NAIA Football National Championship

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The National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics Football National Championship is decided by a post-season playoff system featuring the best NAIA college football teams in the United States. Under sponsorship of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, the championship game has been played annually since 1956.[1] In 1970, NAIA football was divided into two divisions, Division I and Division II, with a championship game played in each division. In 1997, NAIA football was again consolidated into one division. The game is currently played at Barron Stadium in Rome, Georgia.[2]

Champions by year[edit]

Over the years, the NAIA championship games were played under a variety of names:

Date Champion Score Defeated Site
December 22, 1956 Montana State
Saint Joseph's (IN)
0–01 Little Rock, Arkansas
December 21, 1957 Pittsburg State 27–26 Hillsdale Saint Petersburg, Florida
December 20, 1958 Northeastern State 19–13 Arizona State-Flagstaff Saint Petersburg, Florida
December 19, 1959 Texas A&I 20–7 Lenoir-Rhyne Saint Petersburg, Florida
December 10, 1960 Lenoir-Rhyne 15–14 Humboldt State Saint Petersburg, Florida
December 9, 1961 Pittsburg State 12–7 Linfield Sacramento, California
December 8, 1962 Central State 28–13 Lenoir-Rhyne Sacramento, California
December 14, 1963 Saint John’s 33–27 Prairie View A&M Sacramento, California
1964 Concordia-Moorhead
Sam Houston State
7–71 Augusta, Georgia
December 11, 1965 Saint John’s 33–0 Linfield Augusta, Georgia
1966 Waynesburg 42–21 Wisconsin–Whitewater Tulsa, Oklahoma
December 9, 1967 Fairmont State 28–21 Eastern Washington Morgantown, West Virginia
December 14, 1968 Troy State 43–35 Texas A&I Montgomery, Alabama
December 13, 1969 Texas A&I 32–7 Concordia-Moorhead Kingsville, Texas
December 12, 1970–I Texas A&I 48–7 Wofford Greenville, South Carolina
1970–II Westminster 21–16 Anderson New Castle, Pennsylvania
December 11, 1971–I Livingston 14–12 Arkansas Tech Birmingham, Alabama
1971–II California Lutheran 30–14 Westminster Thousand Oaks, California
1972-I East Texas State 21–18 Carson-Newman Commerce, Texas
1972–II Missouri Southern 21–14 Northwestern (IA) Joplin, Missouri
December 8, 1973–I Abilene Christian 42–14 Elon Shreveport, Louisiana
1973–II Northwestern (IA) 10–3 Glenville State Huntington, West Virginia
December 14, 1974–I Texas A&I 34–23 Henderson State Kingsville, Texas
1974–II Texas Lutheran 42–0 Missouri Valley Seguin, Texas
December 13, 1975–I Texas A&I 37–0 Salem Kingsville, Texas
1975–II Texas Lutheran 34–8 California Lutheran Thousand Oaks, California
December 11, 1976–I Texas A&I 26–0 Central Arkansas Kingsville, Texas
1976–II Westminster 20–13 Redlands Redlands, California
1977-I Abilene Christian 24–7 Southwestern Oklahoma Seattle, Washington
1977–II Westminster 17–9 California Lutheran Thousand Oaks, California
December 16, 1978–I Angelo State 34–14 Elon McAllen, Texas
1978–II Concordia-Moorhead 7–0 Findlay Findlay, Ohio
December 15, 1979–I Texas A&I 20–14 Central Oklahoma McAllen, Texas
1979–II Findlay 51–6 Northwestern (IA) Findlay, Ohio
December 20, 1980–I Elon 17–10 Northeastern State Burlington, North Carolina
1980–II Pacific Lutheran 38–10 Wilmington Tacoma, Washington
December 19, 1981–I Elon 3–0 Pittsburg State Burlington, North Carolina
1981–II Austin
Concordia-Moorhead
24–241 Sherman, Texas
1982-I Central State (OK) 14–11 Mesa State Edmond, Oklahoma
1982–II Linfield 33–15 William Jewell McMinnville, Oregon
December 17, 1983–I Carson-Newman 36–28 Mesa State Grand Junction, Colorado
1983–II Northwestern (IA) 25–21 Pacific Lutheran Tacoma, Washington
December 15, 1984–I Carson-Newman
Central Arkansas
19–191 Conway, Arkansas
1984–II Linfield 33–22 Northwestern (IA) McMinnville, Oregon
December 21, 1985–I Hillsdale
Central Arkansas
10–101 Conway, Arkansas
1985–II Wisconsin–La Crosse 24–7 Pacific Lutheran Tacoma, Washington
December 20, 1986–I Carson-Newman 17–0 Cameron Jefferson City, Tennessee
1986–II Linfield 17–0 Baker McMinnville, Oregon
December 19, 1987–I Cameron 30–2 Carson-Newman Lawton, Oklahoma
1987–II Pacific Lutheran
Vacant
2 Tacoma, Washington
December 17, 1988–I Carson-Newman 56–21 Adams State Jefferson City, Tennessee
1988–II Westminster 21–14 Wisconsin–La Crosse New Wilmington, Pennsylvania
December 16, 1989–I Carson-Newman 34–20 Emporia State Jefferson City, Tennessee
1989–II Westminster 51–30 Wisconsin–La Crosse Canton, Ohio
December 8, 1990–I Central State (OH) 38–16 Mesa State Grand Junction, Colorado
1990–II Peru State 17–7 Westminster Omaha, Nebraska
December 14, 1991–I Central Arkansas 19–16 Central State (OH) Wilberforce, Ohio
1991–II Georgetown (KY) 28–20 Pacific Lutheran Georgetown, Kentucky
December 12, 1992–I Central State (OH) 19–16 Gardner-Webb Boiling Springs, North Carolina
1992–II Findlay 26–13 Linfield Portland, Oregon
December 11, 1993–I East Central 49–35 Glenville State Ada, Oklahoma
1993–II Pacific Lutheran 50–20 Westminster Portland, Oregon
December 10, 1994–I Northeastern State 13–12 Arkansas-Pine Bluff Pine Bluff, Arkansas
1994–II Westminster 27–7 Pacific Lutheran Portland, Oregon
December 2, 1995–I Central State (OH) 37–7 Northeastern State Tahlequah, Oklahoma
1995–II Central Washington
Findlay
21–21 1 Tacoma, Washington
December 7, 1996–I Southwestern Oklahoma 33–31 Montana Tech Weatherford, Oklahoma
1996–II Sioux Falls 47–25 Western Washington Savannah, Tennessee
1997 Findlay 14–7 Willamette Savannah, Tennessee
1998 Azusa Pacific 17–14 Olivet Nazarene Savannah, Tennessee
1999 Northwestern Oklahoma State 34–26 Georgetown (KY) Savannah, Tennessee
2000 Georgetown (KY) 20–0 Northwestern Oklahoma State Savannah, Tennessee
2001 Georgetown (KY) 49–27 Sioux Falls Savannah, Tennessee
2002 Carroll 28–7 Georgetown (KY) Savannah, Tennessee
2003 Carroll 41–28 Northwestern Oklahoma State Savannah, Tennessee
2004 Carroll 15–13 Saint Francis (IN) Savannah, Tennessee
2005 Carroll 27–10 Saint Francis (IN) Savannah, Tennessee
2006 Sioux Falls 23–19 Saint Francis (IN) Savannah, Tennessee
2007 Carroll 17–9 Sioux Falls Savannah, Tennessee
2008 Sioux Falls 23–7 Carroll Rome, Georgia
2009 Sioux Falls 25–22 Lindenwood Rome, Georgia
2010 Carroll 10–7 Sioux Falls Rome, Georgia
2011 Saint Xavier 24–20 Carroll Rome, Georgia
2012 Marian 30–27 (OT) Morningside Rome, Georgia
2013 Grand View 35–23 Cumberlands Rome, Georgia

