Provencher

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This article is about the electoral district in Canadian province of Manitoba. For other uses, see Provenchère.
Provencher
Flag of Manitoba.svg Manitoba electoral district
Provencher riding.png
Provencher in relation to other Manitoba federal electoral districts
Federal electoral district
Legislature House of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Ted Falk
Conservative
District created 1871
First contested 1871
Last contested 2011
District webpage profile, map
Demographics
Population (2011)[1] 98,463
Electors (2011) 62,392
Area (km²)[2] 22,066.77
Pop. density (per km²) 4.5
Census divisions Division No. 1, Division No. 2, Division No. 3, Division No. 12, Division No. 19
Census subdivisions Alexander, Buffalo Point 36, De Salaberry, Division No. 1, Unorganized, Division No. 19, Unorganized, Emerson, Franklin, Hanover, La Broquerie, Lac du Bonet (RM), Lac du Bonnet (town), Montcalm, Morris (town), Morris (RM), Niverville, Pinawa, Piney, Powerview-Pine Falls, Reynolds, Ritchot, Roseau River 2, Roseau Rapids 2A, Shoal Lake (Part) 40, Springfield, Ste. Anne (RM), Ste. Anne (town), Steinbach, St-Pierre-Jolys, Stuartburn, Taché

Provencher is a federal electoral district in Manitoba, Canada, that has been represented in the House of Commons of Canada since 1871. It is primarily a rural district. Its largest community is the city of Steinbach.

Geography[edit]

The district is in the most southeastern part of Manitoba.

Demographics[edit]

According to the Canada 2011 Census

Ethnic groups: 85.3% White, 12.3% Aboriginal
Languages: 67.7% English, 17.3% German, 10.5% French, 1.2% Russian, 1.1% Ukrainian
Religions: 79.6% Christian (35.8% "Other Christian", 23.6% Catholic, 6.3% United Church, 4.8% Lutheran, 2.5% Anglican, 2.2% Baptist), 19.5% None.
Median income: $29,184 (2010)[3]
Average income: $36,186 (2010) [4]

History[edit]

The electoral district was created in 1871 after Manitoba joined the Canadian Confederation in 1870. It is notable for being the district that elected Louis Riel to the House of Commons.

This constituency has recently been considered relatively safe for Conservative members. The riding elected Liberal Party of Canada MPs from 1904–1957, and intermittently since then, including as recently as 1993–2000.

Members of Parliament[edit]

This riding has elected the following Members of Parliament:

Parliament Years Member Party
Provencher
1st  1871 − 1872     Pierre Delorme Conservative
2nd  1872 − 1873     George-Étienne Cartier Liberal–Conservative
 1873 − 1874     Louis Riel Independent
3rd  1874 − 1875
 1875 − 1878     Andrew Bannatyne Liberal
4th  1878 − 1879     Joseph Dubuc Conservative
 1879 − 1882     Joseph Royal Conservative
5th  1882 − 1887
6th  1887 − 1889
 1889 − 1891     Alphonse Alfred Clément Larivière Conservative
7th  1891 − 1896
8th  1896 − 1900
9th  1900 − 1904
10th  1904 − 1908     Joseph Ernest Cyr Liberal
11th  1908 − 1911     John Patrick Molloy Liberal
12th  1911 − 1917
13th  1917 − 1921
14th  1921 − 1925     Arthur-Lucien Beaubien Liberal
15th  1925 − 1926     Progressive
16th  1926 − 1930     Liberal–Progressive
17th  1930 − 1935
18th  1935 − 1940     Liberal
19th  1940 − 1945     René Jutras Liberal
20th  1945 − 1949
21st  1949 − 1953
22nd  1953 − 1957
23rd  1957 − 1958     Warner Jorgenson Progressive Conservative
24th  1958 − 1962
25th  1962 − 1963
26th  1963 − 1965
27th  1965 − 1968
28th  1968 − 1972     Mark Smerchanski Liberal
29th  1972 − 1974     Jake Epp Progressive Conservative
30th  1974 − 1979
31st  1979 − 1980
32nd  1980 − 1984
33rd  1984 − 1988
34th  1988 − 1993
35th  1993 − 1997     David Iftody Liberal
36th  1997 − 2000
37th  2000 − 2003     Vic Toews Alliance
 2003 − 2004     Conservative
38th  2004 − 2006
39th  2006 − 2008
40th  2008 − 2011
41st  2011 − 2013
 2013 − Present     Ted Falk Conservative

