Los Angeles mayoral election, 2009

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Los Angeles mayoral election, 2009
Los Angeles
2005 ←
March 3, 2009 (2009-03-03)
→ 2013

Turnout 17.90%
  Antonio Villaraigosa portrait.jpg
Candidate Antonio Villaraigosa Walter Moore
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 152,613 71,937
Percentage 55.65% 26.23%

Mayor before election

Antonio Villaraigosa
Democratic

Elected Mayor

Antonio Villaraigosa
Democratic

The 2009 election for Mayor of Los Angeles took place on March 3, 2009. Incumbent mayor Antonio R. Villaraigosa was re-elected overwhelming and faced no serious opponent. Since Los Angeles holds nonpartisan elections, there was no Democratic or Republican primary. Villaraigosa would have faced a run-off against second place-finisher Walter Moore had he failed to win a majority of the vote.

Villaraigosa won the election despite having generally unfavorable approval ratings. He was credited with winning because more well-known and better-funded candidates, such as developer Rick Caruso, declined to run.

Results[edit]

Los Angeles mayoral general election, March 3, 2009[1][2][3]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Antonio Villaraigosa 152,613 55.65% +22.55%
Republican Walter Moore[4] 71,937 26.23% +23.46%
Independent Gordon Turner 17,554 6.40%
Independent David "Zuma Dogg" Saltzburg 9,115 3.32%
Independent Stevan Torres 9,114 3.31%
Republican David R. Hernandez 5,225 1.91%
Independent Craig X. Rubin 4,158 1.51%
Party for Socialism and Liberation Carlos Alvarez 3,047 1.11%
Socialist Workers James Harris 2,461 0.90%
Republican Phil Jennerjahn 2,432 0.89%
Total votes 274,233 100.00%
Turnout 285,658 17.90% -10.63%
Registered electors 1,596,165
Democratic hold Swing

References and footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "City of Los Angeles Primary Nominating & Consolidated Elections Official Election Results March 3, 2009". Office of the City Clerk, City of Los Angeles. March 3, 2009. p. 2. 
  2. ^ "Los Angeles Mayor". Our Campaigns. 
  3. ^ Officially all candidates are non-partisan.
  4. ^ Although Walter Moore is often listed as a Republican, he insists he is an independent.

External links[edit]