1 Game ended in a tie and teams are co champions.

2 Pacific Lutheran (WA) and the University of Wisconsin–Stevens Point played to a 16–16 tie in the championship game. Wisconsin–Stevens Point forfeited its entire 1987 schedule because of the use of an ineligible student-athlete. Pacific Lutheran is considered a co-champion with the other position vacated.

Championships by school[edit]

Team Championships Winning years
Texas A&I 7 1959, 1969, 1970, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1979
Carroll 6 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2010
Westminster 6 1970, 1976, 1977, 1988, 1989, 1994
Carson-Newman 5 1983, 1984, 1986, 1988, 1989
Findlay 4 1979, 1992, 1995, 1997
Sioux Falls 4 1996, 2006, 2008, 2009
Central Arkansas 3 1984, 1985, 1991
Central State (OH) 3 1990, 1992, 1995
Concordia-Moorhead 3 1964, 1978, 1981
Georgetown (KY) 3 1991, 2000, 2001
Linfield 3 1982, 1984, 1986
Pacific Lutheran 3 1980, 1987, 1993
Abilene Christian 2 1973, 1977
Central State (OK) 2 1962, 1982
Elon 2 1980, 1981
Northeastern State 2 1958, 1994
Northwestern (IA) 2 1973, 1983
Pittsburg State 2 1957, 1961
Saint John's 2 1963, 1965
Texas Lutheran 2 1974, 1975
Angelo State 1 1978
Austin 1 1981
Azusa Pacific 1 1998
California Lutheran 1 1971
Cameron 1 1987
Central Washington 1 1995
East Central 1 1993
East Texas State 1 1972
Fairmont State 1 1967
Grand View 1 2013
Hillsdale 1 1985
Lenoir-Rhyne 1 1960
Livingston 1 1971
Marian 1 2012
Missouri Southern 1 1972
Montana State 1 1956
Northwestern Oklahoma 1 1999
Peru State 1 1990
Sam Houston State 1 1964
Saint Xavier 1 2011
Saint Joseph's (IN) 1 1956
Southwestern Oklahoma 1 1996
Waynesburg 1 1966
Wisconsin–La Crosse 1 1985
Vacated 1 1987

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ NAIA Football Championship History. National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. Retrieved 2008-04-07. 
  2. ^ "2008 NAIA Football Championship Series". Retrieved 2008-04-07.