Election results[edit]

Canadian federal by-election, November 25, 2013
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative Ted Falk 13,046 58.20 -12.40 $ 83,542.19
Liberal Terry Hayward 6,711 29.94 +23.23 66,455.27
New Democratic Natalie Courcelles Beaudry 1,843 8.22 -9.67 17,878.16
Green Janine Gibson 817 3.64 +0.69 1,074.97
Total valid votes/Expense limit 22,417 100.0   –   $ 97,453.98
Total rejected ballots 136 0.60 +0.17
Turnout 22,553 33.85 -27.88
Eligible voters 66,624    
Conservative hold Swing -17.86
By-election due to the resignation of Vic Toews.

Minister of Public Safety Vic Toews resigned from cabinet and as an MP, effective July 9, 2013, to spend more time with his family and join the private sector. [5]

Canadian federal election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative Vic Toews 27,820 70.60 +5.95 $70,719.84
New Democratic Al Mackling 7,051 17.89 +4.17 $14,274.04
Liberal Terry Hayward 2,645 6.71 -5.86 $25,938.56
Green Janine Gibson 1,164 2.95 -2.84 $210.00
Christian Heritage David Reimer 510 1.29 -1.95 $8,372.94
Pirate Ric Lim[6] 215 0.55 –  $393.24
Total valid votes/Expense limit 39,405 100.0   –   $ 90,198.71
Total rejected ballots 169 0.43 -0.00
Turnout 39,574 61.73 +5.63
Eligible voters 64,104    
Conservative hold Swing +0.89
Canadian federal election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative Vic Toews 23,303 64.65 -1.03 $67,419
New Democratic Ross Martin 4,947 13.72 +0.01 $6,406
Liberal Shirley Hiebert 4,531 12.57 -3.27 $16,369
Green Janine Gibson 2,089 5.79 +1.02 $1,093
Christian Heritage David Reimer 1,170 3.24 $10,130
Total valid votes/Expense limit 36,040 100.0   –   $87,213
Total rejected ballots 156 0.43 +0.02
Turnout 36,196 58.01 -7.04


Canadian federal election, 2006: Provencher
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
     Conservative Vic Toews 25,199 65.68 +2.66 $40,862.19
Liberal Wes Penner 6,077 15.84 -9.08 $75,239.46
     New Democratic Party Patrick O'Connor 5,259 13.71 +4.70 $2,266.71
Green Janine Gibson 1,830 4.77 +1.72 $87.31
Total valid votes 38,365 100.00
Total rejected ballots 157 0.41 -0.02
Turnout 38,522 65.05 +5.38
Electors on the lists 59,216
Sources: Official Results, Elections Canada and Financial Returns, Elections Canada.


Canadian federal election, 2004: Provencher
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
     Conservative Vic Toews 22,694 63.02 +4.99 $70,851.00
Liberal Peter Epp 8,975 24.92 -10.94 $64,895.23
     New Democratic Party Sarah Zaharia 3,244 9.01 +2.90 $1,472.79
Green Janine Gibson 1,100 3.05 $480.59
Total valid votes 36,013 100.00
Total rejected ballots 155 0.43 +0.07
Turnout 36,168 59.67 -10.36
Electors on the lists 60,617
Percentage change figures are factored for redistribution. Conservative Party percentages are contrasted with the combined Canadian Alliance and Progressive Conservative percentages from 2000.
Sources: Official Results, Elections Canada and Financial Returns, Elections Canada.

Note: Conservative vote is compared to the total of the Canadian Alliance vote and Progressive Conservative vote in 2000 election.


