Late Night with Seth Meyers

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Late Night with Seth Meyers
Late Night with Seth Meyers (Official 2014 Logo).png
Also known as Late Night (franchise brand)
Format
Created by Seth Meyers
Directed by Alex Vietmeier
Presented by Seth Meyers
Starring Seth Meyers
The 8G Band with Fred Armisen
Narrated by Ron McClary
Composer(s) Fred Armisen
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 80 (as of July 31, 2014) (List of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s) Lorne Michaels
Producer(s)
  • Alex Baze
  • Eric Leiderman
  • Mike Shoemaker
Location(s)
Running time 62 minutes (with commercials)
Production company(s)
Broadcast
Original channel NBC
Picture format 1080i (16:9 HDTV)
Original run February 24, 2014 (2014-02-24) – present (present)
Chronology
Preceded by
Related shows
External links
Website

Late Night with Seth Meyers is an American late-night talk show that airs at 12:37 am Eastern/11:37 pm Central on NBC in the United States, Monday through Thursday (since April, Friday shows have always been reruns). The hour-long show premiered on Monday, February 24, 2014, and is hosted by actor, comedian, and performer Seth Meyers, former head writer and long-time Weekend Update host of Saturday Night Live.

History[edit]

The fourth incarnation of the Late Night franchise, originated by David Letterman, the program originates in New York City out of Studio 8G at 30 Rockefeller Plaza.[1] Meyers was appointed host when Jimmy Fallon was announced to become the next host of The Tonight Show, where he succeeded the previous host Jay Leno on February 17, 2014. As Ron McClary proclaiming "From Studio 8G at 30 Rockefeller Plaza in New York, it's Late Night with Seth Meyers!" and announces that night’s guests and The 8G Band with Fred Armisen (Occasional appearance). Meyers' first guests were fellow SNL alum and Weekend Update co-anchor Amy Poehler, Vice President Joe Biden, and musical act A Great Big World.[2][3][4] The show's house band, "The 8G Band", features members of the indie bands Les Savy Fav and Girls Against Boys[5] and is typically led by SNL alum Fred Armisen.

Recurring sketches[edit]

  • Fred Talks: 8G Band bandleader Fred Armisen describes some ridiculous new project that he's working on, to Seth's disbelief.
  • Seth's Story: Meyers tells a story, detailing something that happened to him recently.
  • Venn Diagrams: Venn diagrams are shown that detail what two seemingly different things have in common.
  • Famous Audience Members: Meyers introduces and describes some "famous" members of his audience.
  • This Week in Numbers: Seth shares some numbers, which all are connected to jokes.
  • How They Reported It: Seth shares how several different news outlets reported the same issue.
  • Bad Men: A parody of Mad Men, with Seth portraying the Don Draper character.
  • Emergency Sidekick: Emergency sidekick Dale (portrayed by Saturday Night Live writer and former performer Tim Robinson) joins Seth for a desk piece.
  • Instagram Filters: Seth shares some comical filters for the photo-sharing app Instagram.
  • Couple Things: Seth shares his opinion in the format of a "couple things," regarding a surprising or shocking news story.
  • Extreme Dog Shaming: Seth claims that his research team has searched the Internet to find dogs who are guilty of terrible actions (to which the dogs "confess" in doctored photographs). One example, from the March 8, 2014, episode has a dog confessing, "I ate the mailman." Another example, from April, 2014: A dachshund admits, "I provided the State Department with false talking points on Benghazi." Later in the segment, Meyers's own dog confesses, "I wanted Neil Patrick Harris to host the Emmys again." (Harris hosted the Emmy Award ceremonies in 2013; Meyers is slated to host them in August, 2014.)[6]
  • Fake or Florida?: A mini-game show in which Seth reads news synopses to three audience contestants, who must decide whether these headlines have been invented by Seth's staff or describe actual incidents in Florida. Seth's alleged assistant, "Cassandra," a comically inept hostess of sorts (writer/comedian Michelle Wolf), tries to keep the camera riveted on her rather than helping the game to progress.[7][8][9]
  • Second Chance Theatre: Seth welcomes back a former Saturday Night Live cast member who performs a sketch that was once written for the show but never saw the light of day after dress rehearsal. These sketches tend to be ones written during Seth's tenure as head writer of SNL that he loved and regrets not having made it further. The guest performs the sketch with the assistance of past and present SNL cast members such as Fred Armisen and they are all introduced by Seth in a manner reminiscent of Masterpiece Theatre.
  • Back In My Day: Following a story of a recent Technological advancement Seth dons a Mr. Rodgers style cardigan and waxes nostalgia of the "good ol' days" which in reality, is only a few years ago

