Pakistan Aeronautical Complex

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Pakistan Aeronautical Complex
Type SOE, Mil
Founded 1971
Headquarters Kamra, Punjab, Pakistan
Key people Air Mrshl Javaid Ahmed
Chairman
Products
Services Aircraft maintenance
Aircraft MLU systems
Aircraft design, R&D
Owners Pakistan Air Force
(Primary owner)
Pakistan Armed Forces
(Other ownership)
Divisions
Subsidiaries Air Weapons Complex
Website pac.org.pk

The Pakistan Aeronautical Complex, (or PAC), is a major aerospace, defence, aviation contractor, and military corporation producing aerial systems for both military and civilian usage.[1]

Founded in 1971 by the Pakistan Air Force (PAF), the PAC designs, develops, and build aircraft and avionics systems for the Inter–Services of the country; it also provides its services for civilian aircraft.[2] In addition, the PAC performs local maintenance and works on the aircraft MLU systems of foreign-built military and civilian aircraft. It is solely owned by the PAF as its corporate interests and its corporate appointments are directly made by the Chief of air staff from the Air HQ of the PAF.[2]

Mainly focusing on avionics, aviation, and high-tech electronics, the PAEC also manufactures military systems for army and navy, which are listed as "valued customers".[3] Many of these products are specially suited for the Pakistan Armed Forces (IDF) needs, while others are also marketed to foreign militaries. While it collaborated with several countries corporate organizations, the PAC often jointly works with the Turkish TAI and the Chinese CATIC.[4]

Operations[edit]

The Pakistan Aeronautical Complex started with three main Ministry of Defence projects designated P-721, P-741 and P-751. The first two digits show the year of project approval and launch, the third digit is a serial designator.

A retired Pakistan Air Force F-6 on display

Aircraft Rebuild Factory[edit]

Aircraft Rebuild Factory (ARF), formerly known as F-6 Rebuild Factory(F-6RF) and P-721, is primarily dedicated to the overhaul and parts manufacture of Chinese aircraft in service with the Pakistan Air force (PAF). The factory is capable of overhauling and parts manufacturing for the Shenyang F-6 (now retired by the PAF), Nanchang A-5 (also retired by the PAF) and F-7 combat aircraft, as well as the Shenyang FT-5 and FT-6 jet trainer aircraft. ARF is also capable of manufacturing Drop Tanks and harnesses of aircraft.

Mirage Rebuild Factory[edit]

The Mirage Rebuild Factory (MRF), formerly known as P-741, is dedicated to the overhaul of French origin military aircraft in service with the Pakistan Air Force (PAF), the Dassault Mirage III and Mirage V combat aircraft. Overhaul and manufacturing services were utilized by other countries with French Mirage aircraft in service. This factory also grew to service and overhaul the Pratt & Whitney F100 turbofan engines belonging to the F-16 Fighting Falcon combat aircraft of the PAF.

Aircraft Manufacturing Factory[edit]

Two JF-17 multi-role fighters during a flypast performance in Islamabad on 23 March 2007, assembled by PAC earlier that month. Serial production of the fighter at AMF began on 30 June 2009.
An MFI-395 Super Mushshak, produced at AMF, on display at the IDEAS 2008 defence exhibition in Karachi, Pakistan.

Aircraft Manufacturing Factory (AMF), formerly known as P-751, is dedicated to heavy military aircraft manufacturing. The MFI-17 Mushshak basic trainer aircraft built under license for use by the Pakistan Air Force (PAF) and Pakistan Army aviation wing. This factory project managed the aircraft modification and development venture that resulted in the MFI-395 Super Mushshak basic trainer, based on the MFI-17 Mushshak. Development of the K-8 Karakorum (also known as Hongdu JL-8) intermediate/advanced jet trainer was done in cooperation with Hongdu Aviation Industry Group of China, with AMF manufacturing parts for the aircraft. The JF-17 multi-role combat aircraft (also known as FC-1), a joint project between China and Pakistan, is now being manufactured by AMF. The MFI-17, MFI-395, K-8 and JF-17 are now in service with the (PAF). AMF also designs and manufactures unmanned aerial vehicles for uses such as target practice.