Canadian federal election, 2000: Provencher
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
     Canadian Alliance Vic Toews 21,358 52.76 +17.68 $65,896.75
Liberal David Iftody 14,419 35.62 -4.38 $60,917.43
     Progressive Conservative Henry C. Dyck 2,726 6.73 -9.59 $7,780.05
     New Democratic Party Peter Hiebert 1,980 4.89 -3.71 $210.45
Total valid votes 40,483 100.00
Total rejected ballots 148 0.36 -0.10
Turnout 40,631 70.03 +5.09
Electors on the lists 58,020
Sources: Official Results, Elections Canada and Financial Returns, Elections Canada.

Note: Canadian Alliance vote is compared to the Reform vote in 1997 election.


Canadian federal election, 1997: Provencher
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Liberal David Iftody 14,595 40.00 -0.82 $61,072
     Reform Larry Tardiff 12,798 35.08 -2.09 $42,111
     Progressive Conservative Clare Braun 5,955 16.32 +5.43 $60,432
     New Democratic Party Martha Wiebe Owen 3,137 8.60 +1.62 $1,793
Total valid votes 36,485 100.00
Total rejected ballots 170 0.46 +0.13
Turnout 36,655 64.94 -5.61
Electors on the lists 56,442
Percentage change figures are factored for redistribution.
Sources: Official Results, Elections Canada and Financial Returns, Elections Canada.


Canadian federal election, 1993: Provencher
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Liberal David Iftody 16,119 44.04 +11.5 $42,045
     Reform Dean Whiteway 13,463 36.78 +33.1 $49,513
     Progressive Conservative Kelly Clark 3,765 10.29 -45.2 $48,359
     New Democratic Party Martha Wiebe Owen 1,818 4.97 -2.3 $7,277
     National Wes Penner 1,212 3.3 $23,719
     Natural Law Corrine Ayotte 157 0.43 +0.1 $12
Canada Party Ted Bezan 69 0.19 $0
Total valid votes 36,603 100.00
Total rejected ballots 126 0.34 +0.0
Turnout 36,729 69.52 -1.4
Electors on the lists 52,835
Source: Thirty-fifth General Election, 1993: Official Voting Results, Published by the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada. Financial figures taken from official contributions and expenses provided by Elections Canada.


Canadian federal election, 1988: Provencher
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
     Progressive Conservative Jake Epp 19,000 55.5 -2.7
Liberal Wes Penner 11,121 32.5 +12.4
     New Democratic Party Mary Sabovitch 2,490 7.3 -6.8
     Reform Lawrence Feilberg 1,246 3.6
     Confederation of Regions John Weibe 357 1.0 -5.8
Total valid votes 34,214 100.0
Total rejected ballots 106 0.3
Turnout 34,320 70.9
Electors on the lists 48,385
Canadian federal election, 1984
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Jake Epp 20,077 58.3 +13.3
New Democratic Ron Buzahora 6,941 20.1 -8.3
Liberal Wally Rempel 4,859 14.1 -11.2
Confederation of Regions Ron Bowers 2,347 6.8
Libertarian Donald Ives 232 0.7
Total valid votes 34,456 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1980
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Jake Epp 14,677 44.9 -6.7
New Democratic Richard Rattai 9,281 28.4 +2.7
Liberal Clare Cremer 8,271 25.3 +2.7
Rhinoceros Lawrence Feilberg 433 1.3
Total valid votes 32,662 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1979
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Jake Epp 17,030 51.7 -3.1
New Democratic Richard C. Greenway 8,473 25.7 +5.7
Liberal Howard Loewen 7,459 22.6 -0.1
Total valid votes 32,962 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1974
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Jake Epp 13,405 54.8 +9.4
Liberal Tom Copeland 5,558 22.7 -3.4
New Democratic Jack Feely 4,907 20.0 -5.3
Social Credit Jake Wall 613 2.5 -0.7
Total valid votes 24,483 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1972
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Jake Epp 11,262 45.3 +9.4
Liberal Mark Smerchanski 6,489 26.1 -15.5
New Democratic Alf Chorney 6,304 25.4 +11.2
Social Credit Jake Wall 784 3.2 -5.0
Total valid votes 24,839 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1968
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Mark Smerchanski 9,021 41.6 +2.7
Progressive Conservative Warner Jorgenson 7,791 36.0 -12.1
New Democratic Harry Blake-Knox 3,078 14.2 +10.2
Social Credit Lorne Reznowski 1,773 8.2 -0.7
Total valid votes 21,663 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1965
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Warner Jorgenson 6,470 48.1 +2.0
Liberal Gordon Barkman 5,243 39.0 +2.3
Social Credit Wilbert J. Tinkler 1,195 8.9 -8.3
New Democratic Francis Clement Anderson 542 4.0
Total valid votes 13,450 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1963
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Warner Jorgenson 6,729 46.1 +2.6
Liberal Stan C. Roberts 5,351 36.7 -0.4
Social Credit Elie J. Dorge 2,512 17.2 -0.3
Total valid votes 14,592 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1962
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Warner Jorgenson 6,214 43.5 -11.0
Liberal Stan C. Roberts 5,290 37.1 +2.4
Social Credit John P. Loewen 2,504 17.5 +8.6
New Democratic Peter Kruszelnicki 263 1.8 0.0
Total valid votes 14,271 100.0