Episodes[edit]

Critical reception[edit]

The show has received mixed reviews. The Hollywood Reporter's Tim Goodman referred to Meyers' monologue as "staccato and hit and miss — sounding more like his "Weekend Update" bits rather than a real monologue." On the other hand, USA Today's Robert Bianco felt Meyers was "shifting the show to suit his talents," making the show stronger and more traditional than Fallon's.[10]

Reviewing the debut week, The A.V. Club gave a B grade: The show begins with, "essentially, a carbon copy of Meyers' Weekend Update / 'what's in the news' jokes, presented as a stand-up monologue to open the show... More than anything, Meyers was arguably hired because he's such a pro at delivering quippy one-liners about dumb people in Florida... Meyers will settle in to the formulaic parts of this job quickly enough — he's a pro, and it shows... There are other features, however, that offer more than a glimmer of hope. Fred Armisen is a surprising choice as bandleader, but he brings unequaled improv chops to the table, and his little banter with Seth every night has already proven one of the more reliably funny bits. Integrating him as much as possible is certainly a smart idea... Late Night With Seth Meyers is also promising to feature panel segments with fictional characters, something that's less prominent on late-night TV these days and definitely needs to come back in force."[11]

A month later, Jeff Jensen of Entertainment Weekly gave the program a B+ and wrote, "In his first week, the very smart, very smiley former Saturday Night Live head writer gave stiff monologue, which was basically his Weekend Update newsreader shtick, delivered in his shouty, wiseassy, talk-to-the-camera manner, but standing up; he improved the more he connected with the studio audience. He rolls when sitting down. Meyers seems capable of creating chemistry and having quality chats with anyone, from riding the wild waves of Kanye West to spinning a funny anecdote with pal Brad Paisley about accidentally stealing a Porsche."[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Vadala, Nick. "VIDEO: The Seth Meyers era of ‘Late Night’ has arrived in NBC's new promo video". Philly.com. Retrieved 6 January 2014. 
  2. ^ Carter, Bill (2013-05-12). "Seth Meyers to Succeed Fallon on NBC's Late Night". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved 2013-05-12. 
  3. ^ Evans, Bradford. "Here's Your 'Late Night with Seth Meyers' Writing Staff". splitsider. Retrieved 6 December 2013. 
  4. ^ Adalian, Josef. "Seth Meyers Gave Reporters a Late Night Update". Vulture. Retrieved 6 December 2013. 
  5. ^ Monez, Mindy. "Fred Armisen Is the "Late Night with Seth Meyers" Band Leader! - Blog - Late Night with Seth Meyers - NBC". NBC. Retrieved February 19, 2014. 
  6. ^ Late Night With Seth Meyers (April 30, 2014). "Extreme Dog Shaming". NBC. Retrieved May 7, 2014. 
  7. ^ Moorhouse, Drusilla (Feb 27, 2014). "Seth Meyers wins with Fake or Florida game show on Late Night". Today. Retrieved May 7, 2014. 
  8. ^ Luippold, Ross (February 27, 2014). "Seth Meyers Hosts 'Fake Or Florida?' Game Show, Proves Florida Is The Weirdest". The Huffington Post. Retrieved May 7, 2014. 
  9. ^ McMillan, Graeme (March 3, 2014). "The 10 Best Moments From Seth Meyers’ First Week on Late Night". Wired. Retrieved May 7, 2014. 
  10. ^ Brzeski, Patrick (February 25, 2014). "Seth Meyers on 'Late Night': What the Critics Are Saying". The Hollywood Reporter.
  11. ^ Sims, David (February 28, 2014). "Seth Meyers has the chops, but is that enough to get audiences to care?". The AV Club. Retrieved May 7, 2014. 
  12. ^ Jensen, Jeff (March 20, 2014). "Late Night (2014)". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved May 7, 2014. 

External links[edit]