List of subcamps of Auschwitz

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Entrance to Trzebinia, a subcamp of the Auschwitz concentration camp, 1945

The following, is the list of subcamps of the Auschwitz concentration camp run by Nazi Germany in occupied Poland during World War II. The list, supplied by the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum,[1] identifies camps of Auschwitz I, Auschwitz II (Birkenau), and Auschwitz III (Monowitz). The satellite camps were named Aussenlager (external camp), Nebenlager (extension or subcamp), and Arbeitslager (labor camp). Some of them were less than ten kilometers away from the main camps, with prisoner populations ranging from several dozen to several thousand.[1]

Subcamps of KL Auschwitz[edit]

Guarded by the SS division of the Totenkopfverbände, the known sub-camps of KL Auschwitz-Birkenau included:[2]

# Name of the subcamp Location Life time Number of prisoners Tenant
Sub-camps at livestock farms
1. Harmense (Geflügelfarm) Harmęże Dec 1941 - Jan 1945 About 150 prisoners For purposes of KL
2. Budy (Wirtschaftshof) Brzeszcze Apr 1942 - Jan 1945 700-800 prisoners For purposes of KL
3. Babitz (Wirtschaftshof) Babice near Oświęcim Mar 1943 - Jan 1945 About 340 prisoners For purposes of KL
4. Birkenau (Wirtschaftshof) Brzezinka near Oświęcim 1943 - Jan 1945 More than 200 prisoners For purposes of KL
5. Rajsko (Gärtnerei) Rajsko Jun 1944 - Jan 1945 About 300 female prisoners For purposes of KL and SS research
6. Plawy (Wirtschaftshof) Pławy Dec 1944 - Jan 1945 About 200 prisoners For purposes of KL
Sub-camps at industrial plants
7. Golleschau Goleszów Jul 1942 - Jan 1945 About 1,000 prisoners Ostdeutsche Baustoffwerke GmbH
8. Jawischowitz Jawiszowice Aug 1942 - Jan 1945 More than 2,500 prisoners Herman Göring Werke
9. Chelmek (Aussenkommando) Chełmek Oct 1942 - Dec 1942 About 150 prisoners Ota Schlesische Schuhwerke ("Bata")
10. Monowitz Buna-Werke [3] Monowice near Oświęcim Oct 1942 - Jan 1945 4,000-11,000 prisoners initially, estimated 80,000 victims by 1944 in three IG Farben locations.[3] IG Farbenindustrie
11. Eintrachthütte Świętochłowice May 1943 - Jan 1945 1,374 prisoners Berghütte
12. Neu-Dachs Jaworzno Jun 1943 - Jan 1945 More than 3,500 prisoners Energieversorgung Oberschlesien Aktiengesellschaft (EVO)
13. Fürstengrube Wesoła near Mysłowice Sep 1943 - Jan 1945 700-1,200 prisoners IG Farbenindustrie
14. Janinagrube (Gute Hoffnung) Libiąż Sep 1943 - Jan 1945 877 prisoners IG Farbenindustrie
15. Lagischa Łagisza Sep 1943 - Sep 1944 About 1,000 prisoners Energie-Versorgung Oberschlesien AG
16. Günthergrube Lędziny Feb 1944 - Jan 1945 300-600 prisoners IG Farbenindustrie
17. Gleiwitz I Gliwice Mar 1944 - Jan 1945 About 1,300 prisoners Reichsbahnausbesserungswerk
18. Laurahütte Siemianowice Śląskie Mar/Apr 1944 - Jan 1945 1,000 prisoners Rheenmetall Borsig AG
19. Blechhammer Sławięcice near Blachownia Śląska Apr 1944 - Jan 1945 609 prisoners O/S Hydrierwerke AG
20. Bobrek Bobrek near Oświęcim May 1944 - Jan 1945 About 50-213 prisoners and about 50 female prisoners Siemens-Schuckert
21. Gleiwitz II Gliwice May 1944 - Jan 1945 More than 1,000 prisoners Deutsche Gasrusswerke