Note: NDP vote is compared to CCF vote in 1958 election.

Canadian federal election, 1958
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Warner Jorgenson 8,278 54.5 +19.3
Liberal René Préfontaine 5,268 34.7 +1.3
Social Credit Wilbert James Tinkler 1,363 9.0 -20.7
Co-operative Commonwealth Jacob John Siemens 281 1.8 0.0
Total valid votes 15,190 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1957
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Warner Jorgenson 4,739 35.2 +13.8
Liberal René Jutras 4,489 33.3 -32.6
Social Credit Hugh M. Campbell 3,992 29.6 +17.0
Co-operative Commonwealth Charles Biesick 246 1.8
Total valid votes 13,466 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1953
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal René Jutras 6,632 66.0 +2.9
Progressive Conservative Abram J. Thiessen 2,151 21.4
Social Credit Wilbert Tinkler 1,269 12.6
Total valid votes 10,052 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1949
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal René Jutras 6,834 63.0 +23.3
Independent Bruce MacKenzie 4,008 37.0
Total valid votes 10,842 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1945
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal René Jutras 4,541 39.7 +8.9
Independent Leo Arthur Slater 2,220 19.4 -7.8
Social Credit Paul Prince 1,940 17.0 +10.1
Co-operative Commonwealth Alexander Duncan Miller 1,838 16.1 +9.2
Progressive Conservative Dalton Madill Boyd 894 7.8 -4.0
Total valid votes 11,433 100.0

Note: Progressive Conservative vote is compared to "National Government" vote in 1940 election. Social Credit vote is compared to New Democracy vote in 1940 election.

Canadian federal election, 1940
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal René Jutras 3,768 30.8 -31.9
Independent Leo A. Slater 3,329 27.2
Independent Harry Matthew Podolsky 1,765 14.4
National Government William Richard Johnston 1,441 11.8 -25.5
New Democracy Albert Banville 1,099 9.0
Co-operative Commonwealth Évariste Rupert Gagnon 841 6.9
Total valid votes 12,243 100.0

Note: "National Government" vote is compared to Conservative vote in 1935 election.

