon Department of Transportation, Salem, Oregon, 22 April 2014.
  62. ^ "Oregon School Directory 2012–13" (PDF). Oregon Department of Education. p. 42. Retrieved 6 July 2013. 
  63. ^ Cooper, Forest E. (1986). Introducing Dr. Bernard Daly. Lakeview, Oregon: Lake County Historical Society. OCLC 15192993. 
  64. ^ "Airport master Record" (PDF), Location Identification: LKV (FAA Site Number: 19491.*A), Federal Aviation Administration, United States Department of Transportation, 24 July 2014.
  65. ^ "Lake County Airport", airnav.com, AirNav LLC, Atlanta, Georgia, 29 May 2014.

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