Old Serbia

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Old Serbia and Macedonia in 1913 (green)

Old Serbia (Serbian: Стара Србија/Stara Srbija) is a term[1] used for the territory which was the core of medieval Serbia.[2][page needed] It included the regions of Raška, Kosovo and Metohija and the northwestern part of Macedonia.[3] The Serb population of this territory was referred to as Old–Serbians (Serbian: Старосрбијан).[4][page needed][5][page needed]

Etymology[edit]

Vuk Stefanović Karadžić referred to "Old Serbia" as the territory of the Serbian people, that was part of medieval Serbia prior to the Ottoman conquest.[citation needed] The term originated in Serbian common speech and was introduced by the refugees of the Great Serb Migrations[6] who lived in Austro-Hungarian regions of Serbs. It re-emerged in the aspirations of liberating these areas during the time of the Serbian revolution and later would designate the areas not liberated by 1833 and 1878.

History[edit]

In May 1877 a delegation of Serbs of Old Serbia presented their request to the government of Serbia to 'liberate' and unite Old Serbia with the Principality of Serbia.[7] They also informed representatives of the Great Powers and Emperor of Russia about their demands.[7] In the same year the Committee for the Liberation of Old Serbia and Macedonia was founded.[8] In the 1877 peace after the Serbo-Turkish War, the Serbs hoped to gain the Kosovo Vilayet and Sanjak of Novi Pazar to the Lim river.[9] However, the Treaty of San Stefano came as a shock, as they only received the small territory of Niš, Pirot and Vranje (ca. 200 square miles), which was smaller than the territory received by the Principality of Montenegro.[9] In 1913 the Sandžak, Kosovo and Metohija and Vardar Macedonia became part of the Kingdom of Serbia.

Legacy[edit]

The "Old Serbia" bank opened in Skopje in 1923 to dominate and accelerate the economy of the region.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Milovan Radovanović (2004). Etnički i demografski procesi na Kosovu i Metohiji. Liber Press. p. 33. 
  2. ^ Jevto Dedijer. Stara Srbija. 
  3. ^ Ivo Banač (1988). The National Question in Yugoslavia: Origins, History, Politics. Cornell University Press. p. 38. ISBN 0801494931. 
  4. ^ Georgina Mary Sebright (lady.); Adelina Paulina Irby (1877). Travels in the Slavonic provinces [&c.].. Retrieved 21 May 2013. 
  5. ^ Michael W. Evanoff (1986). St. John St: A Remembrance : an Ethnic Feature of The St. John St. Community, Flint, Michigan, 1874-1974. Edelweiss Press. Retrieved 21 May 2013. 
  6. ^ Milovan Radovanović (2004). Etnički i demografski procesi na Kosovu i Metohiji. Liber Press. p. 38. 
  7. ^ a b Stojan Novaković; Andrej Mitrović (1996). Stojanu Novakoviću u spomen: o osamdesetogodišnjici smrti. Srpska književna zadruga. p. 68. Retrieved 21 May 2013. "Представници Ста- росрбијанаца, које су предводили јеромонах дечански Сава, Тодор Станковић из Ниша и Деспот Баџовић из Крушева, дошли су у мају 1877. у Београд с представком за српску владу којом су тражили ослобођење и уједињење Старе Србије са Кнежевином Србијом." 
  8. ^ Dragoslav Srejović; Slavko Gavrilović; Sima M. Ćirković (1983). Istorija srpskog naroda: knj. Od Berlinskog kongresa do Ujedinjenja 1878-1918 (2 v.). Srpska književna zadruga. p. 291. Retrieved 21 May 2013. 
  9. ^ a b Barbara Jelavich (1983). History of the Balkans: Twentieth Century 2. Cambridge University Press. p. 29. ISBN 0521274591. 
  10. ^ http://scindeks.nb.rs/article.aspx?artid=1450-84869901123S.  Missing or empty |title= (help)