Canadian federal election, 1935
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Arthur-Lucien Beaubien 6,308 62.7 +4.8
Conservative Philippe Bourgeois 3,751 37.3 +8.4
Total valid votes 10,059 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1930
Party Candidate Votes %
Liberal–Progressive Arthur-Lucien Beaubien 4,562 58.0
Conservative Joseph-Arthur Belanger 2,274 28.9
Independent Conservative Wasyl Kobzar 715 9.1
Liberal Alexandre Ayotte 321 4.1
Total valid votes 7,872 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1926
Party Candidate Votes
Liberal–Progressive Arthur-Lucien Beaubien acclaimed
Canadian federal election, 1925
Party Candidate Votes %
Progressive Arthur-Lucien Beaubien 2,736 50.7
Liberal Edmond Comeault 2,656 49.3
Total valid votes 5,392 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1921
Party Candidate Votes %
Liberal Arthur-Lucien Beaubien 3,189 46.9
Liberal John P. Molloy 2,177 32.0
Independent Albert Préfontaine 1,428 21.0
Total valid votes 6,794 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1917
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Opposition (Laurier Liberals) John Patrick Molloy 2,035 52.4 -1.0
Government (Unionist) John Robert Johns 1,850 47.6 1.0
Total valid votes 3,885 100.0

Note: Unionist vote is compared to Conservative vote in 1911 election.

Canadian federal election, 1911
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal John Patrick Molloy 3,049 53.3 -1.3
Conservative Joseph Alfred Féréol Bleau 2,668 46.7 +1.3
Total valid votes 5,717 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1908
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal John Patrick Molloy 2,719 54.6 +4.5
Conservative Alphonse-Alfred-Clément Larivière 2,259 45.4 -4.5
Total valid votes 4,978 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1904
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Joseph-Ernest Cyr 1,896 50.1 +0.9
Conservative Alphonse-Alfred-Clément Larivière 1,886 49.9 -0.9
Total valid votes 3,782 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1900
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Conservative Alphonse-Alfred-Clément Larivière 1,528 50.7 -13.8
Liberal S.A.D. Bertrand 1,484 49.3 +13.8
Total valid votes 3,012 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1896
Party Candidate Votes %
Conservative Alphonse-Alfred-Clément Larivière 1,476 64.6
Liberal George Walton 810 35.4
Total valid votes 2,286 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1891
Party Candidate Votes
Conservative Alphonse-Alfred-Clément Larivière acclaimed
Canadian federal by-election, 24 January 1889
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
On Mr. Royal being appointed Lieutenant-Governor of the North West Territories
Conservative Alphonse-Alfred-Clément Larivière 797 48.3 -9.8
Unknown Richard 583 35.4
Unknown Clarke 269 16.3
Total valid votes 1,649 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1887
Party Candidate Votes %
Conservative Joseph Royal 1,081 58.1
Independent Liberal Joseph Ernest Cyr 778 41.9
Total valid votes 1,859 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1882
Party Candidate Votes
Conservative Joseph Royal acclaimed
Canadian federal by-election, 30 December 1879
Party Candidate Votes %
Conservative Joseph Royal 652 62.6
Unknown John Molloy 269 25.8
Unknown S. Hamelin 121 11.6
Total valid votes 1,042 100.0
Called upon Mr. Dubuc being appointed Puisne Judge of the Court of Queen's Bench for Manitoba.
Canadian federal election, 1878
Party Candidate Votes
Conservative Joseph Dubuc acclaimed
By-election on 31 March 1875

On Mr. Riel being unseated and declared an outlaw, 25 February 1875

Party Candidate Votes
Liberal Andrew Bannatyne acclaimed
By-election on 3 September 1874

On Mr. Riel being expelled from the House of Commons, 16 April 1874

Party Candidate Votes
Independent Louis Riel acclaimed
Canadian federal election, 1874
Party Candidate Votes %
Independent Louis Riel 195 73.9
Unknown J. Hamelin 69 26.1
Total valid votes 264 100.0
By-election on 13 October 1873

On Mr. Cartier's death, 20 May 1873

Party Candidate Votes
Independent Louis Riel acclaimed
Canadian federal election, 1872
Party Candidate Votes
Liberal–Conservative George-Étienne Cartier acclaimed
Canadian federal by-election, 3 March 1871
Party Candidate Votes %
Conservative Pierre Delorme 172 85.6
Liberal William Dease 29 14.4
Total valid votes 201 100.0
Called as a result of Manitoba joining Confederation, 15 July 1870.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 49°41′46″N 95°54′36″W / 49.696°N 95.910°W / 49.696; -95.910