Manufacture of sub-assemblies for the JF-17 light-weight multi-role fighter began on 22 January 2008, while serial production of the fighter began on 30 June 2009.

On August 20, 2009 the PAF announced that it would begin production of its own unmanned aerial vehicles in collaboration with Italian company Selex Galileo. Production of the UAV, named Falco, was to begin soon.[5]

An earlier opportunity to manufacture a fighter aircraft was lost when the Pakistan Air Force abandoned Project Sabre II in 1987, a joint effort by Pakistan, China and Grumman Aerospace that would have seen AMF manufacturing a re-designed Chengdu F-7 variant.

Avionics Production Factory (APF)[edit]

Avionics production Factory (APF), formerly known as Kamra Avionics and Radar Factory (KARF) was initiated as Radar Maintenance Centre (RMC) in 1983 to overhaul and rebuild ground-based radar systems. In 1989, RMC was expanded to become Kamra Radar & Avionics Factory (KARF). APF has the facilities to assemble and overhaul airborne as well as ground-based radar systems, electronics and avionics. Currently the only ISO 9002 certified facility among PAC, the factory was involved in upgrading the Pakistan Air Force (PAF) Chengdu F-7P interceptor fleet by replacing the original Italian built FIAR Grifo-7 radar with the more capable FIAR Grifo-7 mk-II radar, which was assembled under licence by APF. More recently, radar production involved the license assembly of the latest upgrade variant of the FIAR Grifo-7, the Grifo-7MG radar, which arms the Chengdu F-7PG combat aircraft of the PAF. In mid-2009 it was reported that APF personnel had completed training on printed circuit board assembly machines supplied by U.S. company APS Novastar, which would be used to make circuit boards for combat aircraft avionics.[6]

As PAC’s capabilities become competitive in the region, commercial ventures from national and international companies are also being undertaken.

Production history[edit]

The new JF-17 multi-role fighter, displayed at the IDEAS 2008 Defense Exhibition in Karachi, Pakistan and currently under production by PAC

Aircraft[edit]

Aircraft parts[edit]

Aircraft maintenance components[edit]

Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV)[edit]

  • Ubabeel Aerial Drone - A small arms target designed for target practice use by operators of small arms, machine guns. Also used to train operators for the larger and faster Baaz Aerial Drone. Can be very effective for recce missions.[7]
  • Baaz Aerial Drone - A recoverable aerial target designed for use with air defence guns and surface-to-air missile (SAM) systems. It has a very high rate of accuracy[8]

Consumer Electronics[edit]

The PAC n-book 1[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Histroy of PAC". Histroy of PAC. Retrieved 28 November 2014. 
  2. ^ a b Introduction of PAC. "Introduction of PAC". Introduction of PAC. Retrieved 28 November 2014. 
  3. ^ "Customers of PAC". Customers of PAC. Retrieved 28 November 2014. 
  4. ^ PAC. "Collaboration". PAC collaboration. Retrieved 28 November 2014. 
  5. ^ Malik, Sajjad (2009-08-21). "Pak version of drones ‘whirrs’ into production". Daily Times. Retrieved 2009-08-21. 
  6. ^ http://www.macalliance.com/APS%20Novastar%20on%20a%20circuit%20in%20Pakistan.pdf
  7. ^ [1][dead link]
  8. ^ [2][dead link]
  9. ^ "Pakistan Air Force Begins Production of Falco UAV". Airforce Technology. Retrieved 2013-05-03. 
  10. ^ "Pakistan to begin co-production of Falco UAV". Flightglobal.com. 2009-08-26. Retrieved 2013-05-03. 
  11. ^ Brummitt, Chris. "Guns and Androids: Pakistan Air Force Making iPads." Associated Press. February 17, 2012.
  12. ^ http://www.cpmc.pk/products/pac-ebook-1/
  13. ^ http://www.cpmc.pk/products/pac-nbook-1/

External links[edit]