22. Sosnowitz II Sosnowiec [4] May 1944 - Jan 1945 About 900 prisoners Ost Maschinenbau GmbH (Berghüte)
23. Gleiwitz III Gliwice Jul 1944 - Jan 1945 450-600 prisoners Zieleniewski - Maschinen und Waggonbau GmbH - Krakau
24. Hindenburg Zabrze Aug 1944 - Jan 1945 About 400-500 female prisoners and about 70 prisoners Vereinigte Oberschlesische Hüttenwerke AG (Oberhütten)
25. Trzebinia Trzebionka near Trzebinia Aug 1944 - Jan 1945 600-800 prisoners Erdölrafinerie Trzebinia GmbH
26. Tschechowitz (Bombensucherkommando) Czechowice-Dziedzice Aug 1944 - Sep 1944 About 100 prisoners Reischsbahn
27. Althammer Stara Kuźnia near Halemby, nowadays Ruda Śląska Sep 1944 - Jan 1945 About 500 prisoners
28. Bismarckhütte Chorzów Sep 1944 - Jan 1945 About 200 prisoners Berghütte
29. Charlottengrube Rydułtowy Sep 1944 - Jan 1945 About 1,000 prisoners Hermann Göring Werke
30. Neustadt Prudnik Sep 1944 - Jan 1945 About 400 female prisoners Schlesische Feinweberei AG
31. Tschechowitz-Vacuum Czechowice-Dziedzice Sep 1944 - Jan 1945 About 600 prisoners
32. Hubertushütte Łagiewniki Dec 1944 - Jan 1945 200 prisoners Berghütte-Königs und Birmarckhütte AG
33. Freudenthal Bruntal 1944 - Jan 1945 About 300 female prisoners Emmerich Machold
34. Lichtewerden Světlá (nowadays Czech Republic) Nov 1944 - Jan 1945 About 300 female prisoners G.A. Buhl und Sohn
Sub-camps with various functions
35. Sosnitz Sośnica near Gliwice Jul 1940 - Aug 1940 About 30 prisoners For purposes of KL
36. Porombka (SS-Hütte) Międzybrodzie Bialskie Oct/Nov 1940 - Jan 1945 About 50 prisoners and about 10 female prisoners For purposes of SS
37. Altdorf Stara Wieś near Pszczyna Oct 1942 - 1943 About 20 prisoners Oberforestamt Pless
38. Radostowitz Radostowice near Pszczyna 1942 - 1943 About 20 prisoners Oberforestamt Pless
39. Kobier (Aussenkommando) Kobiór 1942 - Sep 1943 About 150 prisoners Oberforestamt Pless
40. Brünn Brno Oct 1943 - Apr 1945 250-150 prisoners For purposes of SS
41. Sosnowitz (I) Sosnowiec Aug 1943 - Feb 1944 About 100 prisoners
42. Gleiwitz IV Gliwice Jun 1944 - Jan 1945 About 500 prisoners For purposes of SS
43. Kattowitz (Sonderkommando) Katowice Jan 1944 - Jan 1945 10 prisoners Gestapo
44. Bauzug (2 SS) Karlsruhe, after Stuttgart Sep 1944 - Oct 1944 About 500 prisoners living in a train SS-WVHA

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum (2014), Podobozy KL Auschwitz (Subcamps of KL Auschwitz). Retrieved 6 June 2014.
  2. ^ J Mayer (20 Feb 2011). "Subcamps from KL Auschwitz". Der Ort des Terrors - Geschichte der nationalsozialistischen Konzentrationslager. Band 5. Axis History. Retrieved 17 July 2014. 
  3. ^ a b John F. Ptak (September 23, 2008), Distinguishing Oświęcim (town), Auschwitz I, II, & III, and the Buna Werke. From the “Pamphlet Collection” of the Library of Congress.
  4. ^ Prof. Stuart Stein: "Affidavit of Dieter Wisliceny", from Nazi Conspiracy and Aggression, Volume VIII. USGPO, Washington, 1946, pages 606–619. Note: SS-Hauptsturmführer Dieter Wisliceny in his testimony given before the International Military Tribunal at Nurnberg, 3 January 1946, erroneously identifies the Auschwitz concentration camp complex as the concentration area Sosnowitz (which was one of its dozens of subcamps).